COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
A B C E F G H I J L M N P R S T W
A [top]
ACCT 2101 Principles of Accounting I 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: MATH 1111, BUSA 1105
An introduction to the principles and practices of accounting. Topics include the construction and interpretation of accounting statements and the theory of debits and credits as applied business transactions and records.
ACCT 2102 Principles of Accounting II 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: ACCT 2101 with a grade of C grade or better
A continuation of ACCT 2101, with emphasis on the detailed application of accounting principles to corporation accounting, cost accounting and accounting as a tool for business decisions.
ACCT 3050 Accounting and Reporting for Governmental and Non-profit Entities 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: ACCT 2101 with a grade of C or better and Junior Standing
This course introduces the student to theory and practice of financial accounting and reporting related to governmental and nonprofit entities. Topics covered will include the promulgated standards, conceptual issues, and special topics as necessary. Comparisons will be drawn with accounting and reporting theory and practice of private business. The focus will be on local, state and federal accounting and reporting issues. A summary of the similarities and differences related to nonprofits will be included.
ACCT 3100 Cost Accounting 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: ACCT 2102
A study of cost concepts and cost flows, cost behavior and cost estimation, job order costing, process costing, activity based costing, and joint product and byproduct costing.
ACCT 3110 Intermediate Accounting I 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: ACCT 2102 with a C grade or better
This is the first in a two course sequence intended for students concentrating on accounting as their primary field of study. This course is also helpful for students concentrating in finance. The first semester covers the theory and practice of accounting, an overview of the basic financial statements, and accounting treatment of: cash and receivables; inventory; property, plant and equipment; current liabilities and contingencies.
ACCT 3120 Intermediate Accounting II 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: ACCT 3110 with a C grade or better
The course is the second in two course sequence intended for students concentrating on accounting as their primary field of study. This course is also helpful for students concentrating in finance. The second semester covers concepts related to the time value of money, revenue recognition, the statement of cash flows, and accounting for investments, bonds and notes payable, leases, income taxes, other post-employment benefits, shareholder’s equity, share-based compensation and earnings per share, and accounting changes and error corrections.
ACCT 3200 Principles of Taxation 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: ACCT 2102 with a grade of C grade or better
This course examines the principles and major provisions of federal income taxation as they apply to individuals and all types of business entities. It also includes making determination of tax liability as well as an introduction to tax research methodology.
ACCT 4100 Financial Statement Analysis 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: ACCT 2102 with a grade of C or better
The study of financial statements and their related footnotes, as well as tools and procedures common to financial statement analysis.
ACCT 4200 Auditing and Assurance 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: ACCT 3120
This course examines the fundamental principles and techniques of auditing and the reporting of audits. It also examines ethics, the legal environment, reporting standards, auditing standards, and fraud.
ACCT 4300 Advanced Financial Accounting 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: ACCT 3120 with a grade of C or better.
The objective of this course is to provide the student a detailed exposure to the financial accounting treatment of business combinations and consolidations; foreign currency transactions; and multinational, partnership, governmental, and not-for-profit accounting.
ACCT 4400 Accounting Information Systems 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: ACCT 3110
This course examines a variety of accounting transaction processing concepts; internal controls and systems analysis and design.
ACCT 4500 Special Topics 1 3 credits
Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit
Prerequisite: Permission of Department
Special Topics courses represent subject matter not covered in other courses in the curriculum. These are generally presented in a classroom setting. This class may be repeated one time with different content.
ACCT 4510 Independent Study 1 3 credits
Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit
Prerequisite: Permission of Department
An independent study represents research, readings, and/or projects under the direction of a faculty member of the School of Business and Public Management.
This is a customized course, conducted independently, which allows the student to participate in study that represents research, reading, and/or projects that is under the direction of a faculty member of the School of Business and Public Management. (Student must have a minimum of 45 contact hours for the course.) This class may be repeated one time with different content.
ACCT 4900 Internship 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: Senior standing in BBA program and permission of the instructor
This course provides the student with work experience in an accounting setting. Students are supervised by accounting faculty and the person or persons designated to coordinate the internship at the accounting practice.
AMST 1102 American Identities 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: None
This introductory course explores what it means to be American. Examining American Identities from local and global perspectives, and through a variety of disciplinary frameworks, this course focuses on the diverse forms of American Identity, as well as the social and cultural histories that have shaped these identities. Students examine their own and others' identities. Students gain knowledge and skills related to intercultural relations through various methods that include research, reading, writing, performance, and class activities.
AMST 3400 Introduction to Environmental Studies 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite or Co-requisite: AMST 3700
This course is a basic introduction to environmental studies. Students will learn to apply various concepts in the biological, physical, social sciences and humanities in order to understand the causes and consequences of environmental problems facing the world today, and what can be done to address them. Students will also be encouraged to explore how these concepts and issues relate to their own lives, from both global and local perspectives.
AMST 3700 Principles & Methods of American Studies 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: ENGL 1102, HIST 2111 or 2112; Pre or Co-requisite: AMST 1102
This course critically examines the meaning and culture of America locally and globally emphasizing principles of a scientific method. This reading-, writing-, and discussion-based course introduces students to the interdisciplinary study of American cultures. The course uses a wide variety of readings and activities from multiple academic disciplines and popular culture.
AMST 3710 America in the World 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: None
This course examines America as a cultural signifier that circulates around the world. These representations not only travel to other countries, but also return to us in cultural products from other countries. In addition to cultural theory, we will look at film, television, literature, and music. A primary concern is to interrogate what ideological assumptions underlie our notion of what America means.
AMST 3740 American Popular Culture 3 credits
3 class hours
Pre-requisites: None
This course is a critical analysis of popular culture in American society. A particular offering of the course could focus on a specific area of popular culture (e.g., books, music, sports, food, mass consumption and advertising) or survey several of those topics. Historical and theoretical readings will support students' analysis of primary texts, potentially including examples which highlight the globalization of American popular culture, mass markets and niche markets, the social formation of taste, and shifts in society's preferences for mass consumption in different time periods.
Note: Course can be repeated for credit provided the content differs entirely from the previous offering.
AMST 3760 Advanced Studies in American Identities 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: ENGL 1102 or AMST 1102
This course examines the construction of individual identities and identity groups in American culture. Students survey and critique a range of texts expressing and representing the formation of identity constructions around such categories as race, gender, ethnicity, national origin, class, and sexuality. Students consider the various historical, cultural and social forces that shape (and sometimes resist) diverse views of American identity both within and outside the U.S.
Note: Course may be repeated one time for up to 6 credits with a change in content.
AMST 3780 American Cultural Movements 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: ENGL 1102
This course examines the history of and relationships between selected cultural movements in the United States through an interdisciplinary lens. Drawing primarily on historical resources and cultural texts, the course analyzes the evolution and conduct of movements or of a particular major movement, as well as the evolution of academic inquiry and understanding of these movements.
AMST 3800 Introduction to Cultural Studies 3 credits
3 class hours
Pre-requisites: None
This course provides an introduction to critical approaches and debates in the field of cultural studies. The course examines how cultures emerge, the difference between high and mass culture, and how race, gender, and class are produced and consumed. Theoretical approaches are applied to an object of study chosen by the instructor, typically a single long text or a collection of shorter ones, for historical context.
AMST 4490 Special Topics in American Studies 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: AMST 3700 and AMST 3710 with a C grades or better and permission of the instructor.
The study of a selected topic in American Studies.
Note: Course may be repeated for up to 6 credits provided the content differs from the previous offering.
AMST 4900 American Studies Capstone 3 credits
3 class hours
Pre-requisites or co-requisites: Senior standing in the American Studies program and completion of all program core courses with a C or better.
The senior capstone practicum offers students the opportunity to structure, plan, design, implement, and present a final body of work under the supervision of a professor in their area of interest. This capstone project will provide the environment for the student to synthesize their learning experience as an American Studies major and give seniors the opportunity to communicate knowledge in their area of concentration. All projects will culminate in a required public presentation (poster, oral presentation, video, or other document) and in an academic setting. Depending on the area of concentration and each student's individual area of interest, the capstone experience may involve a service-learning component. A faculty member in the American Studies Program will direct the capstone experience each semester; in addition, each student completing the capstone experience will be required to solicit the participation of an additional faculty member who will serve as the student’s primary advisor for the project. The final grade for the project will be determined by both the capstone faculty member and the student's project advisor. Additionally, each student in the capstone experience will be required to pass a comprehensive exam, designed by the American Studies faculty, in which the student must demonstrate competency in both the American Studies core and in their specific track.
ANTH 1102 Introduction to Anthropology 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: None
This is a survey of general anthropology, the comparative study of humankind as a whole, including its major sub-disciplines: Cultural anthropology, archaeology, linguistics, and physical anthropology.
ANTH 3202 Cultural Anthropology 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: ANTH 1102
This is a survey of cultural anthropology, the comparative study of human cultural systems, with an applied component that will engage students in community-based service and anthropological research.
ARTS 1010 Drawing I 3 credits
1 class hour, 4 studio hours
Prerequisite: None
Introduction to techniques, materials, and strategies of drawing including linear and atmospheric perspective, figure/ground, gesture, contour, and value--using ink, charcoal, and graphite.
ARTS 1011 Drawing II 3 credits
1 class hour, 4 studio hours
Prerequisite: None
A continuation of Drawing I with emphasis on advanced visual problem solving including a practical survey of contemporary issues and practices in drawing.
ARTS 1020 Two Dimensional Design 3 credits
1 class hour, 4 studio hours
Prerequisite: None
A project-based survey of the various elements and principles of two-dimensional design with a section on the main principles of color theory. The course includes an introduction to computer art and one project each using vector and raster desktop publishing programs.
ARTS 1030 Three Dimensional Design 3 credits
1 class hour, 4 studio hours
Prerequisite: None
A project-based survey of the materials, techniques, and strategies involved in three-dimensional design including additive and subtractive modeling, as well as casting and construction of various forms.
ARTS 1100 Art Appreciation 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: None
A survey of the history and significance of world visual arts for non-majors. This course includes a hands-on component of several small studio projects.
NOTE: Art historical images surveyed in the course may contain some nudity.
ARTS 2003 Art History I 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: None
An overview of art history from pre-historic times to the Renaissance and a study of the influence of art of the past on that of today.
NOTE: Art historical images surveyed in the course may contain some nudity.
ARTS 2004 Art History II 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: None
An overview of art history from the Renaissance to modern times and a study of the influence of art of the past on that of today. NOTE: Art historical images surveyed in the course may contain some nudity.
ARTS 2020 Introduction to Painting 3 credits
1 class hour, 4 studio hours
Prerequisites: None, ARTS 1010 and ARTS 1020 recommended
An introductory studio course in painting using oil paint. Topics include grisaille, glazing, underpainting, portraiture, still life, landscape, and abstraction.
ARTS 2030 Introduction to Ceramics 3 credits
1 class hour, 4 studio hours
Prerequisite: None, ARTS 1010 and ARTS 1030 recommended
An introductory studio course in ceramics using stoneware. Topics include pinch building, coil building, slab construction, throwing, firing, and glazing.
ARTS 3050 American Art 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: ENGL 2111 or 2112
A survey of American visual art from the colonial period to the present. Lecture format. Grade determined by exams, papers, and discussion participation. Exams will include visual identification of works by significant American artists. The focus of the course will be the shift in the individual and collective ideal in response to scientific, industrial, and political American culture as interpreted through the visual arts.
ASTR 1010 Astronomy of the Solar System 4 credits
3 class hours, 3 laboratory hours.
Astronomical concepts, methods of observation, and a study of the solar system.
ASTR 1020 Stellar and Galactic Astronomy 4 credits
3 class hours, 3 laboratory hours.
Fundamental principles of stellar and galactic astronomy, stellar evolution, and cosmology.
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BIOL 1107 Principles of Biology I 4 credits
3 class hours, 2 laboratory hours
This is the first course in a sequence designed for majors in biology and related fields. Topic areas include the chemistry of cells, cell structure and function, cellular metabolism, DNA structure and function, genetics, and control of gene expression.
BIOL 1108 Principles of Biology II 4 credits
3 class hours, 2 laboratory hours
Prerequisite: BIOL 1107 with a C grade or better
This is the second course in a general biology sequence designed for majors in biology and related fields. This course begins with a review of phylogeny and diversity in all kingdoms. The second part of this course covers the functional anatomy and physiology of representative organisms. The third part of the course explores basic ecology and conservation biology.
BIOL 1120 Introduction to Environmental Science 3 credits
3 class hours
A one-semester course for students in non-science areas of concentration. This course is an introductory, interdisciplinary course that examines current local and global environmental issues and explores possible solutions. Specific topics include human population; industrial systems; air, terrestrial and water pollution; global warming; conventional and alternative energy; agriculture and food production; and waste management.
BIOL 1130 Human Biology 3 credits
3 class hours
The course, Human Biology, is an introduction to anatomy and physiology for the non-major with special emphasis on the processes involved in the development and maintenance of complex multicellular organisms.
BIOL 1140 Plants and Society 3 credits
3 class hours
This is a one-semester course for students in non-science areas of concentration. This course serves as an introduction to the study of botany and its applications, with an emphasis on the impact of plants on human society.
BIOL 2110 Human Anatomy and Physiology I 4 credits
3 class hours, 2 laboratory hours
This course is the first half of a two-semester course covering the structure and function of the human body, with laboratory gross dissection. The emphasis is on chemistry, cells, tissues, bones, muscles, and the nervous system and cannot be taken if the student has a CPC deficiency in science. It is strongly recommended that the student have already taken introductory courses in biology and chemistry.
BIOL 2111 Human Anatomy & Physiology II 4 credits
3 class hours, 2 laboratory hours
Prerequisite: BIOL 2110 with a grade of C or better
This course is the second half of a two-semester course covering the structure and function of the human body, with laboratory gross dissection. Body systems included are cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, urinary, reproductive and endocrine.
BIOL 2215 Foundations of Microbiology 4 credits
3 class hours, 3 laboratory hours
Prerequisite: BIOL 1107 or BIOL 2110 or CHEM 1151 or CHEM 1211 with a C or better
This course is a survey of microorganisms with emphasis on bacteria and their relationships to man. This course covers microbial growth, metabolism, genetics, and classification. It is strongly recommended that the student have two years of high school biology, some high school chemistry or have taken BIOL 1107. Cannot be used in Area D.
BIOL 2220 Botany 4 credits
3 class hours, 3 laboratory hours
Prerequisite: BIOL 1108 with a grade of C or better
An overview of plant form and function, development and reproduction, systematics, ecology, and economic importance.
BIOL 2270 Zoology 4 credits
3 class hours, 3 laboratory hours
Prerequisite: BIOL 1108 with a grade of C or better
A comparative study of the taxonomy, functional morphology, development, ecology and evolutionary relationships of representative animals.
BIOL 3060 Aquatic Biology & Ecology 4 credits
3 class hours, 3 laboratory hours
Prerequisite: BIOL 3300 with a grade of C or better
In this course the student will examine and study the diversity and ecology of plants, animals, and microorganisms that live in water. Emphasis will be placed on freshwater forms found in the Southeastern United States. Field trips will be required.
BIOL 3100 Biochemistry 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: BIOL 1108 and CHEM 2212 with a grade of C or better
This is a one-semester course covering the principles of biological chemistry with an emphasis on the structure and function of biological molecules (proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids), metabolism and bioenergetics, and flow of genetic information.
BIOL 3110 Human Anatomy 4 credits
3 class hours, 3 laboratory hours
Prerequisite: BIOL 1108 with a grade of C or better or permission of Instructor
A one-semester course entailing the descriptive and functional analysis of human body structure.
BIOL 3111 Human Physiology 4 credits
3 class hours, 3 laboratory hours
Prerequisite: BIOL 1108 with a grade of C or better or permission of Instructor
A one-semester course providing a comprehensive description and analysis of human body functions.
BIOL 3150 Principles of Ecology 4 credits
3 class hours, 2 laboratory hours
Prerequisite: None
This is a one semester course designed for non-science majors (e.g. Middle Grades Education) to fill the requirements for upper level science content courses. This course serves to provide an introduction to the field of ecology and covers basic ecological principles. Specific topics include: biotic and abiotic structures of the environment, animal and plant adaptations to the environment, community dynamics, predator-prey interactions, and population regulation. Lab exercises and field activities supplement lecture material.
BIOL 3200 Plant Anatomy 4 credits
3 class hours, 3 laboratory hours
Prerequisites: BIOL 2220 with a grade of C or better
A study of the origin, development, and structure of cells, tissues, organs, and special anatomical features of vascular plants. Laboratories stress microtechnique, including preparation, staining, and sectioning plant tissues.
BIOL 3250 Marine Biology 4 credits
3 class hours, 3 laboratory hours
Prerequisites: BIO 1108 with a grade of C or better or Permission of Instructor
This course is an introduction to the marine environment and includes a survey of the general marine habitats and the organisms that occupy those habitats. Field trips are an integral part of this course and most are required.
BIOL 3300 Ecology 4 credits
3 class hours, 3 laboratory hours
Prerequisites: BIOL 1108 and CHEM 1212 with a grade of C or better
A one-semester course that is a survey of the primary ecological principles and processes and their applications. Lecture and laboratory activities will focus on ecosystem dynamics, system sustainability and its importance to humans, and will include some field trips.
BIOL 3350 Animal Anatomy 4 credits
3 class hours, 3 laboratory hours
Prerequisites: BIOL 2270 with a grade of C or better
A comparative study of invertebrate and vertebrate structure. Lectures will include the phylogeny of organ systems and the integration of systems into the individual organism. Laboratories will include dissection of representative invertebrate and vertebrate species.
BIOL 3370 Invertebrate Natural History 4 credits
3 class hours, 3 laboratory hours
Prerequisite: BIOL 2270 with a grade of C or better
A study of the diversity of invertebrate life forms. The course will entail a study of the taxonomy, morphology, development, ecology and evolution of invertebrate species.
BIOL 3380 Vertebrate Natural History 4 credits
3 class hours, 3 laboratory hours
Prerequisite: BIOL 2270 with a grade of C or better
A study of the diversity of vertebrate life forms. The course will entail a study of the taxonomy, development, ecology and evolution of vertebrate species.
BIOL 3400 Plant Physiology 4 credits
3 class hours, 3 laboratory hours
Prerequisites: BIOL 2220 with a grade of C or better
An overview of the life processes of plants. Topics include photosynthesis, movement of water and solutes, plant nutrition and soils, and internal and external factors affecting plant growth and flowering.
BIOL 3410 Pathophysiology 4 credits
3 class hours, 3 laboratory hours
Prerequisites: BIOL 3350 and 3450 with a grade of C or better
This course entails a study of the pathophysiology of the major organs and systems of the human body. Emphasis will be placed on alterations and adaptations of body systems in relationship to disease. Laboratory exercises will provide case studies, clinical-laboratory applications and correlations to concepts covered in the course as appropriate.
BIOL 3450 Animal Physiology 4 credits
3 class hours, 3 laboratory hours
Prerequisite: BIOL 2270 with a grade of C or better
A study of animal physiology with an emphasis on mammalian systems. The molecular and cellular aspects of physiology as they relate to these systems are considered. All major organ systems are considered.
BIOL 3760 Immunology 4 credits
3 class hours, 3 laboratory hours
Prerequisites: BIOL 1108 and CHEM 1212 with a grade of C or better
A study of the mammalian immune system, including comparative immunity, innate immunity, lymphocyte development, genetic recombination of immune receptors, antibody function, cell-mediated immunity, and immune disorders. Laboratory studies will include fundamentals of antigen-antibody reactions, serological procedures and selected cellular immunological protocols.
BIOL 4001 Topics in Biology I 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: Completion of 12 hours of upper division level Biology (3000-4000) with a grade of C or better and permission of the instructor.
The study of a selected topic in the biological sciences which must be different from the topic that was explored in BIOL 4002. This course does not include a laboratory component.
BIOL 4002 Topics in Biology II 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: Completion of 12 hours of upper division level Biology (3000-4000) with a grade of C or better and permission of the instructor
The study of a selected topic in the biological sciences which must be different from the topic that was explored in BIOL 4001. This course does not include a laboratory component.
BIOL 4020 Conservation Biology 4 credits
3 class hours and 3 laboratory hours
Prerequisites: BIOL 3300 and BIOL 4110 or permission of the instructor
Conservation biology examines the importance, declines and preservation of biodiversity at the genetic, population, community, ecosystem and biosphere levels. Topics will include species status, policy and laws, protected areas and hotspots, lessons from animal behavior and examples of in and ex situ wildlife management. Readings will be from textbooks and primary literature. Field trips are required.
BIOL 4050 Microbial Diversity 4 credits
3 class hours, 3 laboratory hours
Prerequisites: BIOL 1108 and CHEM 2212 with a grade of C or better
This course is a survey of microorganisms including bacteria, fungi, viruses, and parasites. The topics covered in this course will include microbial morphology, structure and function, pathogenesis, physiology, genetics, and ecology. This course will examine the role of microbes in the medical field and biotechnology, as well as, food, environmental, and industrial microbiology.
BIOL 4110 Genetics 4 credits
3 class hours, 3 laboratory hours
Prerequisites: BIOL 1108, CHEM 1212, MATH 1113 or MATH 1111 and MATH 2212 with a grade of C or better
This course is designed to provide students with a broad background in Genetics. This course includes: Mendelian, molecular, population, and evolutionary genetics. Throughout the course, experiments that led to major advances in genetics will be discussed in the context of utilizing the scientific method.
BIOL 4126 Parasitology 4 credits
3 class hours, 3 laboratory hours
Prerequisites: BIOL 2270 with a grade of C or better
This course is a study of the diversity of parasites. The course will emphasize the taxonomy, development, ecology, evolution, pathology, and epidemiology of parasites.
BIOL 4200 Mycology 4 credits
3 class hours, 3 laboratory hours
Prerequisites: BIOL 2220 with a grade of C or better
In this course students will explore the diversity of the fungi and fungus-like organisms, covering their general biology at the cellular level as well as their roles as saprobes, symbionts, animal pathogens, and plant pathogens. The importance of fungi in industry and as models for research will also be covered.
BIOL 4440 Cell and Molecular Biology 4 credits
3 class hours, 3 laboratory hours
Prerequisites: BIOL 1108 and CHEM 1212 with a grade of C or better or permission of instructor.
In depth examination of the molecular mechanisms by which cellular processes are controlled, including cell-to-cell signaling and signal transduction, genomics, control of gene expression, and the cell cycle. Laboratory studies will emphasize recombinant DNA technology and protein techniques.
BIOL 4450 Field Biology 4 credits
3 class hours, 3 laboratory hours
Prerequisite: BIOL 3300 with a grade of C or better
Classroom lectures will cover the natural history, habitats, and ecology of the coastal region in relation to other parts of the world. Field studies will include a study of the local flora and fauna of the region with emphasis on taxonomy and phylogenetic relationships. Field trips will be required.
BIOL 4500 Introduction to Biological Research: Service Learning 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: Minimum cumulative GPA 2.5, minimum GPA in Biology 2.0,completion of 12 hours upper division level biology (3000-4000) with a grade of C or better and permission of instructor
The course includes an introduction to research and research methods as well as review the basic statistical methods used in research. The student is expected to select and plan a research problem that will be presented during BIOL 4950. The research is conducted under the supervision of a student-selected faculty mentor. This course should be taken during the Spring Semester of the student’s junior year.
BIOL 4650 Animal Behavior 4 credits
3 class hours and 3 laboratory hours
Prerequisites: BIOLOGY 1107 and 1108
This course introduces students to basic concepts and theories in animal behavior and to the techniques, both field and laboratory, that students of behavior use in conducting research. Topics to be covered include natural and sexual selection; mate choice and reproductive strategies; life history evolution; foraging; predator/prey interactions; migration and orientation; and sociality. The behaviors studied take place within communities and ecosystems; many of these are at risk. Students will learn the important role that behavioral studies play in conservation at multiple levels from managing protected reserves to conducting successful reintroductions. Readings will be from textbooks and primary literature. Field trips are required.
BIOL 4890 Neurobiology 4 credits
3 class hours, 3 laboratory hours
Prerequisite: BIOL 4440 with a grade of C or better
A study of neural function from the cellular through the behavioral levels. Analysis of neural structures and functions from the perspectives of electrophysiology, neurotransmitter mechanisms and pharmacology, neural circuits, and comparative neuroanatomy.
BIOL 4900 Service Learning Internship in Biology 3 credits
Minimum of 90 hours of field laboratory work
Prerequisites: Coastal Ecology Track - BIOL 3300 and permission of instructor/Pre-Professional Track - BIOL 3350 and BIOL 3450 and permission of instructor.
This course will apply to internships and domestic or international filed studies programs sponsored by other institutions of higher education. Students will participate in a Service-Learning Internship, course, or field study during which they will participate in or design a scientific project. Students must apply for this course in writing to the Dean of Arts and Sciences stating the name of the course or internship, who will be supervising, the sponsoring institution, the student's objectives for taking this course, where the field study or internship is being conducted and when the field trip or internship begins and ends.
BIOL 4905 Research Independent Study 3 credits
Requirements: Submission, to the Department Chair, a one page proposal that outlines research goals and identifies a research mentor.
Research mentor may be CCGA faculty or off campus scientists. Both research proposal and mentor must be approved by the Department Chair. A maximum of 4 credits may be applied per degree.
BIOL 4950 Senior Seminar: Service Learning 1 credit
1 class hour
Prerequisite: Senior status and completion of all Biology degree program core requirements with a C grade or better. The capstone course in biology.
This course assesses the student's ability to research independently, assimilate the information and disseminate the information in an organized understandable fashion in both written and oral forms. The student will also take the ETS major field test in biology and complete the department senior exit questionnaire for course completion. This course should be taken during the Spring Semester of the student’s senior year.
BISM 3100 Principles of Management Information Systems 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: BUSA 1105 and ITEC 2100 with a grade of C or better
Examines conceptual foundations, strategic and competitive uses, as well as global and ethical issues in the use of information systems technology by managers and professionals to improve organizational performance, group work, and personal productivity. Students discover how various information systems enable improvement in operations, management, analysis, and decision-making and support functions in business organizations.
BISM 3135 System Analysis and Design 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite BISM 3100 or Permission of instructor
The course introduces the fundamental principles of information systems analysis and design. Emphasis is on applying tools and techniques commonly used by systems analysts to build and document information systems. Classical and structured tools for describing data flow, data structure, process flow, file design, input and output design, and program specifications will be discussed. Object-oriented concepts and techniques will also be introduced.
BISM 4500 Special topics 1 3 credits
1 class hour
Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit.
Prerequisite: Permission of Department
Special topics courses represent subject matter not covered in other courses in the curriculum. These are generally presented in a classroom setting. This class may be repeated one time with different content.
BISM 4510 Independent Study 1 3 credits
Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit.
Prerequisite: Permission of Department
This is a customized course, conducted independently, which allows the student to participate in study that represents research, reading, and/or projects that is under the direction of a faculty member of the School of Business and Public Management. (Student must have a minimum of 45 contact hours for the course.) This class may be repeated one time with different content.
BUSA 1105 Introduction to Business 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: NONE
A study of the principles and practices of business in a system of private enterprise. Examines the functions of finance, accounting, marketing and management in the operation of a business.
BUSA 2106 The Environment of Business 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: NONE
An introduction to the legal, regulatory, political, social and cultural environment of private enterprise. Includes an overview of how demographic diversity affects business firms.
BUSA 3120 Business Communication and Personal Professional Development 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: ACCT 2102, BUSA 1105, ECON 2105, and ECON 2106 with a grade of C or better
This is a study and practice of strategies, skills, and principles of effective business communication in its myriad forms coupled with a focus on professional development. Major emphasis will be placed on not only understanding business communications and the roles that attitudes, values, and behaviors play, but additionally, the simultaneous evolution of the student's professional development. The program's official communication competencies assessment (i.e., oral, written), which students are required to pass prior to enrollment in the internship (BUSA 4900 or ACCT 4900), is also administered in this course.
BUSA 4300 Management of Competitive Analysis 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: ECON 3231, MGMT 3110, MKTG 3100 with a grade of C or better
Introduction to decision-making contexts, processes, and techniques of managing competitive intelligence (CI). CI is the interpretation of signals from the environment for an organization's decision makers to understand and anticipate industry change. Contexts addressed include the practical application of CI to ethical, functional organizational, industry-specific, international, and technological domains.
BUSA 4400 Analysis of Business, Competitive & Management Information 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: ECON 3231, MGMT 3110, MKTG 3100 with a grade of C or better
This course provides students the opportunity to learn about both the process of gathering information and performing analysis valuable for organizational decision makers. Subjects emphasized include analyzing competition, customers, environments, markets, organization, financial and temporal resources.
BUSA 4500 Special Topics 1 3 credits
Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit.
Prerequisite: Permission of Department
Special Topics courses represent subject matter not covered in other courses in the curriculum. These are generally presented in a classroom setting. This class may be repeated one time with different content.
BUSA 4510 Independent Study 3 credits
Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit.
Prerequisite: Permission of Department
This is a customized course, conducted independently, which allows the student to participate in study that represents research, reading, and/or projects that is under the direction of a faculty member of the School of Business and Public Management. (Student must have a minimum of 45 contact hours for the course.) This class may be repeated one time with different content.
BUSA 4900 Internship 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: Senior standing in BBA program and permission of the instructor
This course provides the student with work experience in a professional business setting. Students are supervised by business administration program faculty and the person or persons designated to coordinate the internship at the place of business.
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CHEM 1000 Preparatory Chemistry 1 credit
1 class hour, 0 laboratory hours
Pre-requisite: Entry into CHEM 1000 is either by choice or placement (Math SAT of 430 or less or Math ACT of 18 or less). Students must be concurrently enrolled in CHEM 1211 Principles of Chemistry I.
This course provides foundational concepts needed to support students enrolled in CHEM 1211 Principles of Chemistry I. The topics covered include scientific notation and algebra, the metric system, significant figures, conversion factors, as well as effective study techniques. Institutional credit only.
CHEM 1100 Introductory Chemistry 4 credits
3 class hours, 2 laboratory hours
A one-semester course covering some basic concepts and applications of chemistry for non-science majors. Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material.
CHEM 1151 Survey of Chemistry I 4 credits
3 class hours, 3 laboratory hours
First course in a two-semester sequence covering elementary principles of general, organic, and biochemistry designed for allied health professions majors. Topics to be covered include elements and compounds, chemical equations, nomenclature, and molecular geometry. Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material.
CHEM 1152 Survey of Chemistry II 4 credits
3 class hours, 3 laboratory hours
Prerequisite: CHEM 1151 with a grade of C or better
Second course in a two-semester sequence covering elementary principles of general, organic, and biochemistry designed for allied health professions majors. Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material.
CHEM 1211 Principles of Chemistry I 4 credits
3 class hours, 3 laboratory hours
Prerequisite/Corequisite: MATH 1111 or MATH 1113
Note: Students who have any CPC requirements in mathematics or science should not take CHEM 1211. It is strongly recommended that students complete one year of high school chemistry or CHEM 1151 before attempting this course.
First course in a two-semester sequence covering the fundamental principles and applications of chemistry designed for science majors. Topics to be covered include composition of matter, stoichiometry, periodic relations, and nomenclature. Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material.
CHEM 1212 Principles of Chemistry II 4 credits
3 class hours, 3 laboratory hours
Prerequisite: CHEM 1211 with a grade of C or better
Second course in a two-semester sequence covering the fundamental principles and applications of chemistry designed for science majors. Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material.
CHEM 2211 Organic Chemistry I 4 credits
3 class hours, 3 laboratory hours
Prerequisite: CHEM 1212 with a grade of C or better
First course in a two-semester sequence covering the fundamental principles and theories of organic chemistry. Topics to be covered include bonding, organic functional groups, organic synthesis, and spectroscopic analysis of organic molecules. Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material.
CHEM 2212 Organic Chemistry II 4 credits
3 class hours, 3 laboratory hours
Prerequisite: CHEM 2211 with a grade of C or better
Second course in a two-semester sequence covering the fundamental principles and theories of organic chemistry. Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material.
CHEM 3100 Biochemistry 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: BIOL 1108 and CHEM 2212 with a grade of C or better
This is a one-semester course covering the principles of biological chemistry with an emphasis on the structure and function of biological molecules (proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids), metabolism and bioenergetics, and flow of genetic information.
CMLT 1100 Introduction to Clinical Laboratory Techniques 4 credits
4 class hours
This course is designed for the beginning CLT student and provides basic didactic instruction in the major areas of clinical laboratory science and also includes laboratory safety, OSHA requirements related to bloodborne pathogens, professionalism, medical ethics, medical terminology, introductory laboratory calculations, and basic phlebotomy.
CMLT 1101 Introduction to Clinical Laboratory Techniques Lab 2 credits
4 laboratory hours
Prerequisite or Corequisite: CMLT 1100
Student practice in the performance of basic skills required in the various departments of a clinical laboratory.
CMLT 1200 Intermediate Clinical Laboratory Techniques I 4 credits
4 class hours
This course provides didactic instruction in hematology, urinalysis, immunohematology and serology.
CMLT 1201 Intermediate Clinical Laboratory Techniques I Lab 2 credits
4 laboratory hours
Prerequisite or Corequisite: CMLT 1200
Student practice in the performance of entry level skills in the areas of hematology, urinalysis, immunohematology and serology.
CMLT 1300 Intermediate Clinical Laboratory Techniques II 4 credits
4 class hours
Prerequisite or Corequisite: CMLT 1100 or CMLT 1200
This course provides didactic instruction in the areas of clinical chemistry, clinical microbiology, body fluid analysis, and immunodiagnostics.
CMLT 1301 Intermediate Clinical Laboratory Techniques II Lab 2 credits
4 laboratory hours
Prerequisite or Corequisite: CMLT 1300
Student practice in the performance of entry level skills in clinical chemistry, clinical microbiology, body fluid analysis, and immunodiagnostics.
CMLT 1400 Advanced Clinical Laboratory Techniques 4 credits
4 class hours
Prerequisite or Corequisite: CMLT 1100 or CMLT 1200
Additional didactic instruction in hematology, clinical microbiology, clinical chemistry, and immunohematology to prepare students with the theoretical concepts of high complexity testing in today's clinical environment.
CMLT 1401 Advanced Clinical Laboratory Techniques Lab 2 credits
4 laboratory hours
Prerequisite or Corequisite: CMLT 1100, CMLT 1200, and CMLT 1400
Students practice in the performance of high complexity testing in hematology, microbiology, clinical chemistry, and immunohematology.
CMLT 2101 Directed Clinical Practice in Phlebotomy 3 credits
6 laboratory hours
This course is designed to provide clinical training and practice in the collection of blood samples for laboratory testing. It includes all aspects of phlebotomy in health care. Students complete 50 hours of phlebotomy training at Southeast Georgia Regional Medical Center. This practicum may be taken any semester after successful completion of a CMLT techniques course with a grade of C or better.
CMLT 2102 Directed Clinical Practice I 6 credits
30 laboratory hours
Prerequisites: CMLT 1100, CMLT 1104, CMLT 1200, and CMLT 1400
This course provides a clinical rotation at an approved clinical affiliate through the departments of Hematology, Urinalysis, Serology/Immunology. It is taken after completion of all didactic CMLT courses with a grade of C or better.
CMLT 2103 Directed Clinical Practice II 6 credits
30 laboratory hours
Prerequisites: CMLT 1100, CMLT 1104, CMLT 1200, and CMLT 1400
This course provides a clinical rotation at an approved clinical affiliate through the departments of Clinical Chemistry, Clinical Microbiology, and Blood Banking. It is taken after completion of all didactic CMLT courses with a grade of C or better.
CMLT 2104 Seminar in Clinical Laboratory Science 2 credits
2 class hours
Prerequisites or Corequisites: CMLT 2102 and CMLT 2103
This course is designed for classroom/group discussion and presentation of case studies for students in directed clinical practice.
COMM 1101 Human Communication 3 credits
3 Class Hours
Prerequisite: None
This critical thinking-based course offers a broad approach to the elements of effective human communication. Students learn a variety of strategies that can be used to improve both professional and personal communication skills. Special emphasis is placed on interpersonal and intrapersonal communication, listening techniques, language use, nonverbal communication, cultural and gender diversity, and current communication technology. Students also gain experience in small group discussion and public speaking.
COMM 1110 Fundamentals of Speech Communication 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: ENGL 1101
This course presents the fundamentals of oral communication through public speaking and critical listening. Essential principles include research techniques, the reasoning process, creative speech analysis, organization, audience adaptation, supporting materials, ethical practices, and recognition of cultural diversity. Students will practice effective delivery of original speeches to a class audience.
COMM 2100 Survey of Mass Communication 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: COMM 1100
This course provides an introductory overview of mass communication, including the evolution of modern communication techniques in print and electronic media (for example -- radio, television, film, newspapers, and Internet). Current controversies are examined, stressing strengths and weaknesses of various forms of media. Students will develop analytic tools that will enhance their ability to evaluate and make judgments concerning messages they receive, and they will become more discriminating and critical viewers, listeners, and readers. Additionally, the course will explore media in a broader context -- that is, in relation to economic, political, social, and cultural aspects and issues.
COMM 2200 Intercultural Communication 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: COMM 1100
This course examines the process of communication among individuals from different cultures and subcultures. It focuses on the development of cultural awareness of self and others, knowledge, appreciation, skills development, and factors that facilitate or impede effective communication competence. Students study the effects of differing world views, value systems, language, nonverbal codes, and relational norms. Students also explore race, class, and gender to understand how these cultural and social constructs shape our sense of identity, beliefs, actions, and relationships with each other. Students are offered ample opportunities for thinking critically about the intellectual and political issues in cross-cultural encounters.
CRJU 1020 Introduction to Corrections 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite/Corequisite: CRJU 1100 or Permission of Instructor
This survey course provides an overview of the American correctional system and correctional practices. The course includes field trips to correctional institutions when logistically possible.
CRJU 1100 Introduction to Criminal Justice 3 credits
3 class hours
This survey course examines the emergence of formal institutions established within the American experience to deal with criminal behavior. The philosophical and cultural origins of the criminal justice system and current trends in criminal justice are emphasized.
CRJU 2000 Introduction to Law Enforcement 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite/Corequisite: CRJU 1100 or Permission of Instructor
A study of the organization and administration of local, state, and federal law enforcement agencies with emphasis on police departments. Includes an introduction to the history and philosophy of law enforcement.
CRJU 2070 Introduction to Criminal Law 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite/Corequisite: CRJU 1100 or Permission of Instructor
This course offers a study of the source and development of criminal law, its application, interpretation, and enforcement, and an analysis of Supreme Court decisions to emphasize problems in due process.
CRJU 2080 Introduction to Constitutional Law 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite/Corequisite: CRJU 1100 or Permission of Instructor
This course offers a survey level examination of the U.S. Constitution, the original Bill of Rights, and other ratified amendments. Emphasis is placed upon the Supreme Court decisions, which apply Constitutional standards to all elements of the Criminal Justice System, and impact daily life in the United States.
CRJU 2150 Introduction to Criminology 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite/Corequisite: CRJU 1100 or Permission of Instructor
A survey of the scope and varieties of crime, the societal and psychological causes of crime, the criminal subculture and society's reaction, the behavior of criminals in penal and correctional institutions and the problems of rehabilitating the convicted criminal.
CRJU 2160 Introduction to Criminal Investigations 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite/Corequisite: CRJU 1100 or Permission of Instructor
A survey provides an introduction to modern investigation methodologies used such as crime scene searches, the use of informants, and surveillance. Presentation of police cases in court will be used.
CRJU 3100 Criminal Justice and Security 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: Junior Standing
This course will introduce the student to the history and current elements of criminal justice and security in U.S. society. It will cover topics such as criminal justice landscape, current issues in criminal justice, contract and proprietary security, resource management and investigation, as well as contracting with the federal government, including the military, federal civilian agencies, and top secret facilities. Contracts and budgeting will also be covered.
CRJU 3110 Corrections Organizations and Systems 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: CRJU 3100 or permission of instructor
This course will introduce the student to the history and evolution of correctional organizations and systems in the U.S. It will cover topics including custodial and non-custodial functions, detention and incarceration centers and facilities, alternatives to incarceration, behavior modification, comparison of system costs, and effectiveness of various systems and organizations.
CRJU 3120 Community Policing 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: CRJU 3100 or permission of instructor
This course will introduce the student to the history and current practice of community policing in U.S. society. It will cover topics such as cost and effectiveness as compared to traditional policing methods, and the value of involving citizens to take responsibility for the safety of their community.
CRJU 3130 Courts and Criminal Procedure 3 credits
3 class hours
Pre-requisites: CRJU 1100; CRJU 2070
This course provides an in-depth examination of the various court systems (municipal, state, and federal) in the United States, including both trial and appellate courts. The course emphasizes the role of the law enforcement officer in the preparation of a criminal complaint, affidavit for an arrest or search warrant, and other documents required with having a defendant brought before a court to answer a criminal charge. The course is based on the rules of criminal procedure, focusing on those rules affecting law enforcement officers.
CRJU 4100 Homeland Security 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: CRJU 3100 or permission of instructor
This course will introduce the student to the history and current elements of homeland security in U.S. society. It will cover topics such as terrorism and counter-terrorism, terrorist groups, principles of emergency management, public health and environmental protection, private sector roles, and security vs. civil liberties.
CRJU 4110 Cyber-Crime and Cyber-Security 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: CRJU 3100 or permission of instructor
This course will introduce the student to the history and current elements of cyber-security and cyber-crime operations. It will cover areas such as the evolution of cyber-crime and cyber-security, investigative techniques, system improvements and target-hardening procedures, and strategic and tactical applications to cyber-crime and cyber-security.
CRJU 4120 Law Enforcement Intelligence Operations 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: CRJU 3100 or permission of instructor
This course will introduce the student to the history and current elements of law enforcement intelligence operations including implications for civil and criminal law. It will cover areas such as data mining, intelligence management, predictive analysis, and the relationship of such information to operational responsibilities and resource allocation.
CRJU 4130 Immigration and Border Security 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: CRJU 4100
This course provides an examination of U.S. immigration law and policy, with an emphasis on the distinct roles and responsibilities of local, state, and federal agencies. The course will examine perceptions of border security; the evolution of strategies to stem the flow of drugs and contraband into the United States; human trafficking, illegal immigration, and terrorism; as well as the geopolitical, social, and economic impacts of these strategies.
CRJU 4500 Special topics 1 3 credits
1 class hour
Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit.
Prerequisite: Permission of Department
Special topics courses represent subject matter not covered in other courses in the curriculum. These are generally presented in a classroom setting. This class may be repeated one time with different content.
CRJU 4510 Independent Study 1 3 credits
1 class hour
Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit.
Prerequisite: Permission of Department
This is a customized course, conducted independently, which allows the student to participate in study that represents research, reading, and/or projects that is under the direction of a faculty member of the School of Business and Public Management. (Student must have a minimum of 45 contact hours for the course.) This class may be repeated one time with different content.
CSCI 1201 Computer Concepts 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: None
A survey of computer information systems and equipment. The course introduces the student to hardware, software, data procedures, and human resources and examines their integration and application in the business setting. Students will experience the use of word processing, spreadsheet, and database management.
CSCI 1301 Computer Science I 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: MATH 1111 or MATH 1113
Provides an emphasis on problem identification and solution through a system of computer programs using such tools as structured charts, flowcharts and pseudo code. Topics include: problem solving process, fundamentals of structured programming, program development building blocks, simple date types, arithmetic and logical operators, selection structure, repetition structure, text files, arrays (one and two dimensional), procedural abstraction and software design, modular programming (including subprograms or the equivalent) programs. The programming language for this course is modern object-oriented computer language.
CSCI 1302 Computer Science II 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: CSCI 1301
This course is an extension of CSCI 1301. This course includes an overview of abstract data types (ADTs), arrays (multi-dimensional) and records, sets and strings, binary files, searching and sorting, introductory algorithm analysis (including Big-O), recursion, pointers and linked lists, software engineering concepts, dynamic data structures (stacks, queues, trees).
CSCI 1320 Introduction to Windows Programming using Microsoft Visual Basic 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: CSCI 1201
Introduces Microsoft Windows event-driven programming. Along with this new method of programming, common elements of Windows applications will be discussed. These elements will be created and manipulated using Microsoft's Visual Basic development environment. Topics include: Windows applications, user interface design, capturing and validating input, event-driven design, conditional processing, file processing, and incorporating graphics.
CULN 1103 Cooking Theory and Culture 2 credits
2 class hours
This course is designed to provide an introduction as well as a solid foundation needed to adapt to and be successful in a professional kitchen environment. In a controlled lab setting students will be introduced to basic and modern cooking techniques required as they progress to the basic cooking course and a production kitchen. The course will emphasize the mastery of cooking methods, techniques and sanitation. In addition, students will complete research and reading assignments that expose them to the rich history of food as well as the industry's future in the 21st century.
CULN 1105 Basic Food Preparation 3 credits
1 class hour, 6 laboratory hours
Prerequisite: HOSP 1107
This course is designed to develop skills in knife, tool and equipment handling, and to apply principles of food preparation to produce a variety of food products. The course stresses the proper and safe operation of equipment, as well as the importance of sanitation.
CULN 1106 Garde Manger 2 credits
1 class hour, 2 laboratory hours
Prerequisite: HOSP 1107
This course is designed to develop skills in producing a variety of cold food products, including items appropriate for buffet presentations. Decorative pieces will also be addressed.
CULN 1107 Menu Planning and Design 3 credits
3 class hours
This course is designed to develop skills in menu planning and the development of menus for a variety of facilities and services.
CULN 1108 Baking 1 3 credits
1 class hour, 6 laboratory hours
Prerequisite: HOSP 1107 or Permission of instructor
This course is designed to develop the fundamentals of baking science in the preparation of a variety of products. The use and care of baking equipment is stressed.
CULN 1111 Food Service Sanitation 2 credits
2 class hours
Studies of the principles of sanitation and dining room management for institutional and hospitality food service facilities. Food service sanitation includes material on food spoilage and food borne illness, maintenance of sanitary food facilities, equipment and supplies, and sanitation standards and regulations.
CULN 2105 Advanced Food Preparation 3 credits
1 class hour; 6 laboratory hours
Prerequisites: CULN 1105, HOSP 1107
This course is designed to further develop skills in food preparation and to produce a variety of food products. The course stresses the proper and safe operation of equipment and the importance of sanitation.
CULN 2106 Dining Room Management 2 credits
2 class hours
This course will familiarize students with dining room and banquet management, Including waiter and waitress training and the basic production processes and varieties of alcoholic and nonalcoholic beverages. (No alcohol will be on the campus.)
CULN 2108 Catering & Events Management 3 credits
1 class hour, 6 laboratory hours
Prerequisites: CULN 1105, CULN 1106, CULN 2105, HOSP 1107 or Permission of instructor
This course is designed to add balance and relevance to the preparation for a culinary career. Catering is more than creating a great meal. In this course, the student will learn the business aspects of both on premise and off premise catering, including menu planning, customer service, marketing and profitability. Students will continue to apply sanitation and proper cooking skills in the labs and/or on site endeavors.
CULN 2109 Purchasing and Receiving 2 credits
2 class hours
This course is designed to develop skills in the purchasing and receiving operations as they relate to food preparation. Students will learn and apply the quality standards and regulations that govern food products and will learn to receive and store food and non-food items properly.
CULN 2110 Culinary Cost Control 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: MATH 1001 or MATH 1111 or Permission of instructor
The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of cost control functions in the management of a dining room operation. It will provide hospitality (culinary) industry standards, terminology, flow and control of food and beverages through an operation. It will also include sales and marketing, labor costs and performance and other peripheral expenses that impact the culinary operation.
CULN 2112 Baking II 3 credits
1 class hour and 6 lab hours
Prerequisite: CULN 1108
This course is designed to reinforce and continue the knowledge and skills gained from CULN 1108. In Baking II students will gain proficiency in laminated and steam leavened dough, creams, custards and mousse, tarts, mini tea cookies and tuiles, cake formulas and mixing methods. Additionally, emphases will be placed on: icings, butter creams, meringues, glazes and fondant; decoration and assembly of cakes and tortes, specialty cakes, wedding cakes, chocolate, pulled sugar and other specialty products.
CULN 2205 International Cuisine 4 credits
1 class hour and 3 lab hours
Prerequisites: CULN 1105, CULN 1111 and CULN 2105
This course is designed to introduce the student to the diverse culture and historical significance of the cuisines from around the globe and to understand how these cuisines have influenced food in American society, and their flavors.
CULN 2902 Restaurant Operations - BOH 4 credits
0 Class hours, 12 laboratory hours
Prerequisites: Completion of all CULN classes
This capstone course provides the setting for the completion for the Culinary Arts Program. Restaurant Operations-Back of the House (BOH) is an advanced class offering students hands-on service learning in fully operating restaurant venue. The primary focus is a Bistro/fine dining experience being offered to the general public. Students will be expected to successfully execute meal service as assigned to the satisfaction of the paying guest. Demonstrating through service the understanding of menu development, business operations, profit and loss, cost control and product utilization will be stressed.
CULN 2903 Restaurant Operations - FOH 4 credits
0 Class hours, 12 laboratory hours
Prerequisites: Completion of all CULN classes
This capstone course will give students the opportunity to practice in a functioning restaurant the content that has been demonstrated in the culinary program. The course will include, but not be limited to, serving, hosting, handling, complaints from both the server and host points of view, operating and maintaining Point of Service (POS) systems, and analyzing POS reports. Students will work an average of 15 hours per week in the restaurant setting.
CULN 3000 Special Topics in Culinary Arts 6 credits
1 class hour, 10 laboratory hours
Prerequisites: ServSafe Certification and Permission from Instructor
This course is specifically designed as an introduction to culinary arts for non-culinary arts majors. The course is an 8-week intensive culinary program designed with culinary theory and the fundamentals of cooking and baking at the core of the instruction.
CULN 4500 Special topics 1 3 credits
1 class hour
Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit.
Prerequisite: Permission of Department
Special topics courses represent subject matter not covered in other courses in the curriculum. These are generally presented in a classroom setting. This class may be repeated one time with different content.
CULN 4510 Independent Study 1 3 credits
1 class hour
Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit.
Prerequisite: Permission of Department
This is a customized course, conducted independently, which allows the student to participate in study that represents research, reading, and/or projects that is under the direction of a faculty member of the School of Business and Public Management. (Student must have a minimum of 45 contact hours for the course.) This class may be repeated one time with different content.
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ECED 3310 Curriculum, Planning and Organization 2 credits
2 class hours
Prerequisites: SPED 3110 and Admission to Teacher Education cohort
This course provides teacher candidates an opportunity to learn and use the best practices associated with the design of curriculum, the planning and implementation of instruction, as well as appropriate use of visual literacies to enhance instruction.
ECED 3320 Nature, Needs and Development of Children 2 credits
2 class hours
Prerequisites: SPED 3110 and Admission to Teacher Education cohort
This course provides teacher candidates an opportunity to explore a comprehensive overview of developmental processes and cognitive learning theories appropriate for children in grades pre-school through grade five.
ECED 3330 Integrated Methods 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: ECED 3310 and Admission to Teacher Education cohort
This course provides teacher candidates an opportunity to learn and understand how to teach concepts and principles through inquiry based and other applicable instructional methods related to science, math and social science. Teacher candidates examine the theory and practice that impacts current interdisciplinary teaching and learning in early childhood education. The interrelationships of subject area concepts and themes as they are applied to the early childhood elementary curriculum are explored. Emphasis is on planning and design, methods of instruction and materials for teaching an interdisciplinary curriculum in the early childhood elementary classroom. In addition, the integration of appropriate technologies across the curriculum will be explored.
ECED 4310 Integrating Art and Music into the Curriculum 2 credits
2 class hours
Prerequisites: ECED 3310, ECED 3330, and Admission to Teacher Education cohort
This course provides teacher candidates an opportunity to design and integrate meaningful activities and programs in art, music, and theatre across the curriculum.
ECON 2105 Principles of Macroeconomics 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: MATH 1111
An introduction to macroeconomics, the study of how an economy as a whole functions. Students will learn about factors which affect aggregate production, employment and the general price level. Students will also study the Federal Reserve System and the role of the federal government in the economy.
ECON 2106 Principles of Microeconomics 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: MATH 1111
Microeconomics is the study of economic factors that affect the choices people make. Students will study the economic approach to value, the function of prices, how markets work, competition, and market structures.
ECON 3110 Money and Financial Markets 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: ECON 2105, ECON 2106 with a grade of C or better
This course examines monetary and financial instruments, institutions, and markets. Topics include money and capital markets, the foreign exchange market, the banking system, the Federal Reserve System, and monetary policy.
ECON 3131 Intermediate Macroeconomics 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: ECON 2105, ECON 2106 with a grade of C or better
The study of forces which determine the level of income, employment, inflation, interest rates, output with particular attention to the effects of government monetary and fiscal policy.
ECON 3200 International Economics 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: ECON 2105, ECON 2106 with a grade of C or better
This course introduces students to the basic elements of business and the global economy. The course examines global markets, international trade, international finance, balance of payments, the foreign exchange market, international banking and monetary policy.
ECON 3231 Intermediate Microeconomics 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: ECON 2105, ECON 2106 with a grade of C or better
This course examines the market mechanism and its relationship to major institutions. A major focus is on household decision making and consumer demand, as well as production, cost and the firm's supply decision. Also addresses market structures, market failures and the appropriate role of government policy in both a domestic and global context.
ECON 3315 U.S. Economic History 3 credits
Prerequisite: ECON 2105, ECON 2106 with a grade of C or better
This course explores the growth and development of the U.S. economy from colonial times to the present. The course emphasizes the structural change in key sectors, such as agriculture, transportation, and manufacturing, as well as crucial events, such as the Civil War and the Great Depression, that shaped the pace and pattern of U.S. economic development.
ECON 3340 Health Economics 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: ECON 2105 and ECON 2106 with a grade of C or better, Junior Standing
The course gives students an understanding of the economic theory behind policy, health services, supply, and consumption patterns. In addition, microeconomic principles will be applied to health production, the market for health insurance, an analysis of the health care industry and the evaluation of health policy.
ECON 4400 Public Economics 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: ECON 2105 and ECON 2106 with a grade of C or better
The course explores the role of government in the economy. It examines principles of taxation, tax policy, expenditure programs, income redistribution, and public policies to correct for market failure.
ECON 4500 Special Topics 1- 3 credits
1 class hour
Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit.
Prerequisite: Permission of Department
Special topics courses represent subject matter not covered in other courses in the curriculum. These are generally presented in a classroom setting. This class may be repeated one time with different content.
ECON 4510 Independent Study 1 3 credits
1 class hour
This is a customized course, conducted independently, which allows the student to participate in study that represents research, reading, and/or projects that is under the direction of a faculty member of the School of Business and Public Management. (Student must have a minimum of 45 contact hours for the course.) This class may be repeated one time with different content. (up to 6 hours credit.)
ECON 4960 Economics of Work and Pay 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: ECON 2105, ECON 2106 with a grade of C or better
This course applies economic theory to the analysis of labor markets. Topics examined include wage determination, employment and labor force growth, education and training, occupational attainment, unemployment, and the impact of discrimination, unions, and government policy on the functioning of labor markets.
ECSP 3100 Professional Seminar I 0 credit
0 class hours
Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education cohort
Corequisite: ECSP 3190
Professional Seminars represent three-hour workshops held at the beginning of the semester and monthly throughout the semester. These workshops provide an overview of the semester, the courses to be completed, the connections between courses, the overall course outcomes, dispositional expectations, technology skill development relative to the courses, and connection with the conceptual framework as candidates develop their knowledge, skills, and dispositions.
(No credit is awarded until the completion of ECSP 4101.)
ECSP 3101 Professional Seminar II 0 credit
0 class hours
Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education cohort
Corequisite: ECSP 3190
Professional Seminars represent three-hour workshops held at the beginning of the semester and monthly throughout the semester.
These workshops provide an overview of the semester, the courses to be completed, the connections between courses, the overall course outcomes, dispositional expectations, technology skill development relative to the courses, and connection with the conceptual framework as candidates develop their knowledge, skills, and dispositions. (No credit is awarded until the completion of ECSP 4101.)
ECSP 3110 Language for All Learners 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: SPED 3110, Admission to Teacher Education cohort
This course provides background in language development for all learners and critical issues for ESOL instruction.
ECSP 3120 Assessment and Evaluation of Learning 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: RDNG 3410, ECED 3320, Admission to Teacher Education cohort
The course provides teacher candidates with instruction in informal and formal assessment techniques and instruments appropriate for use in assessing all students, including students with disabilities. Included will be information about the pre-referral and referral processes, eligibility criteria for services, instructional decision-making issues, due process and development of individual educational plans as well as appropriate technologies for maintenance of data.
ECSP 3190 Integrated Practicum I 1 credit
1 class hour
Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education cohort
Corequisite: ECSP 3100
This course provides teacher education candidates with directed field experiences in the public schools with assignments and activities commensurate to their level and course work.
ECSP 3191 Integrated Practicum II 1 credit
1 class hour
Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education cohort
Corequisite: ECSP 3101
This course provides teacher education candidates with directed field experiences in the public schools with assignments and activities commensurate to their level and course work.
ECSP 4100 Professional Seminar III 0 credit
0 class hours
Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education cohort
Corequisite: ECSP 4190
Professional Seminars represent three-hour workshops held at the beginning of the semester and monthly throughout the semester.
These workshops provide an overview of the semester, the courses to be completed, the connections between courses, the overall course outcomes, dispositional expectations, technology skill development relative to the courses, and connection with the conceptual framework as candidates develop their knowledge, skills, and dispositions. (No credit is awarded until the completion of ECSP 4101.)
ECSP 4101 Professional Seminar IV 1 credit
1 class hours
Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education cohort
Corequisite: ECSP 4191
Professional Seminars represent three-hour workshops held at the beginning of the semester and monthly throughout the semester. These workshops provide an overview of the semester, the courses to be completed, the connections between courses, the overall course outcomes, dispositional expectations, technology skill development relative to the courses, and connection with the conceptual framework as candidates develop their knowledge, skills, and dispositions.
ECSP 4110 Behavior and Classroom Management 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: ECSP 3120, SPED 3220, Admission to Teacher Education cohort
This course provides teacher candidates an opportunity to create a well-managed classroom and guide the behavior of all children in grades P-5, including individual and classroom management, and behavioral assessments.
ECSP 4120 Professional Development Seminars 2 credits
2 class hours
Corequisites: ECSP 4100, ECSP 4190
Candidates are required to participate in a minimum of five Noon Seminars during the three semesters prior to their final semester. Noon seminars are coordinated by faculty in collaboration with local public schools. Following the Noon Seminar, candidates complete an on-line module and assessment. Noon Seminar topics include, but are not limited to these areas: children & poverty, teacher as leader, improving followership, making sense of UBD and GPS, ESOL and ESL instructional issues, critical conversational Spanish for an elementary school setting, content area reading strategies, and preschool curriculum.
ECSP 4190 Integrated Practicum III 1 credit
0 class hours
Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education cohort
Corequisite: ECSP 3190
This course provides teacher education candidates with directed field experiences in the public schools with assignments and activities commensurate to their level and course work.
ECSP 4191 Capstone Integrated Internship 6 credits
Teaching hours in the School - TBD
Prerequisite: Completion of all professional education coursework
This course provides teacher candidates an opportunity for full-time classroom teaching experience under the direction of an experienced mentor teacher and a college faculty supervisor. Placements must be in the public school setting grades 1-5 as well as a public school setting in an interrelated or inclusionary classroom.
EDUC 2110 Investigating Critical and Contemporary Issues in Education 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: ENGL 1101 and ENGL 1102
This course engages students in observations, interactions, and analyses of critical and contemporary educational issues. Students will investigate issues influencing the social and political contexts of educational settings in Georgia and the United States. Students will actively examine the teaching profession from multiple vantage points both within and outside the school. Against this backdrop, students will reflect on and interpret the meaning of education and schooling in a diverse culture, and examine the moral and ethical responsibilities of teaching in a democracy. In addition to class, an off-campus field component is required. Students cannot take EDUC 2110, EDUC 2120, and EDUC 2130 simultaneously without permission of the Dean.
EDUC 2120 Exploring Socio-Cultural Perspectives on Diversity in Educational Contexts 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: None
Given the rapidly changing demographics in our state and country, this course is designed to equip future teachers with the fundamental knowledge of understanding culture and teaching children from diverse backgrounds. Specifically, this course is designed to examine 1) the nature and function of culture; 2) the development of individual and group cultural identity; 3) definitions and implications of diversity; and 4) the influences of culture on learning, development, and pedagogy. In addition to class, an off-campus field component is required. Students cannot take EDUC 2110, EDUC 2120, and EDUC 2130 simultaneously without permission of the Dean.
EDUC 2130 Exploring Teaching and Learning 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: ENGL 1101 and ENGL 1102
This course will explore key aspects of learning and teaching through examining your own learning processes and those of others, with the goal of applying your knowledge to enhance the learning of all students in a variety of educational settings and contexts. This course includes an additional ten (10) hours of observation by the student in various elementary, middle, and/or secondary school classrooms. In addition to class, an off-campus field component is required. Students cannot take EDUC 2110, EDUC 2120, and EDUC 2130 simultaneously without permission of the Dean.
EDUC 3000 Digital Media for Educators 2 credits
2 class hours
Prerequisite: Permission of the Dean
Designed primarily for teacher candidates this course, students will integrate various digital technologies within instruction. Introduction and effective utilization of Smart boards, web 2.0 technologies (wikis, Google documents, blogs, Skype, social networking etc.), Web page design and construction, audio and video podcasting & editing, and digital photography within instruction to connect with the millennial learner is explored.
EDUC 4300 Special Topics in Education 1 credit
1-3 class hours
Prerequisite: Permission of the Dean
Individual study, readings, research, and/or projects in education under the direction of a faculty member in the Department of Education and Teacher Preparation.
ENGL 0989 Foundations for English Composition 4 credits
4 class hours
Prerequisite: none
This prepares students for college-level reading and writing. Using paired reading and writing assignments that help students work with concepts in context, students will build competency in recognizing, comprehending, and using appropriate grammar, vocabulary, punctuation, and structure in sentences, paragraphs, and essays.
Upon successful completion of this course, students will take the English 1101/English 0999 (gateway/co-requisite) course. Institutional credit only
ENGL 0999 Support for English Composition 1 credit
1 class hour
Prerequisite: none
This course provides extra instruction in the practice and analysis of academic writing. Some portion of the lab will also focus on grammar and mechanics. Access to a computer is required. (One Hour- Institutional credit only)
ENGL 1101 English Composition I 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: None
This is a composition course that focuses on skills required for effective writing in a variety of contexts, with emphasis on exposition, analysis, and argumentation, and also including introductory use of a variety of research skills. The course may be taught in conjunction with a computerized learning lab.
To have ENGL 1101 credit applied toward meeting the requirements of a degree, a student must earn a grade of C or better.
ENGL 1101H Honors English Composition I 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: Permission of the Honors Program Director
English 1101 is a composition course that focuses on skills required for effective writing in a variety of contexts, with emphasis on exposition, analysis, and argumentation, and also including introductory use of a variety of research skills. The course may be taught in conjunction with a computerized learning lab. Honors courses offer more robust coverage of the same content areas delivered through the traditional course format. To have ENGL 1101H credit applied toward meeting the requirements of a degree, a student must earn a grade of C or better.
ENGL 1102 English Composition II 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: ENGL 1101 with a grade C or better
This is a composition course that develops writing skills beyond the levels of proficiency required by English 1101, that emphasizes interpretation and evaluation, and that incorporates a variety of more advanced research methods. To have ENGL 1102 credit applied toward meeting the requirements of a degree, a student must earn a grade of C or better.
ENGL 1102H Honors English Comp II 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: ENGL 1101 or ENGL 1101H with a grade of C or better and Permission of the Honors Program Director
This is a composition course that develops writing skills beyond the levels of proficiency required by English 1101, that emphasizes interpretation and evaluation, and that incorporates a variety of more advanced research methods. Honors courses offer more robust coverage of the same content areas delivered through the traditional course format. To have ENGL 1102 credit applied toward meeting the requirements of a degree, a student must earn a grade of a C or better.
ENGL 2111 World Literature I 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: ENGL 1102 with a C grade or better
This course is a survey of world literature from its ancient foundations to the seventeenth century.
ENGL 2112 World Literature II 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: ENGL 1102 with a grade of C or better
This course is a survey of world literature from the seventeenth century to the present.
ENGL 2130 American Literature 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: ENGL 1102 with a grade of C or better
English 2130 is a one-semester survey of American Literature beginning with the first accounts of the encounters between Native Americans and Europeans, and concluding with contemporary works that address the diversity of literary traditions in the Americas. Honors courses offer more robust coverage of the same content areas delivered through the traditional course format.
ENGL 2130 Honors American Literature 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: ENGL 1102 or ENGL 1102H with a grade of C or better and permission of the Honors Program Director
English 2310H is a one-semester survey of American Literature beginning with the first accounts of the encounters between Native Americans and Europeans, and concluding with contemporary works that address the diversity of literary traditions in the Americas. Honors courses offer more robust coverage of the same content areas delivered through the traditional course format. To have ENGL 2130H credit applied toward meeting the requirements of a degree, a student must earn a grade of C or better.
ENGL 3100 Teaching Writing and Literature in Middle Grades Language Arts 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: ENGL 1102 with a grade of C or better
This course is designed to prepare Language Arts Education majors to effectively teach the critical reading and writing practices appropriate to the Middle Grades ELA classroom as well as improve their own writing skills. The course will cover the structure and elements of a variety of literary genres and forms of informational texts, as well as their cultural/historical aspects. Students will study, learn, and demonstrate techniques for several types of writing (course may include narrative, exposition, analysis, persuasion, and research/documentation). Particular emphasis will be placed on rhetorical awareness (audience, purpose, stance, genre, medium, etc.) and the writing process, including stages such as planning, drafting, revising, and editing.
ENGL 3101 Nineteenth Century British Literature 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: ENGL 2111 or 2112
This course will examine the literacy traditions and cultural movements of 19th Century Britain, including reading and analyses of works of the major figures in Romantic and Victorian literature. Specific works covered may vary with instructor.
ENGL 3102 Twentieth Century British Literature 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: ENGL 2111 or 2112
This course will examine the literacy traditions and cultural movements of twentieth century Britain, including reading and analyses of works of the major figures in Modern and Contemporary literature. Specific works covered may vary with instructor.
ENGL 3107 Intro to Creative Writing: Non-Fiction 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: ENGL 1101 and ENGL 1102
A creative nonfiction workshop focusing on the production and in-class critique of students' creative work and including study of memoir, literary journalism, personal essay, and individual writers. The course involves some written analysis of the work of published writers and, especially, of fellow students' nonfiction prose. Students' creative work will build the required portfolio.
Note: Course may be repeated for up to 6 credits provided the content differs entirely from the previous offering.
ENGL 3150 Intro to Creative Writing: Poetry/Fiction 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: ENGL 1101 and ENGL 1102
A poetry and fiction workshop focusing on the production and in-class critique of students' creative work and including study of poetic forms and movements, elements of fiction, the short story, and individual writers. The course involves some written analysis of the work of published poets and fiction writers and, especially, of fellow students' poems and stories. Students' creative work will build on the required portfolio.
Note: Course may be repeated for up to 6 credits provided the content differs entirely from the previous offering.
ENGL 3201 Survey of Contemporary Literature 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: ENGL 2111 or 2112
Survey of literature that defines the 20th Century, based on writings influenced by major historical and cultural events, new technology, environmental issues, and the changing representation of the self. Specific works covered may vary with Instructor.
ENGL 3202 African American Literature 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: ENGL 2111 or 2112
Focused study of African American literature beginning with the earliest known examples, continuing with slave narratives from the nineteenth century, works from the Harlem Renaissance, the Civil Rights Era and modern classics. Specific works covered may vary with Instructor.
ENGL 3203 Women's Literature 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: ENGL 2111 or 2112
Focused study of women writers, examining themes of power, culture, class, ethnicity, and sexuality. Specific works covered may vary with Instructor.
ENGL 3204 Literature of the American South 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: ENGL 2111 or 2112
Survey of works by Southern writers, with emphasis on nineteenth and twentieth-century fiction, poetry and drama. Specific works covered may vary with Instructor.
ENGL 3205 Survey of Children's and Adolescent Literature 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: ENGL 2111 or 2112
Survey of the literature for children and adolescents, from both the traditional canon and more recent works with particular emphasis on cultural diversity. Texts will include poetry, picture books, fiction and non-fiction. Specific works covered may vary with Instructor. Course is designed for use across the curriculum.
ENGL 3301 Environmental Writing 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: ENGL 2111 or 2112
An examination of the views of nature and the environment presented by writers, poets, and essayists beginning with Thoreau's Walden. Emphasis is placed on environmental writing as a form of civic action--on how various types of environmental writing function as work in our society and on a global scale.
ENGL 3401 Nineteenth Century American Literature 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: ENGL 2111 or 2112
This course will examine the literary traditions and cultural movements of 19th century America, including reading and analyses of works by major American writers that provide a perspective on what constitutes, or makes, American literature American. Specific works covered may vary with instructor.
ENGL 3402 Twentieth Century American Literature 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: ENGL 2111 or 2112
This course will examine the literary traditions and cultural movements of 20th century American, including reading and analyses of works by major American writers that provide a perspective on what constitutes, or makes, American literature American. Specific works covered may vary with instructor.
ENGL 3590 Technical and Professional Communication 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: ENGL 1102
This course is designed to introduce technical communication to students in a variety of disciplines, including health sciences, technology and computer sciences, business, and the humanities. This advanced course in writing familiarizes students with the discourse practices prized in their disciplinary and institutional communities - and helps them to manage those practices effectively in their own written work. In this way the course teaches those writing strategies and tactics professionals will need in order to write successfully on the job.
ENGL 4400 American Rhetorics 3 credits
3 class hours
(Topic options vary when course is taught: Southern Social Rhetorics, Composition Studies, Medical Rhetorics, Environmental Rhetorics, Digital Literacies, etc.) Rhetoric is the study of persuasion and effective discourse. This course focuses on verbal, nonverbal, and symbolic forms of discourse that exist within American culture. Texts and images are rhetorical agents that manipulate and shape past, present, and future American public culture. ENGL 4400 grounds itself in classic and current rhetorical theories; print-based and digital-based artifacts will be used to explore these theories in practice.
Note: Course may be repeated for up to six credits, pending topics offered.
ENGL 4832 Digital Reading & Writing 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: English 2111 or 2112
Writing and reading in digital environments involves weaving text, images, links, interruptions, sound, and video within and across multiple media. Access to information grows daily as globalization offers writers and readers increased audiences, purposes, venues, and feedback options. Digital environments complicate traditional reading, writing, and publication processes, and students will consider and analyze elements of imagery, layout, typography, usability, and most importantly, user interaction.
ESOL 4010 Applied Linguistics for ESOL Teachers 3 credits
3 class hours
A study of the nature, structure, and diversity of language, emphasizing the phonological, morphological, syntactic, and semantic patterns of English in comparison and contract with features of other selected languages. Prospective teachers will explore the principles of linguistic systems and major theorists and schools of linguistic thought. Language acquisition theories as related to language development and learning and their implications for instruction will also be examined within the cultural framework of working with communities of non-native English speakers.
ESOL 4020 Cultural Perspectives for ESOL Teachers 3 credits
3 class hours
Culture and the relationships between culture, language, and education. Prospective ESOL teachers will investigate theories related to the nature and role of culture and cultural groups in the construction of learning environments that support linguistically diverse learners. The course will address developmental aspects of language and literacy with emphasis upon specific ways in which cultural identities affect language learning and school achievement. This course is designed for ESOL endorsement candidates.
ESOL 4030 Methods and Materials for Teaching ESOL 3 credits
3 class hours
Methods for teaching English to elementary-, middle-, and high school-students whose first language is not English. The course content includes theories of language acquisition, instructional strategies and materials, methods of evaluating proficiency and progress, curriculum, and knowledge of professional organizations and resource. This course prepares teachers to respond to the needs of students of limited English proficiency in ESOL and mainstream classrooms.
ESOL 4040 Assessing English Language Learners 3 credits
3 class hours
The application of TESOL theories, principles, and current research to the assessment of P-12 and adult English Language Learners. This course emphasizes the importance of reading and literacy as fundamental factors in second-language acquisition.
ESOL 4050 Teaching English Grammar for ESOL 3 credits
3 class hours
This course offers a survey of practical approaches to teaching grammar to learners of English as a second language based on the application of second language acquisition research and theory. The course also includes a review of common English Language Learner (ELL) grammar questions and errors.
ESOL 4060 Theory and Practice in Second-Language Acquisition 3 credits
3 class hours
Discussion, analysis, and practice of the various theories and models of second-language acquisition.
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FINC 3100 Business Finance 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: ACCT 2101, BUSA 1105, ECON 2105, ECON 2106 with a grade of C or better
This is an introductory course in finance, an understanding of basic financial concepts and techniques, and an ability to apply them in arriving at management decisions within the context of specific business situations.
FINC 3200 Principles of Banking 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: FINC 3100
This course introduces the students to basic principles of banking governing loans, investments, deposits, liabilities, and capital. Consideration is given to the areas of liquidity, profitability, and capital adequacy as they relate to regulatory standards. Additional topics include bank organization, performance, and scope of services.
FINC 3250 Bank Regulation 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: FINC 3200
The regulations imposed upon the banking industry are examined at several levels: state, federal, and global. Both the historical development of banking regulation as well as current issues/controversies are discussed. In addition, the banker's perspective of regulatory compliance is explored.
FINC 3350 Personal Financial Planning and Management 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: None
This course presents concepts and principles of personal financial planning and management including personal financial assessment, goal setting, planning and management of personal assets, credit, insurance, investments, estates and taxes.
FINC 4220 Corporate Finance 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: FINC 3100
This course provides an introduction to various quantitative methods of analysis that informs a firm’s decision to raise capital publically and/or privately. Among other things, various methods for quantifying the risk and returns of various projects and investments are discussed. Students will develop an understanding of basic financial concepts and techniques, and an ability to apply them in arriving at management decisions within the context of specific business situations.
FINC 4230 Securities Analysis 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: FINC 3100
This course examines some of the key assumptions underlying the major areas of investments, i.e. portfolio theory, derivative asset pricing, and asset valuation. It provides a thorough examination of various topics found in the academic as well as financial press.
FINC 4431 Principles of Real Estate 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: FINC 3100
Addresses a real estate transaction in enough depth to guide the student through a transaction with minimal outside help (attorney, etc.). Addresses those economic factors that will affect value to the property through time. In addition, the student will be introduced to several areas of real estate as a possible profession.
FINC 4500 Special topics 1 3 credits
1 class hour
Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit.
Prerequisite: Permission of Department
Special topics courses represent subject matter not covered in other courses in the curriculum. These are generally presented in a classroom setting. This class may be repeated one time with different content.
FINC 4510 Independent Study 1- 3 credits
1 class hour
Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit.
Prerequisite: Permission of Department
This is a customized course, conducted independently, which allows the student to participate in study that represents research, reading, and/or projects that is under the direction of a faculty member of the School of Business and Public Management. (Student must have a minimum of 45 contact hours for the course.) This class may be repeated one time with different content.
FINC 4660 Advanced Corporate Finance 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: FINC 4220
This course provides an in-depth coverage of various quantitative methods of analysis that inform a firm's decision to raise capital publicly and/or privately. This course builds on the knowledge that students acquired in FINC 4220, to develop the knowledge and skills to tackle more complex investment scenarios. Among other things, various methods for quantifying the risk and returns of various projects and investments are discussed. Students will develop an understanding of complex financial concepts and techniques and an ability to apply them in arriving at management decisions within the context of specific business situations.
FREN 1001 Elementary French Language and Introduction to Francophone Cultures I 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: None
Emphasis on the development of proficiency and communicative competence at the novice level in the four basic skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing, as defined by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages Proficiency Guidelines. Awareness of various sociocultural aspects and the distinctiveness of certain cultural traditions. FREN 1001 is not open for credit to students with two or more years of high school French or the equivalent.
FREN 1002 Elementary French Language and Introduction to Francophone Cultures, II 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: FREN 1001 or the equivalent
A continuation of FREN 1001, with emphasis on proficiency and communicative competence at the novice level in the four basic skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing, as defined by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages Proficiency Guidelines. Awareness of various sociocultural aspects and the distinctiveness of certain cultural traditions.
FREN 2001 Intermediate French Language and Introduction to Francophone Cultures, I 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: FREN 1002 or the equivalent
Emphasis on the development of proficiency and communicative competence at the intermediate level in the four basic skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing, as defined by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages Proficiency Guidelines. Awareness and understanding of various sociocultural aspects and the distinctiveness of certain cultural traditions.
FREN 2002 Intermediate French Language and Introduction to Francophone Cultures, II 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: FREN 2001 or the equivalent
A continuation of FREN 2001, with emphasis on proficiency and communicative competence at the intermediate level in the four basic skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing, as defined by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages Proficiency Guidelines. Awareness and understanding of various sociocultural aspects and the distinctiveness of certain cultural traditions.
FREN 2010 Intermediate Conversation 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: FREN 2002 or the equivalent
A study of conversational techniques, integrating grammatical structures and appropriate vocabulary. Emphasis is given to practicing spoken French and to using audio programs to increase listening comprehension. Attention is also given to pronunciation and phonetics.
FREN 3001 French Conversation 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: FREN 2001 or Instructor approval
A study of conversational techniques, integrating grammatical structures and appropriate vocabulary. Emphasis is given to practicing spoken French and to using audio programs to increase listening comprehension. Attention is also given to pronunciations and phonetics.
FREN 3002 French Composition 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: FREN 2002 or Instructor approval
A thorough review and expansion of the main grammatical concepts, rules and applications studied in FREN 1001, 1002, 2001, and 2002 courses. A practical application of grammar study through translations (English to French), formal/informal writing, listening and speaking, and refinement of self-editing skills.
FREN 3150 French Culture and Civilization 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: FREN 2002 or Instructor approval
A survey of the historical, sociological, philosophical, literary, and artistic developments of France and neighboring French-speaking European countries up to modern times.
FREN 3160 Francophone Culture and Civilization 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: FREN 2002 or Instructor approval
A survey of the historical, sociological, philosophical, literary, and artistic developments of the Francophone world.
FREN 3201 Approaches to Literature 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: FREN 2002 or Instructor approval
The development of students' reading and writing skills along with knowledge of the major literary genres and literary thought. Texts are from traditional and contemporary sources (selections of prose, poetry, and theater).
FREN 3250 Survey of French Literature from the Middle Ages to the Present 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: FREN 2002 or Instructor approval
Selected major literary works, authors, and literary movements of France from the Middle Ages to the present.
FREN 3260 Survey of Francophone Literature 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: FREN 2002 or Instructor approval.
Selected major literary works, authors, and literary movements of the Francophone world.
FREN 3300 French Phonetics and Phonology 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: FREN 2002 or Instructor approval
Study of phonetic principles and their applications.
FREN 3400 Culture, Business, and Society in the Francophone World 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: FREN 2002 or Instructor approval
A study of culture as it relates to business practices in the French speaking world. A variety of authentic media sources will be used. Emphasis will be put on listening comprehension and translation as well as on business correspondence.
FREN 4001 Advanced French Conversation 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: FREN 2002 or Instructor approval
An advanced study of spoken and written French, with emphasis on oral and written communication strategies, including the interpersonal and presentational modes, for communication in Francophone contexts.
FREN 4002 French Composition 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: FREN 2002 or Instructor approval
An advanced study of grammar, syntax, and vocabulary with refinement of writing skills through composition.
FREN 4210 Business French 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: FREN 2002 or Instructor approval
An introduction to the economic and business practices of contemporary France and the Francophone world.
FREN 4800 Special Topics 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: FREN 2002 or Instructor approval
Special topics in French and Francophone language, literature, civilization, or culture. May be repeated up to a maximum of 9 hours if topics are different.
FREN 4950 Directed Study 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: FREN 2002 or Instructor approval.
Study in an area or topic of Francophone literature or the French language not normally found in established courses offered by the department. The work is done under the supervision of a professor.
FREN 4960 Study Abroad Special Topic 3 credits
3 class hours
Consult the Instructor regarding arrangements, requirements, and credit. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 hours if topics are different.
FREN 4980 Community Practicum/Internship 3 credits
3 class hours
Graded Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory.
A practical application of students' skills in French. Students will either tutor students enrolled in public or private schools or complete a research project that requires extensive use of all language skills. This course may be repeated for up to 9 credit hours. Course is elective and will be graded S/U.
FREN 4991 Senior Seminar 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: Senior Standing.
An all-inclusive communication skills course. This course focuses on the four basic skills: reading, writing, listening and speaking.
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GEOG 1101 Introduction to Human Geography 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: None
This course is a survey of global patterns of resources, population, culture, and economic systems. Emphasis is placed upon the factors contributing to these patterns and the distinctions between the technologically advanced and less advanced regions of the world.
GEOG 3101 World Geography 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: GEOG 1101
Study of the earth, including basic geology and the cartographic investigation of climate, topography, natural resources, and socio-cultural and political variables.
GEOL 1121 Physical Geology 4 credits
3 class hours, 2 laboratory hours
This course covers Earth materials and processes.
GEOL 1122 Historical Geology 4 credits
3 class hours, 2 laboratory hours
This course covers geological time, sedimentary environments, fossils, and Earth history.
GEOL 3200 Foundations of Ocean Atmospheric Science 4 credits
3 class hours, 2 lab hours
Prerequisite: Completion of Area D with C or better
This course is open only to qualified students in the School of Education and Teacher Preparation. The course is a study of the ocean and atmosphere: composition, structure, energy budget, dynamics, and their influence on weather and climate.
GLOB 1001 Global Issues 1 credit
2 class hours
Prerequisite: None
This course is an introduction to issues and ideas of international significance as they relate to U.S. culture (e.g., physical environment, status of women, the family, crime/terrorism, and economic development).
GLOB 1001H Honors Global Issues 1 credit
1 class hour
Prerequisite: Permission of the Honors Program Director
Co-requisite: HON 1101
This is an introduction to issues and ideas of international significance. Students will be challenged to engage in an interdisciplinary centered dialogue on a contemporary issue using critical thinking and global awareness. This course is intended to expand the student’s perspective by encountering divergent points of view. The course is also intended to model and practice the intellectual exchange necessary to understand and meaningfully contribute to ongoing interdisciplinary dialogue. Honors courses offer more robust coverage of the same content areas delivered through the traditional course format.
GRMN 1001 Elementary German I 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: None
This course will develop your 4 communicative skills--speaking, listening, reading and writing---so as to give the student a basic proficiency in German (cf. ACTFL Novice Guidelines). Additionally, the class is designed to increase your knowledge of German culture through the materials presented for reading and conversation.
GRMN 1002 Elementary German II 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: GRMN 1001 or at least one year of German in high school
This course will develop your 4 communicative skills--speaking, listening, reading and writing---so as to give the student a basic proficiency in German (cf. ACTFL Novice Guidelines). Additionally, the class is designed to increase your knowledge of German culture through the materials presented for reading and conversation.
GRMN 2001 Intermediate German I 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: GRMN 1002 or at least two years of German in high school
This course will develop your 4 communicative skills--speaking, listening, reading and writing---so as to give the student a basic proficiency in German (cf. ACTFL Novice Guidelines). Additionally, the class is designed to increase your knowledge of German culture through the materials presented for reading and conversation.
GRMN 2002 Intermediate German II 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: GRMN 2001 or at least three years of German in high school
This course will develop your 4 communicative skills--speaking, listening, reading and writing---so as to give the student a basic proficiency in German (cf. ACTFL Novice Guidelines). Additionally, the class is designed to increase your knowledge of German culture through the materials presented for reading and conversation.
GRMN 3070 Business and Political German I 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: GRMN 2002 or Instructor approval
This course is an overview of Germany's contemporary political scene and economic position, Germany’s role in the European Union, comparative German and American business culture, Germany's economic relationship with the United States and the global economy. We will learn communication skills for use in the German-speaking workplace and practical tools, such as writing a German résumé, writing a cover letter for a job application, and how to conduct a business conversation on the phone.
GRMN 3080 Business and Political German II 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: GRMN 2002 or Instructor approval.
Further develops the themes of Business German, with increasing emphasis on personal and group project development and a high level of German linguistic and cultural competence. Students will explore German politics and companies in detail, research case histories, and follow recent developments, trends, and conflicts in the German and European political/economic scene.
GRMN 3110 Germania 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: GRMN 3010 or GRMN 3070
This course explores the historical, cultural, and literary roots of the Germanic world between the Bronze and Viking ages. We will study ancient Germanic religions and mythologies; runic inscriptions; the Roman-Germanic encounter; the Age of Migrations; early medieval Germanic kingdoms; Christianization; Germanic heroic ethos and epic; and 19th & 20th century uses and abuses of the Germanic legacy.
GRMN 3310 Intermediate Reading 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: GRMN 2002 or Instructor approval
The course will develop students’proficiency in spoken and written German. The readings will be based on material fromcontemporary sources, including prose, poetry, and theater.
GRMN 3320 Intermediate German Grammar and Composition 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: GRMN 3020 or GRMN 3080
This course will continue students’ study of the major difficulties of German Grammar with practice in composition.
GRMN 3540 German Popular Literature 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: GRMN 3310 or consent of instructor
Study of lyrical forms, such asthe ballads and poems of selected major authors and the lyrics of the common peopleover several centuries. A study of prose forms of popular literature, such as fairy tales andcontemporary children’s books.
GRMN 3551 German Culture and Civilization I 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: GRMN 2002 or Instructor approval.
This introductory cultural studies course acquaints you with central social, cultural and political issues of post-war Germany. Our textbook is designed as a course for foreigners wishing to become German citizens. We are therefore becoming familiar with pertinent aspects of German culture from this unique and authentic vantage point. Our course also includes systematic grammar review. This class hones all your language skills (reading, writing, listening, and speaking) while simultaneously teaching cultural content. It is a gateway course structured to prepare you for higher-level German classes.
GRMN 4410 Advanced German Conversation and Composition 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: GRMN 3020 or GRMN 3080
This course will be refining your command of spoken and written German. The focus will be on developing a more sophisticated range of vocabulary and expressions, and obtaining more ease in dealing with the finer points of German grammar. A significant part of class time is spent on developing speaking skills. The course is structured around four movies and shorter clips which we will discuss in detail based on student input.
GRMN 4510 Special Topics 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: GRMN 2002 or Instructor approval.
Special topics in German language, literature, civilization, or culture. May be repeated up to a maximum of 9 hours if topics are different.
GRMN 3552 German Culture and Civilization II 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: GRMN 2002 or Instructor approval.
German 3552 is designed to increase your competency in interpretive, interpersonal and presentational communication as well as your understanding of contemporary German culture. More specifically, you will increase your active and passive vocabulary. This will improve your comprehension of spoken and written German and enable you to speak German more fluently. We will review elements of German grammar to improve your confidence and accuracy as you use the German language. The course exposes you to texts of various genres (including podcasts) to help you hone your interpretation skills while gaining a richer understanding of German culture.
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HINF 2000 Medical Terminology 2 credits
2 class hours
Prerequisite: None
This course is an introduction to medical terminology, including root words, prefixes, suffixes, and combining forms. The course includes the proper pronunciation and use of medical terms in medical reports as well as an introduction to commonly used drugs. Emphasis is on correct spelling and use of medical terms in the healthcare environment.
HINF 3000 Foundations of Health Informatics 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: HINF 2000, and BIOL 1130 or equivalent, or Instructor Permission
This course is an overview of the field of health informatics. It provides coverage of the status of and trends about the field's origins and development. Students discuss patient informatics, electronic health records, health related data structures, software applications, enterprise architecture in health care and public health organizations. The concept of meaningful use is introduced and the importance of data quality assessment, data standards, data integrity, HIPPA, privacy confidentiality health care decision support methods and related technologies are discussed. The concepts of human factors and user interface are introduced.
HINF 3001 Overview of the US Health Care System 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: BIOL 1130 or equivalent, and POLS 1101
The course provides a survey of how health care and public health are organized and services delivered, regulated and financed in the US. It includes a brief introduction to health care delivery systems in other developed countries. Heath policy and the history of health care reform efforts are addressed as well as relevant organizations and the interrelationships of those organizations including legal, regulatory and payment systems. Discussions also focus on how health care is organized in various settings including hospitals, and medical practice settings as well as trends in e health care. The role of regulatory bodies including the federal government, the state government, JCAHO and other industry regulatory entities are reviewed. Students are introduced to the roles of various professionals and ethical issues encountered in the work place including research guidelines, research review boards and the National Guideline regarding human subjects in research.
HINF 3100 Principles of Project Management in Health Care 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: MATH 1111 or equivalent, and HINF 3000, or Permission of instructor
Due to recent transformation of health care and advancement in health care information technology, projects in health informatics (HI) require a unique approach to management and administration. The course covers knowledge areas and tools necessary for successful management and completion of HI related projects. Starting from project pre-initiation and selection process, this course also stresses the life cycle of health care information technology (HIT) projects and how to apply appropriate knowledge areas in various phrases of HIT project's life cycle for integrated project management. Students are expected to complete a semester long team project relevant to HI.
HINF 3300 Healthcare Information Systems 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: HINF 3000, BISM 3135, and ITEC 3730, or permission of instructor
Information systems have become a key factor in the effective operation and competitive position of health care and other organizations. This course focuses on various aspects of health care information systems from both general and in-depth systems perspective which includes applications, components, vendor selection, design, and implementation details. This course also emphasizes electronic health records and issues related to health data exchanges among various providers. Data standards such as HL7 and other industry compliance standards and terminologies and their roles in health care delivery in electronic environment are also covered. Legal issues are also discussed in depth. Integration of technologies to advance the quality and efficiency of patient care as well as to improve organizational performance, individual health care and community health through the use of health care information systems are also emphasized.
HINF 3310 Electronic Health Records 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: HINF 3000, BISM 3135, and ITEC 3730, or Permission of instructor
Electronic health record (EHR) is a vital component of any health care information system. This course focuses on various aspects of EHR including plan, selection, design, implementation, applications, training and management of EHR systems within various health care settings. Emphasis is also on how health data are collected, documented and maintained in various electronic environments. Various standards and terminologies, interface methods, industry compliance programs as well as Meaningful use relevant to EHR design and implementation are also covered. Several industry level EHR systems are introduced and roles of EHR in health care decision making and health information exchange are also emphasized.
HINF 4100 Health Care Policy 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: MGMT 3100, HINF 3000, Senior Standing
This course will engage students in critically thinking about health policymaking and analysis that shapes the development, implementation and changes in health policy at the federal and state level. Lectures, readings and assignments will define health policy, provide an overview of the state and federal policy making process, investigate approaches and methods for analyzing health policy as well as strategies for influencing health policy. Students will examine the history of health policy making as well as restrictions and limitations that influence the delivery of healthcare.
HINF 4250 Healthcare Finance 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: ACCT 2101, ECON 2106, HINF 3000 and HINF 3001, or Permission of instructor
This course focuses on financial management of health care organizations. It includes budget preparation, financial statements and reports, financial analysis and health resources management, health care costs, and various regulations related to financial management in health care settings. Special emphasis will also be put on Medicare, Medicaid and other third party billing and reimbursement process including rate schedule, financial forecasting, cost-benefit ratio analysis and financial aspects of health care projects.
HINF 4320 Health Data Analysis 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: CSCI 1301, HINF 3300, MATH 2112, or Permission of instructor
Health care decision making depends on analysis of large health related datasets and effective interpretation and representation of the results. This course focuses on health care related data analysis which includes various sources and uses of health data, various data types and classification procedures, common data collection tools and methodologies used in health care and basic applied statistical methods and procedures commonly used in health related data analysis. Health care industry level statistical data analysis software package such as SAS is introduced as well as how to utilize this package to analyze various secondary datasets in order to produce and represent appropriate results in various report formats are discussed.
HINF 4100 Health Policy 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: HINF 3001
This course will engage students in critically thinking about health policymaking and analysis that shapers the development, implementation and changes in health policy at the federal and state level. Lectures, readings and assignments will define health policy, provide an overview of the state and federal policymaking process, investigate approaches and methods for analyzing health policy as well as strategies for influencing health policy. Students will examine the history of health policymaking as well as restrictions and limitations that influence the delivery of health care.
HINF 4325 Principles of Health Care Quality and Continuous Improvement 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: HINF 3310, MATH 2112, HINF 4250, or Permission of Instructor
This course introduces concepts of continuous improvement (CI) and quality management (QM) approaches in today's information-driven health care organizations for delivery of care. Students address benefits and challenges in managing customer satisfaction benchmarking, performance measurement, QFD, statistical quality process, and related CI and QM activities. Methods for assessing utilization and resource management and other performance standards to improve quality are discussed. Regulatory standards and accreditation standards are reviewed in the context of their role to ensure quality. Various approaches to outcomes measurement and organizational performance are also discussed. The broader principles of ethics including data ownership, beneficial use, justice and autonomy are also discussed.
HINF 4350 Decision Support in Health Care 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: HINF 3300, HINF 3310 and HINF 4320, or Permission of Instructor
Diverse models and methods of decision making and decision support have been developed and implemented in health care settings to help health professionals make better decisions. This course reviews theories, methods, and technologies for aiding the process of decision making in health care. This course provides the means for helping students make a more informed assessment of data type and quality essential for decision making as well as the relative benefits and constraints of applications used to support information-driven decision making in health care organizations. Emphasis is on clinical decision support techniques in various health care settings. Students review leading developments in health informatics relevant to decision support and apply concepts of planning analysis and design, customization, integration, testing, evaluation, auditing and monitoring of decision support systems to deepen their understanding of decision support.
HINF 4370 Health Information Exchange 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: ITEC 3200, ITEC 3830, HINF 3300, HINF 3310, or Permission of instructor
This course introduces various aspects of electronic health information exchange (HIE) in information driven health care. Emphasis is on various standards governing HIE, health information organizations (HIO'S), privacy, confidentiality, and security issues related to HIE, strategies, planning and formation of HIE's, HIE's impact on delivery of health care. Students are expected to complete case studies and relevant projects in HIE.
HINF 4400 Advanced Database Management Systems 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: ITEC 3730, ITEC 3830, or Permission of instructor
This course builds on the concepts covered in ITEC 3730 Database Management Systems. This course focuses on more advanced topics in relational database management systems (RDBMS) and various integrated database applications in health care. Emphasis will be put on advanced query language, database security, web-based interface design, client server systems that utilize back-end relational database, XML based database applications. Students are expected to complete a specific health care database management system project, which includes assessing requirements to design and implementation of a database, and designing appropriate web-interfaces to interact with the database. Concepts of data ware housing and data mining will also be introduced.
HINF 4500 Special topics 1 3 credits
1 class hour
Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit.
Prerequisite: Permission of Department
Special topics courses represent subject matter not covered in other courses in the curriculum. These are generally presented in a classroom setting. This class may be repeated one time with different content.
HINF 4510 Independent Study 1 3 credits
1 class hour
Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit
Prerequisite: Permission of Department
This is a customized course, conducted independently, which allows the student to participate in study that represents research, reading, and/or projects that is under the direction of a faculty member of the School of Business and Public Management. (Student must have a minimum of 45 contact hours for the course.) This class may be repeated one time with different content.
HINF 4900 Health Informatics Internship 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: Senior-year standing in BSHI
This course provides the student with a minimum of 120 hours of supervised work experience in a healthcare setting. Students are supervised by Health Informatics faculty and the person or persons designated to coordinate the internship. Preceptors are identified to work with students at each field learning site. An initial proposal is required for approval by the faculty. The objective is to develop hands on experience of working with health care professionals, understanding the needs and challenges of the field and gaining hands on experience with applications currently in the market.
HIST 1001 World Civilization I 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: None
This course is a study of the development of human civilization from its origins in various regions of the world to about 1500 A.D. The political, social, cultural, and religious practices of various world cultures will be studied.
HIST 1002 World Civilization II 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: None
This course is a survey of Modern World History from 1500 A.D. to present. Social, economic, religious, and cultural issues along with political developments of various world cultures will be studied.
HIST 2111 U.S. History I 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: None
This course is a survey of American history covering the period 1492-1865 with the most emphasis placed upon the period after 1763. Satisfactory completion of this course fulfills the graduation requirement of proficient knowledge of the history of the United States and Georgia.
HIST 2111H Honors U.S. History I 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: Permission of the Honors Program Director
This is a survey of American history covering the period 1492-1865 with the most emphasis placed upon the period after 1763. Satisfactory completion of this course fulfills the graduation requirement of proficient knowledge of the history of the United States and Georgia. Honors courses offer more robust coverage of the same content areas delivered through the traditional course format. Thus, the honors course version will include directed readings of primary source materials to complement advanced level lectures. Students will lead discussion groups to synthesize readings with lecture materials.
HIST 2112 U.S. History II 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: None
This course is designed to be a brief survey of the major developments in the history of the United States since 1865. Special emphasis will be given to the significance of the State of Georgia at various stages in its development. Satisfactory completion of this course fulfills the graduation requirement of proficient knowledge of the history of the United States and Georgia.
HIST 3073 Modern America, 1945 to Present 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: None
Social, economic, diplomatic, and political trends in the United States during the post-World War II era.
HIST 3050 American Indian History to 1840 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: None
Explores the impact of colonization on Native Americans to 1840. The course will focus on the creative adaptations of Indians to the great changes unleashed by the meeting of the new and old worlds.
HIST 3090 The American South 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: None
Major themes and issues in southern history from Jamestown through the 1980s. Topics will include colonial settlement, frontier expansion, slavery, the Civil War and Reconstruction, Populism, Jim Crow, the New South, the civil rights movement and Sunbelt development.
HIST 3101 History of Georgia 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: HIST 2111 or 2112
Study of the history of Georgia focusing on pre-colonial, state and local history and the connection with national events. This course fulfills the legislative requirement for Georgia history.
HIST 3160 American Environmental History 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: HIST 2111 or HIST 2112
This course examines the historical interactions between Americans and the natural environment from before European exploration and settlement until the present. The course particularly focuses on how nature has shaped human history, how humans have transformed the natural world, and how ideas about nature have changed over time.
HIST 3201 History of Women in the United States 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: HIST 2111 or 2112
Study of women and their central role in US History with particular attention to race, religion, and class.
HIST 3315 U.S. Economic History 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: ECON 2105 and ECON 2106
This course explores the growth and development of the U.S. economy from colonial times to the present. The course emphasizes the structural change in key sectors, such as agriculture, transportation, and manufacturing, as well as crucial events, such as the Civil War and the Great Depression, that shaped the pace and pattern of U.S. economic development.
HIST 3321 Diplomatic History of the United States 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites:
Examines major trends in U.S. diplomacy from 1890 to the present, emphasizing U.S. rise to world power, World Wars I and II, the Cold War and its end, and U.S. relations with developing world areas.
HIST 3332 U.S. Social and Cultural History 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: HIST 2111 or 2112
For the years 1492 to present, consideration will be given to nationality, immigration, ethnicity (Asian-Americans, Hispanic-Americans, and Middle Eastern-Americans), the elderly, popular culture, and the environment.
HIST 4000 Studies in American History 3 credits
3 class hours
A special subject not otherwise offered in the history curriculum. Topics, methodology, and instructors vary from semester to semester. Representative topics include Women, Private Property, and the State, Marx and Marxist History, and Slave Religions. Repeatable for up to 9 credit hours.
HIST 4101 American Political History 3 credits
3 class hours
Examines the political history of America, specifically, the development of the major parties, debates over the structure of government, government’s role in the economy, and civil rights for various groups.
HIST 4170 The Atlantic World 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: HIST 2111 or 2112
This course is an examination of the shared history of Europe, Africa, and the Americas during the period of colonization and globalization. Between the era of exploration and the age of revolutions, these civilizations interacted through conquest, trade, emigration, and cultural exchange, giving rise to a distinctly Atlantic World.
HIST 4412 The Early Republic 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: HIST 2111
This course will explore the history of the United States from 1787 – 1824. Topics and issues covered will include the creation of the Constitution, the formation of the first party system, the growth and development of the federal government, the young republic’s foreign policy, the War of 1812, the Market Revolution, the Era of Good Feelings, and the development of a uniquely American culture. Social, economic, political, and military aspects of the American experience will be addressed.
HIST 4461 Gilded Age & Progressive Era 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: HIST 2112
The examination of the expansion, industrialization, and urbanization of the United States in the late 19th and early 20th centuries and of the era’s cultural, political, economic, intellectual, and social issues.
HIST 4472 The Rise of Modern America 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: HIST 2112
Explores the social, political, cultural, economic, and diplomatic history of the U.S. from the end of World War I to the end of World War II.
HON 1101 Honors Seminar 2 credits
2 class hours
Prerequisite: Permission of the Honors Program Director
Co-Requisite: GLOB 1101H
Honors Seminar is a two credit-hour course that introduces first-year honors students to higher education and to the expectations and opportunities that come with membership in the College of Coastal Georgia community of teachers and students. This course is designed to help students develop strategies for academic, career, and personal success by developing a philosophy of personal and professional leadership grounded in global awareness, a commitment to service, and a rigorous engagement with questions of enduring significance to the human condition.
HOSP 1106 Introduction to Hospitality 3 credits
3 class hours
An introductory course which gives the student and overview of the hospitality industry and its characteristics
HOSP 2104 Hospitality Law 3 credits
3 class hours
This course is the study of legal issues that are an integral part of every hotel organization from hiring and firing employees to guest safety and tax regulations. Topics covered include basic legal principles governing hospitality operations, laws that affect a hotel's dealing with employees, and how building codes and public health regulations apply to hotels.
HOSP 2105 Practicum 3 credits
6 laboratory hours
Prerequisite: Completion of all other hospitality courses or Permission of Instructor
This course provides students with the opportunity to utilize the skills learned in a hands on situation.
HOSP 2108 Hotel/Motel Management 3 credits
3 class hours
The study of organization, planning, leadership and controlling of hotels. Also investigated will be the interdependence of the housekeeping, engineering, security, food and beverage, marketing and human resource departments in successful hotel operations.
HOSP 2109 Nutrition 3 credits
3 class hours
The basic principles of nutrition are discussed from the standpoint of how the food service industry must assume some responsibility for providing a healthy, nutritional food supply. The life cycle of a human being is also studied from a nutritional needs standpoint. How to write menus from this varying viewpoint is discussed.
HOSP 2110 Hospitality Marketing 3 credits
3 class hours
This course introduces students to marketing techniques associated with hotel, restaurant, and travel fields with emphasis on identifying and satisfying needs of customers. Topics include an introduction to marketing, market research and analysis, marketing strategies, marketing plans, salesmanship, and advertising.
HOSP 3120 Hospitality and Entertainment Law 3 credits
3 class hours
This course provides an understanding of laws and regulations that apply to the hospitality and entertainment industry. The management of legal issues and liabilities faced by hospitality managers and agents is developed. Contract law and negotiations are also discussed. Rights and obligations of guests in the food and lodging are presented.
HOSP 3100 Fundamentals of Tourism 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: HOSP 1106, HISP 2108
This course explores the concept that tourism can be seen as an inter-linked industry composed of many sectors of the private economy and the public sector. Business principles are applied to the unique nature of tourism. Tourism is also explored as a basic foundation of coastal economic development.
HOSP 4100 Econ Tourism 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: MGMT 3140, HOSP 3100
Coastal areas are sites of a unique form of tourism. Eco tourism focuses on the importance of natural sites, ecological and environmental assets as attractions. Logistical challenges of the movement and control of tourists/customers are developed. In interaction of human with the natural environment is also considered.
HOSP 4500 Special topics 1 3 credits
1 class hour
Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit.
Prerequisite: Permission of Department
Special topics courses represent subject matter not covered in other courses in the curriculum. These are generally presented in a classroom setting. This class may be repeated one time with different content.
HOSP 4510 Independent Study 1 3 credits
1 class hour
Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit.
Prerequisite: Permission of Department
This is a customized course, conducted independently, which allows the student to participate in study that represents research, reading, and/or projects that is under the direction of a faculty member of the School of Business and Public Management. (Student must have a minimum of 45 contact hours for the course.) This class may be repeated one time with different content.
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IDIS 1102 Foundations of Interdisciplinary Studies 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: ENGL 1101
This course begins by examining what an academic discipline is, how bodies of knowledge are treated in different disciplines, and what it means to be interdisciplinary. Students learn how diverse approaches to knowledge transcend the limitations of a single discipline approach. This course is the introductory foundations course for the Bachelors of Science in Interdisciplinary Studies degree, offering a starting point for Interdisciplinary enquiry, basic research methods and opportunities to explore interdisciplinary.
IDIS 3900 Interdisciplinary Methods 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: ENGL 1102, Sophomore Standing or permission of instructor
This course introduces students to the current methods and practices in interdisciplinary research in the humanities and social sciences. The course focuses on concepts, analysis, and diverse research practices (which may include methods of historical research, ethnography, literary criticism, and data collection and analysis). The course emphasizes secondary research, but students will be introduced to the methods of primary research and the ethical treatment of human subjects as those methods apply to interdisciplinary scholarship.
INST 1000 International Perspectives 1 credit
1-6 class hours
Prerequisite: None
This course is designed to enhance and enrich the educational experience of students who travel abroad in a program sanctioned by the College of Coastal Georgia. It will provide students with an introduction to the culture(s) to be visited, an understanding and appreciation of the importance of the specific sites on the itinerary, and practical advice for the inexperienced traveler. The course will require classroom attendance, travel to the country studied, and necessary expenses.
INST 2000 International Studies 3 credits
3 or 6 or 9 class hours
Prerequisite: None
International Study 2000 is used for students studying abroad in University System sanctioned foreign study opportunities operated by units of the University System of Georgia. The course content will be determined by the title assigned by the office of the Registrar.
INST 3000 International Studies 3 credits
3 or 6 or 9 class hours
Prerequisites: Will be specific to the course title applied
International Study 3000 is used for students studying abroad in University System sanctioned foreign study opportunities operated by units of the University System of Georgia. The course content will be determined by the title assigned by the office of the Registrar.
INST 4000 International Studies 3 credits
3 or 6 or 9 class hours
Prerequisites: Will be specific to the course title applied
International Study 4000 is used for students studying abroad in University System sanctioned foreign study opportunities operated by units of the University System of Georgia. The course content will be determined by the title assigned by the office of the Registrar.
ISCI 2001 Life/Earth Science 3 credits
2 class hours, 2 laboratory hours
Prerequisite: Completion of all CPC and Learning Support Requirements
This is an activity-based and inquiry-based Area F content course designed for early childhood education majors. This course will emphasize the characteristics of life, biodiversity/heredity, energy flow, the interdependence of life, the cell, earth systems, the lithosphere, the hydrosphere, and the biosphere. These topics are in direct correlation with the Georgia Performance Standards (GPS) K-5.
ISCI 2002 Physical Science 3 credits
2 class hours, 2 laboratory hours
Prerequisite: Completion of all CPC?and Learning Support Requirements
This is an activity-based and inquiry-based Area F content course designed for early childhood education majors. This course will emphasize the concepts of matter, energy, force, and fields. These topics are in direct correlation with the Georgia Performance Standards (GPS) for K-5.
ITAL 1001 Elementary Italian I 3 credits
3 class Hours
Prerequisite: None
This course will develop your 4 communicative skills--speaking, listening, reading and writing---so as to give the student a basic proficiency in Italian (cf. ACTFL Novice Guidelines). Additionally, the class is designed to increase your knowledge of Italic culture through the materials presented for reading and conversation.
ITAL 1002 Elementary Italian II 3 credits
3 class Hours
Prerequisite: ITAL 1001 or Testing
This course will develop your 4 communicative skills--speaking, listening, reading and writing---so as to give the student a basic proficiency in Italian (cf. ACTFL Novice Guidelines). Additionally, the class is designed to increase your knowledge of Italic culture through the materials presented for reading and conversation.
ITAL 2001 Intermediate Italian I 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: ITAL 1002 or Testing
This course will develop your 4 communicative skills--speaking, listening, reading and writing---so as to give the student a basic proficiency in Italian (cf. ACTFL Novice Guidelines). Additionally, the class is designed to increase your knowledge of Italic culture through the materials presented for reading and conversation.
ITAL 2002 Intermediate Italian II 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: ITAL 2001 or Testing
This course will develop your 4 communicative skills--speaking, listening, reading and writing---so as to give the student a basic proficiency in Italian (cf. ACTFL Novice Guidelines). Additionally, the class is designed to increase your knowledge of Italic culture through the materials presented for reading and conversation.
ITEC 1310 Introduction to Internet and Wide Area Networks 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: CSCI 1201
This course introduces the Internet, a nationwide computer network that links colleges, businesses and government agencies. Provides an excellent opportunity to understand, investigate and explore the Internet as well as how to use communications software to access the many resources available on the network. Topics include network fundamentals, Internet concepts, electronic mail, file transfer protocol (FTP), Telnet, Internet gophers, and information servers.
ITEC 2100 Computer Applications for Business 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: None
This course introduces the student to computer applications most commonly used in the business world. Coverage focuses predominately on the use of the MSWord, Excel, and PowerPoint. Introduction to MS Access, Application used in Accounting, and statistical analysis will also be covered.
ITEC 3110 Business Analysis using Computer Applications 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: ITEC 2100
This course provides an intermediate treatment of advanced Office applications. Students examine and develop intermediate level proficiency in MS-Word, PowerPoint, and Excel. Students also apply this learning to a project in which they either write a professional-level report in Word with embedded tables and references, develop a new presentation with intermediate features, or develop a new/original spreadsheet for an organization in the community.
ITEC 3200 Computer Networks 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: CSCI 1201, CSCI 1301 or Permission of instructor
This is an introductory course that emphasizes on basic computer networking concepts and applications. Specific emphasis is on an in-depth overview of all aspects of computer networks which includes network design, LAN, WAN, topologies, architecture, protocols, error resolution, network addressing, network security and data communication within the network. Wireless networking and overall information exchange concepts will also be introduced.
ITEC 3730 Database Management Systems 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: CSCI 1301 or equivalent or Permission of Instructor
This course is an overview of the fundamentals of relational database design and management systems. This course emphasizes on ER modeling, database architecture, functional dependencies and relational design, relational algebra for basic query structure, Structured Query Language (SQL), query processing and transaction, concurrency and recovery, and database application development using one of the relational database management systems (RDBMS).
ITEC 3830 Web Programming 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: CSCI 1302, ITEC 3730 or Permission of instructor
This course emphasizes on both client-side and server-side programming of web page construction through hands-on assignments. Specific emphasis is on various mark-up and scripting languages as well as various technologies relevant to dynamic web page construction and web based applications development. Various web development environments will be discussed and utilized. Some of the sample topics include HTML, xHTML, CSS, Common Gateway Interface (CGI)/PERL, PHP, ASP, C#, JavaScript, XML, Document Object Model (DOM), .NET environment and other relevant topics.
ITEC 4500 Special topics 1 3 credits
1 class hour
Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit.
Prerequisite: Permission of Department
Special topics courses represent subject matter not covered in other courses in the curriculum. These are generally presented in a classroom setting. This class may be repeated one time with different content.
ITEC 4510 Independent Study 1 3 credits
1 class hour
Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit.
Prerequisite: Permission of Department
This is a customized course, conducted independently, which allows the student to participate in study that represents research, reading, and/or projects that is under the direction of a faculty member of the School of Business and Public Management. (Student must have a minimum of 45 contact hours for the course.) This class may be repeated one time with different content.
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JOUR 1000 Journalism Practicum 2 credits
2 or 4 laboratory hours
Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor. Repeatable for maximum 8 hours credit.
This course is a practical application of the principles of reporting, interviewing, writing, photography, editing, art, and layout and design through production of a college publication. It is open to all students who are members of the staff of a campus publication. The course may be taken for one or two hours of credit. Credit does not apply toward degree requirements.
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LEAD 3000 Foundations of Leadership 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: BUSA 1105
This course examines the process of leadership, delineating the leaders’ responsibility within that process. From historical to current leadership theories, leadership principles and theoretical concepts are addressed. Focus is on real world and present day application and the implications to organizations and to leaders. This course examines the development of leadership theories and approaches and their role in contemporary organizations. It also examines the differences between management and leadership and why those differences are important to the health of organizations.
LEAD 3100 Personal Leadership Development 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: BUSA 1105
This course is designed to be an interactive exploration of personal leadership development. Through the introduction of current theories and models, you will increase your understanding of leadership, examine how attitudes about yourself and others influence leadership behavior, and stimulate the development of new skills through demonstration and practice. The course considers leadership topics from three perspectives: the individual, the group, and the society. Readings, discussions, reflections, and experiential activities will examine self-development and understanding, group dynamics, change, ethics, and teamwork.
LEAD 4000 Leadership of Non-Profit Organizations and Social Enterprises 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: BUSA 1105
This course examines the leadership challenges of creating and sustaining high performing nonprofit organizations. The operating environment for nonprofit organizations is changing as dynamically as that of the for-profit sector. This course enables the student to both examine the applicability of for-profit business approaches to nonprofit organizational challenges as well as to identify entrepreneurial and innovative solutions to these challenges. This course will enable students to expand their knowledge of effective nonprofit management practices and to increase their understanding of the complex environment in which nonprofits operate. Students will become better prepared to achieve social objectives as leaders in business, government or the social sector.
LEAD 4100 Leadership for the Common Good 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: BUSA 1105
This course aims to inspire, teach and engage students in the theory and practice of public leadership, citizenship and civic engagement in a democratic society - from the local to the national and global. Good public leaders - whether in or outside of government - in a democratic society display certain capacities and virtues, such as being able to articulate and effectively implement an ethical vision. Such leaders facilitate broad-based citizen participation in matters of governance. Good citizens choose and influence good leaders, are informed and able to reason critically about public matters, and are committed to advance the common good. They are able to deliberate with others, whose values they may not share, in order to solve common problems.
LEAD 4500 Special topics 1 3 credits
1 class hour
Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit.
Prerequisite: Permission of Department
Special topics courses represent subject matter not covered in other courses in the curriculum. These are generally presented in a classroom setting. This class may be repeated one time with different content.
LEAD 4510 Independent Study 1 3 credits
1 class hour
Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit.
Prerequisite: Permission of Department
This is a customized course, conducted independently, which allows the student to participate in study that represents research, reading, and/or projects that is under the direction of a faculty member of the School of Business and Public Management. (Student must have a minimum of 45 contact hours for the course.) This class may be repeated one time with different content.
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MATH 0987 Foundations for Quantitative Reasoning 4 credits
4 class hours
A study of the essential mathematical concepts required for success in Math 1001: Quantitative Skills and Reasoning. Topics may include numeracy, proportional reasoning, algebraic reasoning, modeling via functions, and skills for mathematical success. Institutional credit only.
Math 0989 Foundations for College Algebra 4 credits
4 class hours
The purpose of this course is to prepare students for entry into College Algebra (MATH 1111) for the
STEM pathway. This course provides detailed review of the fundamental concepts in mathematics including integers, decimals, fractions, exponents, percent, ratios, and proportions. Algebraic expressions, solutions to equations with applications will be covered. Polynomials, factoring, radical and fractional exponents will be discussed in great detail. Institutional credit only.
MATH 0997 Support for Quantitative Reasoning 1 credit
1 class hour
Prerequisite: Entry into MATH 0997 is either by choice or placement. Students must be concurrently enrolled in MATH 1001 Quantitative Skills and Reasoning.
This course provides an introduction to the Algebraic concepts and techniques necessary for MATH 1001. The topics covered include performing basic operations with rational and real numbers, simplifying expressions with exponents, using percentages, understanding graphs, solving linear equations, writing equations of a line, and recognizing functions and their graphs. Institutional credit only.
MATH 0999 Support for College Algebra 1 credit
1 class hour
Prerequisite: Entry into MATH 0999 is either by choice or placement. Students must be concurrently enrolled in MATH 1111 College Algebra.
This course provides an introduction to the Algebraic concepts and techniques necessary for MATH 1111. The topics covered include performing basic operations with rational and real numbers, simplifying expressions, solving linear equations, factoring polynomials, operating with rational and radical expressions and equations. Institutional credit only.
MATH 1001 Quantitative Skills and Reasoning 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: Two years of high school algebra, acceptable CPE or SAT score, or successful completion of MATH 0987. Learning support students are also required to take MATH 00997 as a co-requisite course.
This course is an alternative in Area A of the Core curriculum and is not intended to supply sufficient algebraic background for students who intend to take Precalculus or the calculus sequence for mathematics and science majors. This course places quantitative skills and reasoning in the context of experiences that students will be likely to encounter. It emphasizes processing information in context from a variety of representations, understanding of both the information and the processing, and understanding which conclusions can be reasonably determined. Students cannot receive credit for both MATH 1001 and MATH 1111.
MATH 1111 College Algebra 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: Two years of high school algebra, acceptable CPE or SAT Score, or successful completion of MATH 0989. Learning support students are also required to take MATH 0999 as a co-requisite course.
This course is a functional approach to algebra that incorporates the use of appropriate technology. Emphasis will be placed on the study of functions and their graphs, inequalities, and linear, quadratic, piece-wise defined, rational, polynomial, exponential, and logarithmic functions. Appropriate applications will be included.
Note: Students cannot receive credit for both MATH 1111 and MATH 1113.
MATH 1112 Trigonometry 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: MATH 1111 (with a grade of C or better) or Permission of Department
This course studies angles and their measure in detail. Trigonometric functions and their graphs, trigonometric identities, inverse trigonometric functions and their graphs. Applications of trigonometric functions, complex numbers and polar forms are also studied. Note: Students cannot receive credit for both MATH 1112 and MATH 1113.
MATH 1113 Precalculus 4 credits
4 class hours
Prerequisites: Acceptable CPE or SAT score or Permission of Department
This course is designed to prepare students for calculus, physics, and related technical subjects. Topics include an intensive study of algebraic and transcendental functions accompanied by analytic geometry. Note: Students cannot receive credit for both MATH 1112 and MATH 1113.
MATH 1120 Survey of Calculus 4 credits
4 class hours
Prerequisite: MATH 1111 or MATH 1113 (with a grade of C or better in at least one) or Permission of Department
Designed primarily for business administration and social science majors, this course includes a review of algebra skills for calculus, problem-solving and mathematical modeling, differential calculus, and integral calculus.
MATH 1121 Calculus I 4 credits
4 class hours
Prerequisite: MATH 1112 or MATH 1113 (with a grade of C or better in at least one) or Permission of Department
This course consists of fundamentals of analytic geometry and introductory calculus including functions and their graphs, limits, continuity, derivatives, differentiation of algebraic and transcendental functions. Derivatives, antiderivatives, differentials, Riemann sums, area between curves, numerical integration, and integration by substitution and applications will also be studied.
MATH 1122 Calculus II 4 credits
4 class hours
Prerequisite: MATH 1121 (with a grade of C or better) or Permission of Department
The course is a continuation of MATH 1121 and includes the definite integral with applications to differential equations, integration of transcendental functions; techniques of integration; solids of revolution; improper integrals; infinite sequences and series; Power series and Taylor polynomials.
MATH 1371 MATLAB Programming 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: MATH 1111 or MATH 1113 (with a grade of C or better in at least one)
This course is designed to help students develop programming skills through the MATLAB mathematical computing environment. This course is an introduction to design and construction of programs used for scientific applications that require data analysis or that involve images, sound, and other signals. No previous programming experience required.
MATH 2008 Foundations of Numbers and Operations 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: MATH 1001 or MATH 1111 or MATH 1113
This course is an Area F introductory mathematics course for early childhood education majors. This course will emphasize the understanding and use of the major concepts of numbers and operations. As a general theme, strategies of problem-solving will be discussed in the context of various topics.
MATH 2110 Logic 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: MATH 1111 or MATH 1113
The major emphasis of the course is deductive reasoning. It includes recognizing arguments, symbolizing and checking the validity of arguments, use of truth tables, modified truth tables, rules of inference, propositional and predicate logic, fallacies, categorical propositions, categorical syllogisms, symbolic logic, methods of deduction, and set theory. This course may not be used to satisfy degree requirements for students majoring in Mathematics nor for those majoring in secondary education.
MATH 2112 Probability and Statistics 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: MATH 1001 or MATH 1111 or MATH 1113
Topics covered include introduction to statistics (data, vocabulary, uses and abuses of statistics, sampling, and statistical computing), descriptive statistics (graphical techniques and numerical techniques), probability distributions (discrete and continuous distributions including the normal distribution), z scores and central limit theorem, estimation (point/interval), hypothesis testing (1 sample, 2 sample, ANOVA and correlation/regression). MINITAB, SPSS or Excel software may be used in laboratory.
MATH 2112H Honors Probability and Statistics 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: Permission of the Honors Program Director and Completion of MATH 1001, MATH 1111, or MATH 1113
Topics covered include introduction to statistics (data, vocabulary, uses and abuses of statistics, sampling, and statistical computing), descriptive statistics (graphical techniques and numerical techniques), probability distributions (discrete and continuous distributions including the normal distribution), z scores and central limit theorem, estimation (point/interval), hypothesis testing (1 sample, goodness of fit, contingency tables and ANOVA), and Bayes Theorem, Statdisk, MINITAB, SPSS or Excel software may be used in laboratory. This course covered the topics in MATH 2112 in more depth. Note: Students cannot receive credit for both MATH 2112 and MATH 2112H.
MATH 2123 Calculus III 4 credits
4 class hours
Prerequisite: MATH 1122 (with a grade of C or better)
This course studies functions of two or three variables and includes parametric equations and polar coordinates vectors in the plane and space, partial differentiation, double and triple integrals, line integrals, Green's Theorem, Stoke's Theorem, Divergence, Curl and applications.
MATH 2124 Linear Algebra 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: MATH 1122 (with a grade of C or better) or Permission of Department
An introduction to linear algebra including systems of linear equations, determinants, vector spaces, subspaces, bases and linear independence, orthogonality, linear transformations, eigenvalues, eigenvectors and applications.
MATH 2403 Differential Equations 4 credits
4 class hours
Prerequisite: MATH 1122 (with a grade of C or better)
This course presents the foundations and theory of ordinary differential equations. Topics include First-order differential equations (linear and nonlinear), linear second order and higher order differential equations, series solutions, systems of differential equations, matrix methods for linear systems, existence and uniqueness theorems, the Laplace transform, and applications.
MATH 3000 Logic and Proof 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: MATH 1122
This course is designed to help students develop skills in reading and understanding elementary mathematical proofs, and in expressing their own mathematical ideas through formal writing. Topics include logical connectives and quantifiers, types of proof, set theory, functions, integers, induction and equivalence relations.
MATH 3010 History of Mathematics 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: MATH 1122
This course is studies the historical development of mathematics from its origins to modern times. It examines the influence of different famous mathematicians and historical events on the continuous development of mathematics throughout history.
MATH 3110 Abstract Algebra I 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: MATH 2124, MATH 3000 (with a grade of C or better in each)
This course studies the definitions and basic properties of groups (with examples), homomorphisms, normal subgroups, quotient groups and direct products. Rings, integral domains, fields, Ideals, quotient rings and polynomials rings will also be studied.
MATH 3250 Discrete Mathematics 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: MATH 1121 (with a grade of C or better)
This course is a foundational course in Discrete Mathematics intended for students majoring in Mathematics. Topics include proposition and predicate logic, basic set theory, counting techniques, elementary number theory and cryptography, introduction to proofs, mathematical induction and recursion, advance counting techniques, relations, recursion, graph theory, trees, matrix algebra and Boolean algebra.
MATH 3360 Modern Geometry 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: MATH 1122 (with a grade of C or better)
This course studies Euclidean and non-Euclidean systems. An axiomatic approach is used and formal language and proofs in geometry are introduced.
MATH 3500 Independent Studies in Mathematics 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: Departmental approval
This course will provide the students the opportunity to further their knowledge in a particular subject in mathematics by working independently under the direction of the instructor. Reading, writing, or research in mathematics is expected. This course cannot be taken more than two times.
MATH 3510 Explorations in Geometry and Measurement 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: Completion of Area F mathematics or permission of the Dean
This is a mathematics course for Early Childhood Education and Middle Grades Education majors. This course will emphasize the understanding and use of fundamental concepts of geometry and methods and materials of instruction. Topics covered may include polygons, angles, geometry in space, constructions, measurement, transformations and tessellations. This course may not be used to satisfy degree requirements for students majoring in Mathematics nor for those majoring in secondary education.
MATH 3520 Algebra and Proportionality 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: Completion of Area F mathematics or permission of the Dean
This is a mathematics course for Early Childhood Education and Middle Grades Education majors. This course will emphasize the deep understanding and the use of the fundamental concepts of algebra, as well as the methods and materials of instruction. Students will gain a better perspective of how the topics and concepts they will eventually teach fit into the broader mathematical framework. Topics covered may include linear, quadratic, and exponential functions and their graphs; patterns, especially arithmetic and geometric sequences and the Binomial Theorem; solving equations; and ratios and proportions. This course may not be used to satisfy degree requirements for students majoring in Mathematics nor for those majoring in Secondary Education.
MATH 3522 Discrete Mathematics II 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: MATH 3251 (with a grade of C or better)
This course is a continuation of MATH 3251. Topics include advance counting techniques, relations, recursion, graph theory, trees, matrix algebra and Boolean algebra.
MATH 4011 Real Analysis I 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: MATH 3000, MATH 2124 (with a grade of C or better in each)
This course is designed for students of mathematics and studies the basic elements and theory of the real numbers. Topics include sequences, series, limits of functions, continuity, uniform continuity, metric spaces and differentiation.
MATH 4022 Real Analysis II 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: MATH 4011 (with a grade of C or better)
This course is a continuation of MATH 4011, Real Analysis I. It includes sequences and series of functions, the Riemann integral, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus and basic topology.
MATH 4060 Complex Variables 3 credits
3 class Hours
Prerequisites: MATH 1122, MATH 2124, MATH 3000 (with a grade of C or better in each)
This course studies the theory of functions of a complex variable. Complex numbers, analytic functions, Cauchy-Riemann equations, complex integration, Cauchy integral formula, Morera's theorem, Liouville's theorem, Contour integration and residue theory.
MATH 4110 Abstract Algebra II 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: MATH 3110 (with a grade of C or better)
Development of group theory through Cauchy's Theorem and the Sylow Theorems. Topics in Elementary ring theory, introduction to modules and vector spaces will be addressed. Linear algebra, linear transformations and matrices will also be studied.
MATH 4200 Undergraduate Seminar in Math 2 credits
2 class hours
Prerequisite: Departmental approval.
This course serves as the capstone course for all mathematics and mathematics education majors. Selected topics in pure mathematics or applied mathematics are discussed. Students will provide written, oral and group presentations and discussions on selected mathematical topics. Students will also learn mathematics Typesetting using available software like Lyx and Latex. Course can be taken no more than twice for up to 4 credits.
MATH 4260 Mathematical Modeling 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: MATH 2403 (with a grade of C or better)
This course introduces the student to the study and development of mathematical models to describe a wide range of phenomena form the natural and social sciences. Applications may include business, population growth, predator-prey, epidemics and a variety of physical phenomena; may also include student motivated projects and computer simulation of models.
MATH 4311 Probability and Statistics II 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: MATH 2112, MATH 1122 (with a grade of C or better in each)
Topics include discrete and continuous distributions and density functions, expected values, moment generating functions of probability distributions, multivariate distributions, transformation of random variables and regression analysis.
MATH 4360 Topology 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: MATH 2124, MATH 3000 (with a grade of C or better in each)
This course develops the important concepts of open and closed sets, topological spaces, bases, subspaces, continuous functions, homeomorphisms, connected spaces and compact spaces.
MATH 4400 Operations Research 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: MATH 2124 (with a grade of C or better)
This course examines linear, nonlinear and dynamic programming, deterministic and probabilistic operations research models. The study of the optimization methods will be both analytical and numerical. Appropriate software like Mathematica will be used.
MATH 4450 Number Theory 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: MATH 3000 (with a grade of C or better)
This course will provide an overview of the standard topics in number theory, including elementary properties of integers including divisibility, unique factorization, congruences, linear congruence equations, Chinese Remainder Theorem, Theorems of Wilson, Fermat, and Euler, Multiplicative functions, Quadratic Residues and the Law of Quadratic Reciprocity, Primitive Roots, and Diophantine Equations. Additional topics, such as RSA Cryptography and Continued Fractions, may be covered at the discretion of the instructor.
MATH 4510 Foundations of Statistics and Probability 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: Completion of Area F mathematics or permission of the Dean
This course focuses on recognizing, using, and learning about mathematics in the context of real-world situations and problems. This course provides special emphasis for teachers of grades P-8 on the fundamental concepts of probability and statistics with particular attention to specific methods and materials of instruction. This course is intended for teacher education majors only.
MATH 4610 Numerical Analysis 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: MATH 1122 (with a grade of C or better)
This is a course in analysis of algorithms with practical applications in mathematics and physical sciences. Topics include root approximation, interpolation, polynomial approximation, numerical differentiation and integration, iterative methods for solving linear and nonlinear systems of equations. Numerical explorations will be performed in any appropriate language.
MATH 4900 Topics in Mathematics 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: Departmental approval
This course will cover a wide range of topics of interest in advance mathematics in the area chosen by the instructor.
MGED 3000 Professional Seminar I 0 credit
0 class hours
Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education cohort
Corequisite: MGED 3090
Professional Seminars represent three-hour workshops held at the beginning of the semester and monthly throughout the semester. These workshops provide an overview of the semester, the courses to be completed, the connections between courses, the overall course outcomes, dispositional expectations, technology skill development relative to the courses, and connection with the conceptual framework as candidates develop their knowledge, skills, and dispositions. (No credit is awarded until the completion of MGED 4001.)
MGED 3001 Professional Seminar II 0 credit
0 class hours
Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education cohort
Corequisite: MGED 3091
Professional Seminars represent three-hour workshops held at the beginning of the semester and monthly throughout the semester. These workshops provide an overview of the semester, the courses to be completed, the connections between courses, the overall course outcomes, dispositional expectations, technology skill development relative to the courses, and connection with the conceptual framework as candidates develop their knowledge, skills, and dispositions. (No credit is awarded until the completion of MGED 4001.)
MGED 3010 Middle Grades Schools and Curriculum 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education cohort
This course introduces teacher candidates to middle school theory, the current context of middle level schools, major concepts and principles of middle school curriculum, middle school standards, and strategies for motivating middle school learners.
MGED 3020 Middle Grades Instruction and Assessment 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: MGED 3010, Admission to Teacher Education cohort
This course provides teacher candidates with best practice research on effective instructional techniques for middle grade learners, application and integration of technology, how to connect instruction to assessment, background regarding informal and formal assessment techniques and instruments appropriate for use in assessing middle grade students, and how to use and interpret data.
MGED 3030 Professional Roles, Ethics, and Collaboration in the Middle School 2 credits
2 class hours
Prerequisite: MGED 3010
This course addresses the professional roles, ethical expectations, and collaborative relationships expected of professional educators at the middle school level. Attention to pertinent school law and current cases are included.
MGED 3040 Language Issues in Today's Middle Schools 2 credits
2 class hours
Prerequisite: MGED 3010
This course examines language development as it relates to middle school students, critical issues for ESOL instruction, and attention to development of critical language skills appropriate for middle school-aged children and their parents.
MGED 3090 Middle Grades Practicum I 1 credit
1 class hour
Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education cohort
Corequisite: MGED 3000
This course provides teacher education candidates with directed field experiences in elementary and middle schools (Grades 4-8) with assignments and activities commensurate to their level and course work.
MGED 3091 Middle Grades Practicum II 1 credit
1 class hour
Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education cohort
Corequisite: MGED 3001
This course provides teacher education candidates with directed field experiences in elementary and middle schools (Grades 4-8) with assignments and activities commensurate to their level and course work.
MGED 4000 Professional Seminar III 0 credit
0 class hours
Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education cohort
Corequisite: MGED 4090
Professional Seminars represent three-hour workshops held at the beginning of the semester and monthly throughout the semester. These workshops provide an overview of the semester, the courses to be completed, the connections between courses, the overall course outcomes, dispositional expectations, technology skill development relative to the courses, and connection with the conceptual framework as candidates develop their knowledge, skills, and dispositions. (No credit is awarded until the completion of MGED 4001.)
MGED 4001 Professional Seminar IV 1 credit
0 class hours
Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education cohort,
Corequisite: MGED 4091
Professional Seminars represent three-hour workshops held at the beginning of the semester and monthly throughout the semester. These workshops provide an overview of the semester, the courses to be completed, the connections between courses, the overall course outcomes, dispositional expectations, technology skill development relative to the courses, and connection with the conceptual framework as candidates develop their knowledge, skills, and dispositions.
MGED 4010 Classroom Management in Middle Schools 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: MGED 3010, MGED 3020, MGED 3030
This course focuses on dealing effectively with middle grade student behavior and management of middle grades classrooms, dealing effectively with emerging adolescent behavior from a psychological basis, and learning to reflect on teacher actions and environmental conditions that often induce behavior that negates engaged learning and productive social interaction.
MGED 4028 Effective Instruction: Math (math concentration only) 2 credits
2 class hours
Prerequisites: MGED 3010, MGED 3020
The purpose of this course is to familiarize teacher candidates with effective methods for teaching mathematics to students in the middle grades. The emphasis is on teaching for mathematical understanding, reasoning, connections, applications, representations, and problem solving in a wide range of mathematical areas, including: numbers and computation; probability and statistics; geometry and measurement; and algebra. Topics include: current recommendations from national and state mathematic commissions and organizations, recent research in middle school mathematics learning and teaching strategies, utilization of teaching aids including the physical models and technology, differentiating activities and resources, developing curricula and evaluation tools at the unit level, serving traditionally underserved populations and other current issues in mathematics education.
MGED 4030 Effective Instruction: Science (science concentration only) 2 credits
2 class hours
Prerequisites: MGED 3010, MGED 3020
This course explores both the teacher's and the learners' role in middle/secondary science classrooms. Teacher candidates will learn how to create positive learning environments that foster inquiry and promote meaningful learning. Numerous aspects of the science classrooms will be discussed including but not limited to: alternative forms of assessing instruction, designing a 5E curriculum, planning inquiry and constructivist based lessons and units, determining and adapting appropriate teaching methods, promoting inquiry, fostering dialogue, meeting district and national science standards, using technology and kinesthetic activities to promote learning, student and teacher preconceptions on the nature of science and the appropriate use of the laboratory.
MGED 4032 Effective Instruction: Social Sciences (social science concentration only) 2 credits
2 class hours
Prerequisites: MGED?3010, MGED 3020
The purpose of this course is to examine the curricula, instructional strategies, and classroom organization for social studies education relevant to grades Four through Nine. Emphasis is placed on the implementation of effective instructional strategies across the social sciences in modern classroom settings.
MGED 4034 Effective Instruction: ELA (English/language arts concentration only) 2 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: MGED 3010
Principles of teaching applied to language arts in the secondary schools - Topics include: motivation, organizational of subject matter, lesson/unit planning, assessment and reporting, organization and management of the classroom, and methodology and materials of the secondary schools. Teacher candidates develop an understanding of state and national standards to design developmentally appropriate English/language arts programs to meet the varying abilities and learning styles of young adolescents. This course addresses the following topics: 1) Composing in a variety of modes for a particular audience and purpose, 2) Responding to text by employing personal experiences, 3) Evaluating the content, organization and language of text, and 4) Applying the conventions of Standard English in writing and speaking, 5) General overview of a reading program with emphasis on developmental content, comprehension, skills and strategies, whole language approach, and instructional processes as applied to classroom teaching.
MGED 4090 Middle Grades Practicum III 1 credit
1 class hour
Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education cohort
Corequisite: MGED 4000
This course provides teacher education candidates with directed field experiences in elementary and middle schools (Grades 4-8) with assignments and activities commensurate to their level and course work.
MGED 4091 Capstone Internship in the Middle Schools 6 credits
Teaching Hours in the Schools - TBD
Prerequisite: Completion of all professional education coursework
This course provides teacher candidates an opportunity for full-time classroom teaching experience under the direction of an experienced mentor teacher and a college faculty supervisor. Placements must be in the public school setting in grades 4-5 and 6-8.
MGED 4120 Professional Development Seminars 2 credits
2 class hours
Corequisites: MGED 4001, MGED 4091
Candidates are required to participate in a minimum of five Noon Seminars the three semesters prior to their final semester. Noon seminars are coordinated by faculty in collaboration with local public schools. Following the Noon Seminar, candidates complete an on-line module and assessment. Noon Seminar topics include, but are not limited to these areas: children & poverty, teacher as leader, improving followership, making sense of UBD and GPS, ESOL and ESL instructional issues, critical conversational Spanish for a middle school setting, content area reading strategies, and middle school curriculum.
MGMT 3100 Principles of Management 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: ACCT 2101, BUSA 1105, and either ECON 2105 or ECON 2106 with a grade of C or better
Management functions and processes as applied to organizations and to individuals in organizations. Topics to be covered include strategy, job and organization design, ethics and social responsibility, diversity, global influences, leadership, motivation, human resource management, and organizational change. Emerging managerial issues will be introduced.
MGMT 3110 Management of Organizations and Individuals 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: MGMT 3100 or PUBA 3000
Management functions and processes as applied to organizations and to individuals in organizations. Topics to be covered include strategy, job and organization design, ethics and social responsibility, diversity, global influences, leadership, motivation, human resource management, and organizational change. Emerging managerial issues will be introduced.
MGMT 3120 Human Resource Management 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: PUBA 3000 or MGMT 3100 or permission of instructor
This course introduces students to the fundamentals of strategic human resource management as applicable in nonprofits, private enterprises, and governmental organizations operating in the United States or based in the United States.
MGMT 3140 Fundamentals of Resort Management 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: HOSP 1106, HOSP2018 or MGMT 3100 and MKTG 3100
This course is designed to explore the management and planning of conferences, conventions, meetings, and special events. Issues relating to the responsibility of a planner are developed. Site selection, negotiations, program design, budgeting, contracts, marketing, and logistics are addressed.
MGMT 3300 Supply Chain Management 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: MGMT 3100 and MATH 2112 with a grade of C or better
This course examines the key concepts of supply chain management, involving the flows of materials and information among all of the entities that contribute value to a product or service, from raw material sources to end customers. The management of the relationship between a firm and its supply chain partners is emphasized: primarily the suppliers from whom it purchases its inputs and those who assist in the logistics and distribution of the products. The course has an international emphasis to reflect the trend of increasing partnerships with international suppliers, international transportation providers, and distributors in foreign markets.
MGMT 3320 Operations Management 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: MGMT 3100 and MATH 2112 with a grade of C or better
Examines the fundamentals and application of the principles of management to the planning, control, design, operation, and updating of operational systems both in the manufacturing and service sectors. Examines how organizations achieve quality, timing, cost and capacity objectives. Topics covered include TQM, continuous improvement, statistical process control, six sigma, MRP, JIT, and project management techniques like GANTT and PERT.
MGMT 3350 Business Logistics and Materials Management 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: MGMT 3100 with a grade of C or better
Concepts, strategies, and practices related to demand management, procurement and manufacturing, inventory, transportation infrastructure and operations, warehousing, packaging, material handling and distribution. Prerequisite: Principles of Operations and Supply Chain Management.
MGMT 3500 Business Law and Ethics 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: BUSA 1105
This course addresses the legal and ethical implications of an increasingly complex business world. Covers methods for analyzing and applying personal values, recognizing organizational, environmental, and legal forces that influence ethical behavior, and heightening the student's abilities to recognize legal and ethical issues and engage in effective moral debate in a business setting.
MGMT 3600 Hospitality Management 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: MGMT 3100
The student examines the issues and strategies of the hospitality industry. The concept of service and linkages to the functional areas of marketing, operations and human resources of hospitality businesses will be discussed. Different strategies for planning and implementing effective customer service will be covered including Six Sigma and utilizing Malcolm Baldridge Quality for Excellence criteria in a variety of hospitality settings including hotels, restaurants, foodservice operations, convention/meeting facilities, venues and clubs.
MGMT 4100 Entrepreneurship 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: FINC 3100, MGMT 3100, and MKTG 3100
This is a study of the business formation process. It focuses on characteristics of successful entrepreneurs, creativity, risk taking, and the necessary planning associated with new business ventures. Students will develop an idea for a new business venture, conduct a feasibility analysis, identify resources, and conclude with a comprehensive business plan.
MGMT 4200 Strategic Management (senior standing only) 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: MGMT 3100, MKT 3100, FINC 3100, MGMT 3320, and MGMT 3500
This is a capstone course designed to integrate knowledge gained in the various functional business areas and to exercise the student's analytical skills in problem identification, strategy formulation, integration, and decision implementation, including international and ethical considerations.
MGMT 4210 Strategic Golf Course Management 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: MGMT 3140
Golf courses are more than just sculptured areas of land and grass. They are unique assets that include design, real estate investments, lodging, beverage management, tournaments and resort development. This course applies business principles to this unique business asset.
MGMT 4300 Facilities Management 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: MGMT 3140 or MKTG 3100
Convention centers, sporting venues, shopping malls, and full services resorts are multi-faceted assets that require unique management skills. The course exposes students to the business principles as they apply to the unique arenas.
MGMT 4500 Special Topics 1 3 credits
Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit.
Prerequisite: Permission of Department
Special topics courses represent subject matter not covered in other courses in the curriculum. These are generally presented in a classroom setting. This class may be repeated one time with different content.
MGMT 4510 Independent Study 1 3 credits
1 class hour
Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit.
Prerequisite: Permission of Department
This is a customized course, conducted independently, which allows the student to participate in study that represents research, reading, and/or projects that is under the direction of a faculty member of the School of Business and Public Management. (Student must have a minimum of 45 contact hours for the course.) This class may be repeated one time with different content.
MGMT 4750 Management of Innovation and Technology 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: MGMT 3100
This course aims to equip students with the knowledge to understand, and the skill to participate in the management of technological innovation at the operational and strategic levels. The course addresses the planning, development, and implementation of technological capabilities to shape and accomplish the strategic and operational objectives of a business organization. Topics of study include disruptive technology, dimensions, life cycle, and diffusion of technology. Technological forecasting and environmental monitoring, role of technology in strategic management, managing change, assessment, justification, and financing new technology, and management of NTBF (new technology-based firms).
MKTG 3100 Principles of Marketing 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: BUSA 1105, ACCT 2101 and either ECON 2105 or ECON 2106 with a C grade or better
This is an introduction to the basic principles of marketing and the marketing environment with a focus on development of an understanding of ethical planning, implementing, and controlling marketing activities on a local, national, and international scale.
MKTG 3110 Integrated Promotion 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: MKTG 3100
This course examines all marketing communication tools, including advertising, public relations, sales promotion, and personal selling, and how these tools should be coordinated into an integrated promotion program to effectively communicate with consumers.
MKTG 3130 Event Management 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: HOSP 1106 and HOSP 2108 or MKTG 3100
This course is designed to explore the management and planning of conferences, conventions, meetings, and special events. Issues relating to the responsibility of a planner are developed. Site selection, negotiations, program design, budgeting, contracts, marketing, and logistics are addressed.
MKTG 4100 Marketing Research and Consumer Behavior 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: MKTG 3100 and MATH 2112
This is a study of the consumer decision-making process and the factors influencing it. Psychological, sociological, economic, and cultural anthropological factors are examined. Their impact on marketing formulation, both domestic and international, is emphasized. This course will review market research methods of gathering primary and secondary consumer behavior information.
MKTG 4175 Global Marketing 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: MKTG 3100 and MKTG 3110
This course applies marketing principles to develop and implement successful marketing solutions to complex global marketing opportunities and problems. Political, legal, economic, and cultural considerations inherent in international markets are applied to marketing strategic decisions.
MKTG 4198 Marketing Strategy 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: MKTG 3100, MKTG 3110, MKTG 4100 and senior standing
This is an integrative course which serves as the capstone to the marketing concentration. The course emphasizes developing and implementing strategic principles to marketing planning. The environment is analyzed to determine threats and opportunities. Based upon consumer research and analysis, marketing, strategies are formulated to effectively manage products, services, pricing, distribution, and integrated promotion decisions.
MKTG 4500 Special topics 1 3 credits
1 class hour
Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit.
Prerequisite: Permission of Department
Special topics courses represent subject matter not covered in other courses in the curriculum. These are generally presented in a classroom setting. This class may be repeated one time with different content.
MKTG 4510 Independent Study 1 3 credits
1 class hour
Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit.
Prerequisite: Permission of Department
This is a customized course, conducted independently, which allows the student to participate in study that represents research, reading, and/or projects that is under the direction of a faculty member of the School of Business and Public Management. (Student must have a minimum of 45 contact hours for the course.) This class may be repeated one time with different content.
MUSI 1100 Music Appreciation 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: None
An introduction to the appreciation of music which relates the development of music to general history and cultural history from the Middle Ages to the present and develops students' ability to listen perceptively. Extensive critical listening to representative works forms a major portion of the course content.
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NURS 1111 Nursing 1 8 credits
5 class hours, 9 laboratory hours
Prerequisite: Admission to the nursing program
Prerequisites and/or Corequisites: BIOL 2111
Course Description: This course introduces students to knowledge and skills basic to beginning nursing practice. Based on the program philosophy and organizing framework, students begin to provide care to clients using a safe, systematic, caring, holistic approach. Students begin the socialization process into the nursing profession by practicing interpersonal skills with faculty, clients, colleagues and health-care providers. Students will begin to apply critical thinking, ethical, legal, teaching/learning, and pharmacological concepts. These concepts are integrated into classroom and clinical learning activities. The student is introduced to the basic human needs of clients, throughout the life span, with special clinical emphasis on the geriatric client. The student learns to include developmental factors in health assessment and health promotion. The student learns to identify age-related stressors which impact alterations in heath. The student learns essential assessment, communication and technical skills in order to provide care to clients with commonly occurring alterations in biopsychosocial health care needs. The student begins basic practice in the role of provider in acute-care and community-based settings. This is an eight credit hour course, placed in the first semester of the first year of the nursing sequence. Students will have five hours of class and an average of nine hours of laboratory or clinical experiences each week.
NURS 1112 Nursing 2 8 credits
5 class hours, 9 laboratory hours
Prerequisite: NURS 1111
Prerequisites and/or Corequisites: PSYC 2103
Course Description: This course is designed to focus on the biopsychosocial needs of the child and adult client. Utilizing a safe, systematic, caring, holistic approach, students will provide care for adults and children experiencing physical or mental problems which interfere with the individual's ability to meet human needs. Emphasis is placed on the care and health promotion of clients with commonly occurring physical or mental problems in acute care and community-based settings. Students will practice the nursing roles of teacher, advocate, and team member. The role of provider is emphasized in prevention of illness and maintenance or restoration of physical and mental health. Classroom, clinical, and laboratory activities sensitize students to personal reactions, myths, and social stigma related to physical and mental health issues. Students practice critical thinking skills in these settings and practice therapeutic communication with clients and professional communications with faculty, colleagues, and health-care providers. This is an eight credit hour course in the second semester of the first year of the nursing sequence. Students will have 5 hours of class and an average of 9 hours of laboratory or clinical experiences per week.
NURS 2111 Nursing 3 9 credits
4 Class Hours, 15 laboratory hours
Prerequisite: NURS 1112
Prerequisites and/or Corequisites: BIOL 2215
Course Description: This course integrates concepts from the child-bearing family and adult and child health. Content will focus on the biopsychosocial needs of clients throughout the life span. Utilizing a safe, systematic, caring, holistic approach, students will provide care for the healthy and at-risk adult, child, and child-bearing woman experiencing physical problems which interfere with the individual's ability to meet human needs. Building on previous concepts, students will learn to care for multiple clients with complex health problems in acute-care and community-based settings. Students will assess physical, psychosocial, and developmental needs of the family while fostering family unity. Students will plan and implement care for clients with needs related to family planning, parenting, and congenital alterations in the newborn. The roles of provider, teacher, manager, and advocate are emphasized as well as the essential competencies identified in the program philosophy. Students will utilize critical thinking skills in classroom learning activities, laboratory and in acute- and community-based clinical settings. This is a nine credit course in the first semester of the second year of the nursing program. Students will have 4 hours of class and an average of 15 hours of laboratory or clinical experiences per week.
NURS 2112 Nursing 4 12 credits
6 class hours, 18 laboratory hours
Prerequisites: NURS 2111 and all core must be completed
Course Description: This course emphasizes provision of care for adults and children who are unable to meet human needs secondary to multi-system health problems. Utilizing a safe, systematic, caring, holistic approach, students will provide nursing care to clients experiencing physiological crisis. Clinical and college lab activities focus on development and practice of critical care nursing skills within a variety of settings. Students will practice the nursing roles of provider, advocate, teacher, and team member. The role of manager is emphasized. The clinical preceptorship supports transition into professional practice. Students will utilize critical thinking when analyzing data, evaluating outcomes, solving problems, and making decisions in classroom and clinical settings. The course encourages students to explore professional questions, issues, and trends that impact health care, and serves to transition the student from the academic to the professional setting through evaluation of health care system responses to trends, as well as legal, bio-ethical, economic, and professional issues. This is a twelve-credit course in the second semester of the second year of the nursing program. Students will have 6 hours of class and an average of 18 hours of laboratory or clinical experiences per week.
NURS 3100 Theoretical Foundations of Professional Nursing 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: Core Courses and Acceptance into Nursing
Corequisites: NURS 3102, NURS 3104, NURS 3106 or permission of instructor
This course provides the foundation for the theory and practice of professional nursing. Professional standards, the code of ethics and legal issues are discussed as it relates to the nurse's role in the health care setting. An emphasis is placed on the ability of the nurse to think critically and examine issues in nursing. The role of the nurse in the health care systems is discussed with an emphasis on role socialization and implementation of nursing practice.
NURS 3101 Theoretical Perspectives in Nursing Transition 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: Core Area A-F Requirements and admission into RN-BSN program, Current Georgia RN License
This web based course, Theoretical Perspectives in Nursing Transitions, is designed to allow a practicing RN to examine the structures of nursing practice. The course will review nursing theory, issues, evidence based practices, complementary or alternative approaches, current health promotions and communicating through a web based learning platform.
NURS 3102 Health Assessment and Promotion 4 credits
3 class hours, 3 laboratory hours
Prerequisites: Area A-F Requirements and Acceptance into Nursing Program
Corequisites: NURS 3100, NURS 3104, NURS 3106 or permission of instructor
Course Description: This course focuses on health history and physical examination skills, as well as health promotion, restoration, and maintenance activities related to caring for diverse clients. Emphasis is on the cognitive, affective and psychomotor skills necessary to perform a complete head-to-toe physical examination. It also includes clinical variations, developmental tasks, and health promotion, restoration, and maintenance activities related to the infant, child, and older adult, as well as significant cultural variations. Application of clinical assessment and clinical judgment is assessed in the laboratory setting.
NURS 3104 Pathophysiologic Concepts of Nursing Practice 4 credits
4 class hours
Prerequisites: BIO 2110, BIOL 2111, BIO 2115;
Corequisites: NURS 3100, NURS 3102, NURS 3106, or permission of instructor.
This course is designed to introduce the student to pathophysiologic concepts related to altered biological processes affecting individuals across the lifespan. It provides an overview of the pathophysiology of selected conditions focusing on the etiology, pathogenesis, physiological changes, and clinical manifestations of health problems. Focus will be on the application of the basic concepts to body systems, disease processes and nursing practice. Pathophysiology builds on previous principles from anatomy, physiology, and chemistry. Emphasis is upon the physiological changes that contribute to disease processes, the body's compensation for these changes and the application of this knowledge.
NURS 3106 Fundamentals of Nursing 4 credits
3 class hours, 3 clinical/laboratory hours
Prerequisites: Completion of Core Courses (Area A-F)
Co-requisites: NURS 3100, NURS 3102, NURS 3104 or permission of instructor.
This course provides the foundation for clinical practice, recognizing the individual needs of adult patients and the importance of continuity of care. Nursing process is the framework utilized to meet the patient's health care needs. Cultural and ethnic factors impacting health care beliefs and practices will be explored. The clinical care will focus on basic skills, health assessment and professional communication.
NURS 3107 Pathophysiologic Applications to Nursing Practice 4 credits
4 class hours
Prerequisites: Current Licensure as a Georgia Registered Nurse, BIOL 2110, BIOL 2111, BIOL 2115 AND/OR admission to the BSN program or permission of the instructor.
Pathophysiologic concepts are explored using a body systems approach. Theories relating etiology, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, and pharmacology are used to study common disease processes as they relate to current clinical nursing practice. Concepts from anatomy and physiology, microbiology and pathophysiology provide a foundation for exploring human dysfunction.
NURS 3205 Gerontology and Healthy Aging 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: NURS 3100, NURS 3102, NURS 3104, NURS 3106 or permission of instructor
Corequisites: NURS 3207, NURS 3208, NURS 3209 or permission of instructor.
This course will focus on health, wellness, and aging reflecting the most current information on evidence-based gerontological nursing. Theories of aging related to physiological, psychological, spiritual, developmental, and sociocultural changes experienced in an aging population will be examined. The impact of the economics and delivery of health care and health policies are examined from a national and global perspective.
NURS 3207 Pharmacological Nursing Concepts 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: NURS 3100, NURS 3102, NURS 3104, NURS 3106 or permission of instructor
Corequisites: NURS 3205, NURS 3208, NURS 3209 or permission of instructor
This course is focused on a systematic approach to nursing responsibilities related to administration of broad classifications of drugs. The integration of pharmacokinetics and patient care are applied to clinical settings. There will be a systematic review of drug classes and their relationship to the disease process. Medication administration and calculation is an integral part of this course.
NURS 3208 Mental Health Nursing 5 credits
3 class hours, 6 clinical/laboratory hours
Prerequisites: NURS 3100, NURS 3102, NURS 3104, NURS 3106
Corequisites: NURS 3205, NURS 3207, NURS 3209 or permission of instructor.
This course focuses on psychosocial aspects of care applied to adults, children, family and aging. Promotion of mental health and the impacts of mental disorders on adults, children, family, and the community are presented. Particular focus is on the therapeutic communication and nursing's role in fostering mental health with individuals and in the community by involvement in service learning. Nursing care for persons with mental and substance abuse disorders is studied and practiced in community mental health settings.
NURS 3209 Medical-Surgical Nursing I 5 credits
3 class hours, 6 clinical/laboratory hours
Prerequisites: NURS 3100, NURS 3102, NURS 3104, NURS 3106
Corequisite: NURS 3205, NURS 3207, NURS 3208 or permission of instructor.
This course addresses concepts related to physiological and psychological changes experienced by the adult with an alteration in health. Advancing from the knowledge developed in prior courses, such as pathophysiology, health assessment & fundamental nursing guides the increased use of critical thinking and application of nursing process. Clinical care of the adult client in the hospital setting focuses on secondary care and tertiary care. Skills advance toward medication administration, holistic approach to planning care, and projection of long-term care needs with initial consideration of prioritization of care. Concepts forming the basis for nursing care of these clients include chronic disorders of oxygen, fluid alternations, metabolic changes and neurological disorders.
NURS 4104 Medical-Surgical Nursing II 6 credits
3 class hours, 9 clinical/laboratory hours
Prerequisites: NURS 3207, NURS 3209, NURS 3205, NURS 3208
Corequisites: NURS 4105, NURS 4106 or permission of instructor.
This course addresses concepts related to physiological and psychological changes experienced by the adult with an alteration in health. Advancing from the knowledge developed in prior courses, such as pharmacology & medical-surgical nursing I enhances critical thinking and application of nursing process. Clinical care of the adult client in the hospital setting focuses on all levels of care with an emphasis on acute medical situations. Skills advance toward complex medication administration, prioritization of multiple patient care, and projections of staffing and patient needs with consideration of acuity levels of care.
NURS 4105 Nursing Care of Women and Infants 4 credits
2 class hours; 6 lab/clinical hours
Prerequisite: NURS 3105, NURS 3107, NURS 3208, NURS 3209
Corequisite: NURS 4105, NURS 4106 or permission of instructor.
This course focuses on the provision of nursing care to women across the lifespan and the childbearing family. Women's health focuses on the physical and psychosocial needs of women throughout their life. A developmental framework for understanding the life cycle, physiological and psychological changes provides the foundation for care giving. An emphasis is on the normal reproductive phases of the life cycle, including prenatal, childbirth, postpartum and newborn care. The concepts of communication, pharmacology, nutrition and education are integrated throughout the course. Students will utilize the nursing process when planning care for women and childbearing families who may vary in age, ethnicity, and cultural backgrounds. Clinical experiences focus on care of women and childbearing families in a variety of settings.
NURS 4106 Nursing Care of Children 4 credits
2 class hours; 6 clinical/laboratory hours
Prerequisites: NURS 3205, NURS 3207, NURS 3208, NURS 3209
Corequisites: NURS 4104, NURS 4105 or permission of instructor.
This course is designed to focus on children as unique individuals with different capacities and vulnerabilities according to developmental level and health status. Children's responses in health and illness situations are examined within the context of their environment with an emphasis on the family. Nursing interventions that promote, maintain, or restore health and optimal functioning are explored in relation to children and their families. Clinical experiences focus on nursing care of children and families in health care and community settings.
NURS 4204 Research and Evidenced Based Nursing Practice 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: NURS 4104, NURS 4105, NURS 4106
Corequisites: NURS 4205, NURS 4206, NURS 4107 or permission of instructor.
This course presents an overview of basic nursing research concepts and examines the steps in the research process. The student will acquire the basic skills and knowledge needed to become a consumer of nursing research. Emphasis is on the review and critique of published research and the utilization of research findings in evidence-based nursing practice.
NURS 4205 Community Focused Nursing 4 credits
2 class hours; 6 clinical/laboratory hours
Prerequisites: NURS 4104, NURS 4105, NURS 4106
Corequisites: NURS 4204, NURS 4206, NURS 4107 or permission of instructor.
Concepts of community oriented nursing and community based nursing will be explored. Public health policy from local to international levels along with surveillance, epidemiological methods, community assessment and techniques used to restore and maintain the health care of diverse populations and strategies for promoting wellness are included. Clinical experiences will expose students to a variety of community health environments, health programs and policies and their impact on care.
NURS 4206 Nursing Leadership and Management 2 credits
2 class hours
Prerequisites: NURS 4104, NURS 4105, NURS 4106
Corequisites: NURS 4204, NURS 4205, NURS 4207 or permission of instructor.
Selected principles of leadership and management as they relate to health care delivery and to specific nursing service roles in which nurses function. Includes content on leadership roles, management theories, components of effective management, organization dynamics, political and economic context of health care and career development strategies.
NURS 4207 Transitional Nursing Practicum 6 credits
2 seminar hours; 12 clinical hours
Prerequisites: NURS 4104, NURS 4105, NURS 4106
Prerequisites or Corequisites: NURS 4204, NURS 4205, NURS 4206 or permission of instructor.
Transitional nursing practicum is the capstone experience for the nursing student. As a final course of their nursing education, the intent of this experience is to apply the accumulation of their nursing knowledge in the clinical setting using leadership, professionalism, and skillful nursing knowledge to provide care for the patient. With the assistance of experienced, professional nurses as a preceptor, the student nurse will practice prioritization, delegation, and management skills as they prepare for their transition from student to practicing baccalaureate nurse.
NURS 4208 Capstone Experience in Professional Nursing 4 credits
2 project hours; 6 clinical hours
Prerequisites: All nursing courses
Prerequisites or Corequisites: NURS 4206 Nursing Leadership & Management
The Capstone Experience in Professional Nursing is the final experience for the nursing student transitioning from an associate degree to a baccalaureate degree. It is the intent of this experience to apply the accumulation of their nursing knowledge clinically in a student-selected setting. The student will be expected to complete a project for the agency/facility where the clinical occurs. This is a hybrid course using the web based learning platform and clinical experience.
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PHED 1110 Weight Training 2 credits
1 class hour, 2 laboratory hours
The student will be introduced to the principles of weight training in order to be able to develop muscular strength and/or endurance in all of the major muscle groups of the body. Fitness concepts and functions of muscles will be covered as well as the mechanics of performance for exercises which work the muscle groups. Students will participate in a prescribed program for the first half of the semester. The second half of the semester the student will participate in a personalized program designed by the student to work all of the major muscle groups.
PHED 1120 Aerobic Conditioning 2 credits
1 class hour, 2 laboratory hours
The student will participate in aerobic dance, step aerobics and other forms of aerobic conditioning exercise in order to improve the cardiorespiratory system (aerobic capacity). The class will also include muscular conditioning exercises to exercise muscle groups which are used only minimally during the aerobic workout, such as the abdominal muscles. All major muscle groups and their functions will be covered and the student will understand and be able to demonstrate which exercises work which muscle groups.
PHED 1140 Fitness Walking and Jogging 2 credits
1 class hour, 2 laboratory hours
The student will participate in an exercise program designed to improve cardiorespiratory endurance (aerobic capacity). Basic fitness concepts and other related health and fitness material will be covered in the classroom. The student will be introduced to the basic principles and mechanics for participation in fitness walking and jogging and will participate in each form of exercise for a prescribed amount of time and then choose (under the guidance of the instructor) which form of exercise in which to participate for the remainder of the semester.
PHED 1150 Body Conditioning 2 credits
1 class hour, 2 laboratory hours
The student will learn the fundamental principles underlying physical activity and how to put these principles into practice by participating in an organized, total body, fitness program. Each student will design a personal fitness program to meet his/her individual needs. Other health and related fitness concepts will also be covered.
PHED 1160 Interval Aerobics 2 credits
1 class hour, 2 laboratory hours
Students will be introduced to the principles of interval aerobics. Intervals alternate brief periods of high-intensity recovery work with low intensity recovery periods, involving both the aerobic and anaerobic systems. This course utilizes single body station weight machines and aerobic activity stations in alternating succession as well as activities including cycle, gliding, circuit training, and trekking (treadmill intervals). This class is for everyone, at any age, at every level of fitness. Students will strive to improve their level of fitness and performance. There will be an additional fee for this course, payable when tuition is paid. This additional fee will be paid to a local gym for the cost of their facility usage and equipment.
PHED 1210 Golf 1 credit
2 laboratory hours
The student will be introduced to the basics of golf including the grip, stance, swing, putting, chipping, terminology, scoring and etiquette. Students will progress to being able to play a round of golf. The course will be conducted at the Coastal Pines Golf Center and a fee will be charged. Golf balls and clubs will be provided or students may use their own clubs.
PHED 1221 Bowling 1 credit
2 laboratory hours
The fundamentals of bowling (grip, stance, approach, release, scoring, and etiquette) will be covered and students will practice these skills in order to attain sufficient skill with which to participate in bowling as a recreational activity. Students will use these skills in game situations throughout the semester and participate in a class bowling tournament during the last two weeks of the semester. The class will be held at the Strike Zone and there will be a fee required to be paid to the Strike Zone which will include all games, shoes and ball use.
PHED 1231 Volleyball 1 credit
2 laboratory hours
The student will be introduced to the fundamentals of volleyball including different serves, set, dig, spike, terminology, rules, scoring and court etiquette. The class will emphasize skill development through the use of drills designed to develop skill and the use of skills in game situations. Sufficient skill will be developed in order that the student will be able to participate successfully in volleyball as a recreational activity. Students will primarily participate in the six-person team volleyball but will also be introduced to two and three-person team play.
PHED 1242 Badminton 1 credit
2 laboratory hours
The fundamentals of badminton (grip, serve, clears, drop, smash, rules, scoring and etiquette) will be covered. Students will practice the skills of badminton through drills and game situations in order to attain sufficient skill with which to participate in badminton as a recreational activity.
PHED 1250 Tennis 1 credit
2 laboratory hours
The student will be introduced to the basic skills of tennis (grip, stance, serve, forehand, backhand, volley, half volley, lob, and overhead) as well as rules, scoring, strategy and etiquette of the game. Students will practice skills during various drills and will use the skills in game situations of singles and doubles.
PHED 1430 Outdoor Challenges 1 credit
0.5 class hour, 1 laboratory hour
Students will participate in various challenges, cooperative games, and other forms of adventure programming in an outdoor setting, which will include both low and high Ropes Course elements. This course develops leadership skills, stimulates group interaction and team building, and improves self-reliance and problem solving skills. The class will meet a total of four (4) days and 100% attendance is required. It will meet one Friday at a Brunswick CCGA classroom, and then the student will meet the following weekend at Epworth's Ropes Course on St. Simons Island. There will be an additional fee for this course, payable when tuition is paid. This additional fee will be paid to Epworth by the Sea's Ropes Course for usage of their facility and equipment.
PHED 1440 Camping and Hiking 1 credit
2 laboratory hours
Students will learn fundamental elements of recreational camping and hiking. The first class will be one afternoon, on the CCGA Brunswick campus to cover basic materials needed for camping and hiking, selected camping skills and planning for the overnight camping trip. The remainder of the class will be conducted at a public campground within four hours or less driving time from campus. At the campground more concepts will be covered and participated in. On the second day of the campout, camping skills will be tested and a written test will also be given. There will be an additional fee for this course payable when tuition is paid. This additional fee will be used to cover the cost of meals and campsite fees.
PHED 1450 Snow Skiing/Boarding I 2 credits
1 class hour, 2 laboratory hours
Students will develop basic skills of snow skiing or snowboarding as well as concepts related to safety, conditioning, etiquette, clothing, equipment, etc. The course will include two (2) (MANDATORY) orientation sessions on the Brunswick campus prior to the trip to a specified ski facility for the remainder of the class sessions. There will be an additional fee for this course, payable when tuition is paid. The additional fee will cover textbook, group lessons, equipment, lift tickets and lodging.
PHED 1455 Snow Skiing/Boarding II 2 credits
1 class hour, 2 laboratory hours
Prerequisite: PHED 1450
Students will develop an intermediate level of Snow Skiing and Snow Boarding skills. Those students already skilled in the basics of snow skiing/boarding will be allowed to further their skill and increase their level of expertise. The course will include two (2) MANDATORY orientation sessions on the Brunswick campus prior to the trip and to a specified ski facility for the remainder of the class sessions. There will be an additional fee for the course, payable when tuition is paid. This additional fee will cover textbook, group lessons, equipment, lift tickets and lodging.
PHED 1460 Martial Arts 2 credits
1 class hour, 2 laboratory hours
Students will participate in Shotokan Karate. The three components of karate practice will be covered: 1) kihon (blocks, punches, kicks and stances), 2) kata (pre-arranged movements simulating combat situations) and 3) sparring kumite with an opponent. Training will concentrate on both the physical and mental aspects of martial arts practice. Skill and written tests will be given at the end of the semester. Students will be required to purchase a uniform (gi) for this course during the first week of the semester.
PHED 1610 Dance-Social/Country-Western/ Line 2 credits
1 class hour, 2 laboratory hours
The Social/Line Dance class provides a fun and dynamic learning environment for anyone to come express themselves through various kinds of partner and line dancing. There will be a blend of the disciplines of dance, as well as, a brief glimpse into the history of dance. Students will learn how to dance in a social environment in order to participate in dance as a recreational activity. They will be introduced to basic line dances and will learn to use and sequence basic steps into various dance situations, and learn the process of linking the steps together to form the dance. Students will become proficient in basic social dance styles including, but not limited to, Waltz, Fox-Trot, Cha-Cha and others.
PHED 1620 Dance-Latin Rhythms 2 credits
1 class hour, 2 laboratory hours
The Dance-Latin Rhythms class provides a fun and dynamic learning environment for anyone to come express themselves through various kinds of Latin rhythm dancing. Compared to typical ballroom dances, Latin dances are generally faster-paced, and more rhythmic in expression. Dance music may be Latin American music or contemporary popular music. There will be a blend of the disciplines of dance as well as a brief glimpse into the history of dance. Students will learn how to dance in a social environment in order to participate in dance as a recreational activity. Students will become proficient in basic social dance styles including, but not limited to, Salsa, Rumba, Merengue, Cha Cha, and Cumbia. In addition to these popular dance styles, students will also experience Zumba, a popular fitness program inspired by Latin dance. The word Zumba comes from a Colombian word that means to move fast and have fun. Using upbeat Latin music together with cardiovascular exercise, Zumba is aerobic dancing that is lots of fun and easy to learn.
PHED 1710 Individual Physical Education I 1 credit
2 laboratory hours
Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
This course is designed for the student who cannot fulfill the physical education graduation requirements in any other physical education class because of a physical or medical disability. An individual program is designed to fit the students' needs and to give maximum flexibility and benefits. An emphasis is placed on being a physically educated person.
PHED 1720 Individual Physical Education II 1 credit
2 laboratory hours
Prerequisite: Successful completion of PHED 1710 and Permission of Instructor
This course is the second session designed for the student who cannot fulfill the physical education graduation requirements in any other physical education class because of a physical or medical disability. The student will research his/her physical disability and will continue to implement an individual fitness program to meet his/her needs. The student will also receive information on sound nutrition and how to implement a food diary designed to track and enhance their food choices. Emphasis will be placed on wellness so that the student can continue to enhance their fitness knowledge.
PHED 1721 Intercollegiate Athletics I 1 credit
2 laboratory hours
Full-time students who are participating in their first year of the College of Coastal Georgia intercollegiate program may register for this course and receive one hour of physical education credit.
PHED 1722 Intercollegiate Athletics II 1 credit
2 laboratory hours
Full-time students who are participating in their second year of the College of Coastal Georgia intercollegiate program may register for PHED 1722 and receive one hour of physical education credit.
PHED 1800 Introduction to Yoga 2 credits
1 class hour, 2 laboratory hours
This is an activity course that provides an introduction to the general history, basic training principals, and various styles and forms of Yoga. The class focuses on safely stretching your muscles by increasing the range of motion around the joints. Basic poses, called asanas, will be performed and tested. Breathing techniques will be explored with the purpose of decreasing the student's tension, and thereby improving relaxation. The goal of the course is to provide health benefits such as increased flexibility, strength, and balance.
PHED 2011 Health and Physical Education Practicum I 1 credit
0.5 class hour, 1 laboratory hour
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor
Any student majoring in Health and Physical Education must enroll in PHED 2011 as part of the Area F requirement for additional field experience in health and physical education. Students will participate and assist in public school based physical education classes, college physical education classes, or health and fitness centers or medically based health and fitness programs.
PHED 2012 Recreation Practicum 1 credit
0.5 class hour, 1 laboratory hour
Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor
This course is based on field experience for students majoring in recreation. Students will participate and assist in a public recreation program through the city, county, Boys and Girls Club, YWCA, or other public agencies.
PHED 3310 Physical Activity and Health in the Early Childhood Curriculum 2 credits
2 class hours
Prerequisites: ECED 3310, SPED 3110
This course is designed to assist Early Childhood/Special Education teacher candidates to integrate effectively physical education and health knowledge and skills in the classroom.
PHIL 2010 Introduction to Philosophy 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: None
This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of philosophy, its meaning and functions, its vocabulary and problems. It offers students an opportunity to become more aware of themselves and the world around them.
PHIL 2020 Critical Thinking and Reasoning 3 credits
3 Class hours
Prerequisites: None
This course offers an introduction to the principles of reasoning which includes both formal and informal logics. Under the rubric of informal logic students will learn to recognize arguments in ordinary language; they will also be introduced to common informal fallacies and methods for avoiding them. In formal Logic students will be introduced to methods of deduction in propositional and predicate logics. The course may also include an introduction to inductive arguments.
PHIL 2030 Introduction to Ethics 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: None
This course is an introduction to the principles and problems of ethics in relation to a variety of contemporary issues. The course will engage students in critical thinking about the major philosophical positions concerning right and wrong, moral values, and moral responsibility.
PHIL 3600 Special Topics in Philosophy 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: PHIL 2010 with a grade of C or better or permission of the instructor
This study of a selected topic in philosophy may examine aspects of classical or traditional philosophy in detail, such as the history of women in philosophy, non-western philosophies, or topics of current (or discipline-specific) interest, such as issues in contemporary ethics, e.g., the rights of marginalized groups, issues of business or scientific ethics, or other topics of interest.
PHIL 4080 American Philosophy 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: Phil: 2010
The most important philosophical works and ideas that form the basis for the American Intellectual experience are examined. Study will include the works of Jefferson, Franklin, Pierce, James, Dewey and King.
PHIL 4115 The American Paradigm 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: Phil 2010
This course focuses on the works of Plato and Aristotle as they form the paradigms for Western thought, particularly the influence on the American Experience.
PHIL 4220 Environmental Ethics 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: PHIL 2030
This course covers major topics in environmental ethics from the 1970's to the present ranging from questions of animal rights and welfare to ecofeminism and deep ecology.
PHSC 3000 Principles of Physical Science 3 credits
2 class hours, 2 laboratory hours
Prerequisite: Completion of Area A mathematics requirement and both Area D science requirements with a grade of C or better.
PHYS 1011 or 1111 and CHEM 1100, 1151 or 1211 are strongly recommended.
This course reinforces the basic concepts of the fundamental behavior of matter and energy. It provides greater depth on topics such as motion, heat, sound, electricity, light, periodic properties, chemical and nuclear reactions, solutions and organic chemistry. The laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material.
PHYS 1011 Survey of Physics 5 credits
4 class hours, 2 laboratory hours
Prerequisite: MATH 1111 with a grade of C or better
This course covers some basic concepts and applications of physics. Topics to be covered include mechanics, heat, electricity, light, and sound. Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material. Note: this course could also be used by Associate of Science or Associate of Art non-science majors (only) to partially satisfy their Area D science requirements. This course cannot be substituted for PHYS 1111, PHYS 1112, PHYS 2211, or PHYS 2212.
PHYS 1111 Introductory Physics I 4 credits
3 class hours, 2 laboratory hours
Prerequisites: MATH 1111 and MATH 1112 or MATH 1113 with a grade of C or better
An introductory course which will include mechanics (kinematics, dynamics, work and energy, momentum and collisions, and rotational motion and statics), and may also include thermodynamics and waves. Elementary algebra and trigonometry will be used. Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material. (Note: A student may not receive credit for both PHYS 1111 & PHYS 2211)
PHYS 1112 Introductory Physics II 4 credits
3 class hours, 2 laboratory hours
Prerequisite: PHYS 1111 with a grade of C or better
An introductory course which will include material from electromagnetism, optics, and modern physics. Elementary algebra and trigonometry will be used.
PHYS 2211 Principles of Physics I 4 credits
3 class hours, 3 laboratory hours
Prerequisite: MATH 1121 with a grade of C or better
An introductory course which will include mechanics (kinematics, dynamics, work and energy, momentum and collisions, and rotational motion and statics), and may also include thermodynamics and waves. Elementary calculus will be used.
PHYS 2212 Principles of Physics II 4 credits
3 class hours, 3 laboratory hours
Prerequisites: PHYS 2211 and MATH 1122 with a grade of C or better
An introductory course which will include material from electromagnetism, optics, and modern physics. Elementary differential and integral calculus will be used.
PLAD 2000 Prior Learning Assessment 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: None
Techniques for the development of documentation for prior learning experiences based on standards and criteria established by academic and subject matter professionals. Students prepare and submit documentation, which provides a clear description of competencies and learning obtained.
POLS 1101 American Government 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: None
An introductory course in American government covering the organization, functions, and processes of federal, state, and local governments, with emphasis on the federal. This course satisfies the Georgia requirement for proficiency in studies of the United States and Georgia Constitutions.
POLS 2302 Introduction to International Relations 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: POLS 1101
Introduction to International Relations examines the interaction of nation-states in the world system. The course will focus on three areas: the conduct of International Relations, issues in International Relations, and theoretical approaches to International Relations.
POLS 1101H Honors American Government 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: Permission of the Honors Program Director
An introductory course in American government covering the organization, functions, and processes of federal, state, and local governments, with emphasis on the federal. This course satisfies the Georgia requirement for proficiency in studies of the United States and Georgia Constitutions. Honors courses offer more robust coverage of the same content areas delivered through the traditional course format.
POLS 3201 Constitutional Law and the Federal System 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: POLS 1101
Study of the U.S. Supreme Court opinions on the Constitution. Emphasis on powers of the national government, judicial review, federalism, commerce power, separation of powers, power to tax and spend.
POLS 3202 Constitutional Civil Liberties 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: POLS 1101
Study of the U.S. Supreme Court opinions on the Constitution. Emphasis on individual rights, nationalization, the Bill of Rights, substantive and procedural due process, freedom of expression, association, religion, privacy and equal protection.
POLS 4415 Civil Liberties 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: POLS 1101
An intensive study of the rights of Americans as guaranteed by the Constitution. The changing character of civil liberties problems in the United States will be stressed with attention given to the legal, historical and political context of the cases studied.
POLS 4427 American Political Thought 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: POLS 1101
This course explores the diverse spectrum of American political thinking from the prerevolutionary period to the present. Beginning with colonial discourse, this comprehensive review captures the depth and distinctiveness of American thought as expressed by and through the writings and actions of philosophers, politicians, radicals, and revolutionaries.
PSYC 1101 Introduction to Psychology 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: None
This course is an introduction to the basic concepts and theories related to contemporary psychology. It introduces the application of the scientific method in the study of human behavior and examines how biological, psychological and social factors affect behavior. Major units of study include history, research methods, biological bases of behavior, learning, motivation, personality, stress, consciousness, and psychopathology.
PSYC 2103 Introduction to Human Development 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: PSYC 1101
This course is an introduction to the dynamics of human development across the life span. Emphasis is placed on physical, cognitive, social, and emotional development, and their respective theories and applications.
PSYC 2104 Introduction to Abnormal Psychology 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: PSYC 1101
This course is an introduction to maladaptive behaviors and psychological disorders as classified by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (current edition). Students will be introduced to historical and clinical perspectives, symptoms, etiology, and treatment through the application of psychological theory and research findings. Biological, psychosocial, and socio-cultural influences will be examined.
PSYC 2105 Introduction to Psychology of Adjustment 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: PSYC 1101
An examination of applied psychological theory and research as related to self-exploration, enhancement of mental health and well-being, and prevention of behavioral and mental disorders. Topics will include values development, conflict resolution, lifestyle management, anxiety and stress.
PSYC 3000 Research Methods and Statistics 4 credits
3 class hours, 2 laboratory hours
Prerequisites: PSYC 1101 and MATH 2112, with a grade of C or better
The course is designed as an introduction to behavioral science methods and statistics used in psychological research. The course and laboratory introduce the principles and methodologies involved in conducting, analyzing, and evaluating psychological research. This course and laboratory will emphasize describing and collecting data, descriptive statistics, inferential statistics, and writing APA-style research reports and presenting findings.
PSYC 3010 Adolescent Psychology 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: PSYC 2103 or EDUC 2130
This course is an introduction to behavior and development from early adolescence to adulthood, which will focus on the empirical study of biological, psychological, cognitive, emotional, personality, and social development that occur during adolescence. Topics addressed include: physical development, sexual maturation, social cognitions, identity development, peer relationships, family, socio-cultural context, adjustment and links between adolescent development and educational practice.
PSYC 3020 Infant and Child Psychology 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: PSYC 2103
This focus of this course is on theories and research concerning the psychology of infant and child development. Textbook and journal articles as well as online resources will be presented, researched, and discussed. Students will encounter materials to increase critical thinking on topics such as cross-cultural parenting and the role of new media in student's lives along with the learning of innovative presentation styles.
PSYC 3050 Psychology of Adults and Aging 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: PSYC 2103
A study of physical, emotional, cognitive, behavioral, and psychosocial changes occurring from young adulthood to old age. Focus is placed on topics such as preventive health measures, relationships, work and retirement, and death and dying issues.
PSYC 3200 Foundations of Brain and Behavior 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: PSYC 2103
This course is designed to provide a foundation for understanding the biological bases of behavior and mental processes in human and non-human animals. Emphasis will be on the ontology, phylogeny, and function of the physiology of behavior, affect, and cognition.
PSYC 3210 Psychology of Human Sexuality 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: PSYC 2103
This course is a survey of the psychology of human sexuality. Its focus is research based and topics include sex determination, reproduction, sexual orientation, sexual behavior over the lifespan, variations in sexual behavior, and related interpersonal and social issues.
PSYC 3220 Psychology of Drugs and Behavior 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: PSYC 2103
This course addresses the social, biological, and psychological factors relating to the major drugs associated with therapeutic and recreational use and abuse. Topics include drug use as a social problem, theories and treatment of addiction, how drugs work, and the detrimental health effects of drug use.
PSYC 3230 Psychology and Nutrition 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: PSYC 2103
In this course students study the relationship between nutrition, eating habits and the mental health issues of both children and adults. The course will explore whole foods nutrition, the treatment of eating disorders and therapeutic strategies for psychological disorders, such as food hoarding, bulimia, and non-nutritive eating. The course offers a broad base of knowledge in clinical health psychology with a mind-body focus.
PSYC 3240 Introduction to Health Psychology 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: PSYC 1101
This course will introduce students to contributions of psychological theories and empirical research in health psychology to the understanding, prevention, and treatment of a variety of health concerns. Topics include factors underlying health habits and lifestyles, methods to enhance health behavior and prevent illness, and stress and stress management. Emphasis will be placed upon the biopsychosocial model, which focuses on the interaction of social, emotional, behavioral, biological, and spiritual factors that influence health. The specific topics include stress, pain management, patient-physician relations, and chronic illnesses such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and AIDS.
PSYC 3260 Comparative Psychology 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: PSYC 2103
Area D BIOL, CHEM, or Human Biology are strongly recommended
Comparative Psychology is an interdisciplinary area within psychology that uses evolutionary principles as a unifying theme to scientifically investigate the proximate and ultimate influences on behavior and mental processes in human and non-human animals.
PSYC 3300 Community Psychology 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: PSYC 2103
Community psychology blends elements of many fields such as sociology, anthropology, clinical psychology, social psychology, developmental psychology, and urban studies. Students will discuss current research and intervention efforts consistent with the values of community psychology, highlighting issues of gender, race/ethnicity, and class.
PSYC 3310 Social Psychology 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: PSYC 1101
This course examines how people's thoughts, feelings, and behaviors are shaped by the social environment. Topics include interpersonal attraction, affiliation, aggression, prejudice, conformity, attitudes, persuasion, social cognition, altruism, self-presentation, social perception, and group behavior. Experimental research findings are emphasized.
PSYC 3320 Industrial/Organizational Psychology 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: PSYC 1101
Industrial/Organizational (I/O) Psychology is the application of the scientific study of human behavior and thinking to work organizations. I/O Psychology is both an academic discipline and a professional discipline; thus, in this class we focus on both research and the application of research findings to practical problems in the workplace. I/O Psychologists are concerned with the recruitment, selection, training, motivation, and job performance of individuals at work. They are also involved in issues such as teamwork, leadership, and job attitudes. This class provides a general overview of research and practical application in I/O Psychology.
PSYC 3330 Cross-Cultural Psychology 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: PSYC 2103
This course covers similarities and differences among the peoples of the world regarding psychological principles, concepts, and issues. Cross-cultural methodology and limitations are introduced. Socio-cultural variation in social behavior, personality, psychopathology, child development, emotion and cognition will be examined.
PSYC 3350 Sport Psychology 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: PSYC 1101
In Sport Psychology the emphasis is upon breaking down negative links between cognition, behavior and emotion in one's sport. We will examine psychoanalytic, humanistic, cognitive and behavioral approaches. In this course a range of sports will be explored, such as tennis, golf, and bowling through the use of case studies. We will examine how change is facilitated; the research behind the practice of sport psychology, and how psychological well-being is achieved and ultimately performance can be improved.
PSYC 3500 Introduction to Human Services 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: PSYC 1101
An analysis of the social needs addressed by human service agencies and an overview of the historical back- ground, development, purposes, career patterns, ethics, and organization of such agencies with emphasis on the not-for profit sector.
PSYC 3510 Human Services in Multicultural Context 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: PSYC 3500
Human service workers have had to become more aware and responsive to global as well as local multicultural issues that have emerged in the 21st century. Here students will explore of how cultural diversity influences the structure and delivery of human services both locally and globally. Services provided by nonprofit/NGO organizations as well as those provided by governmental agencies and the United Nations are reviewed along with course materials instructing students on the meanings of how growing globalization effects the human services sector.
PSYC 3600 Survey of Counseling and Clinical Psychology 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: PSYC 2104 or PSYC 2105
This course is designed to address the major concepts, theories, practices, and ethical issues in contemporary counseling and clinical psychology. An introduction to assessment, testing and the diagnostic process is included.
PSYC 3620 Psychopathology 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: PSYC 2104
This course provides an overview of the causes, development, assessment, prevention, and treatment of psychopathology. Basic research methods are covered with a high degree of student engagement to study psychopathology, theories of psychopathology, and practice with the skills of diagnosis and classification. This course is especially relevant for students who are pursuing clinically oriented service-learning such as mental health clinics, drug and alcohol prevention programs and early childhood intervention sites.
PSYC 3630 Theories of Personality 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: PSYC 2103
This course surveys classic and current theories of personality that represent several of the major perspectives in psychology (e.g., psychoanalytic, biological, developmental, behavioral, humanistic, cognitive, sociocultural), highlighting the contributions of each theory to personality description, assessment, research, therapy, and application.
PSYC 4000 Ethics & Professional Issues in Psychology 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: PSYC 3000 with a grade of C or better
Consideration of ethical and legal issues related to the professional application of psychology. The course will apply ethical and legal reasoning to major issues related to sound and professional practice in human services.
PSYC 4100 Experimental Psychology 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: PSYC 3000 with a grade of C or better
This course is an experimental course in which the skills obtained in research methods (PSYV 3000) are applied. The course further develops the student’s understanding of the principles and methodologies of research by conducting a complete psychological research project. Students will gain hands-on experience with computer-based and traditional research techniques along with computer-based statistical analysis.
PSYC 4200 Learning and Behavior 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: PSYC 3000 with a grade of C or better
This course offers an introduction to the various learning mechanisms that influence the establishment, maintenance, and/or reduction of behaviors in both humans and nonhuman animals. The course focuses on linking processes and theories of classical and operant conditioning to everyday behaviors.
PSYC 4220 Cognitive Psychology 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: PSYC 3000 with a grade of C or better
This course is an examination of the major theories and research findings in areas of human cognition such as information processing, memory, language, knowledge and problem-solving.
PSYC 4300 Supervised Research in Psychology 1 3 credits
Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in PSYC 3000 (Research Methods and Statistics) and permission of the instructor.
This course provides students with the opportunity to engage in empirical psychological research (laboratory or field) conducted under the supervision of a psychology faculty member. Credit for this course is variable and the student may earn from 1 to 3 hours credit depending upon the complexity of the project. No more than six credits can be applied to the Bachelor of Science in Psychology degree.
PSYC 4500 Organization and Administration of Human Service Agencies 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: PSYC 3500
This upper level course will cover a range of topics related to the role and function of a human service agency management professional. Topics include skills and techniques in areas of planning, staffing, budgeting, volunteer coordination, and risk management. Students will also learn skills related to community relations and how to interact with both advisory and governing boards.
PSYC 4510 Program Development and Grant Writing 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: PSYC 3000 with a grade of C or better
Program development requires a structured, organized, systematic process with a collaborative team. This course offers students an intensive course that teaches students the techniques to design, implement, and develop programs. Strategies designed to sustain successful programs will be examined along with the information needed to write a various types of grant proposals.
PSYC 4600 Special Topics in Psychology 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: Completion of 12 hours of upper division level psychology (3000-4000) with a grade of C or better and permission of the instructor.
This course is an upper level study of a selected topic with the field of psychology that is not currently taught as a required or elective course, but which will address program outcomes. Students may receive credit for no more than two sections of this elective course.
PSYC 4610 Theories of Motivation 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: PSYC 2103
This course focuses on the basic concepts and major theories of human motivation and emotion. The course examines the needs, cognition, and social aspects of motivation. Included is a critical review of research and application of these theories to human behavior, and the application of the principles of motivation in settings such as schools, work, personal development and counseling.
PSYC 4700 Psychology of Women 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: PSYC 1101
This course will be devoted to a critical examination of the study of women and gender in the field of psychology. Biological, social, and cultural aspects of the study of women and gender will be explored from various theoretical and empirical perspectives. Topics include theoretical perspectives of gender stereotypes, women's social relationships and sexuality, discrimination in the work place, portrayal of women in the media and violence against women.
PSYC 4710 Environmental Psychology 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: PSYC 1101
This course will introduce students to contemporary theories and empirical research in environmental psychology, which is the study of the interrelationships between humans and their natural and built environments. Topics include major theories about human-environment interactions, natural and human-made disasters, the influence of environmental stressors (e.g., noise, weather, pollution, crowding) on individuals and larger social groups, as well as human behavior, planning and design. We will also discuss biological and social factors influencing our relationship with nature and issues related to environmental action and preservation.
PSYC 4800 History and Systems of Psychology 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: PSYC 3000 with a grade of C or better, and completion of a minimum of 36 additional credits of upper level Psychology program courses.
The course is designed to investigate psychology's roots in the disciplines of philosophy and physiology, and perspectives in contemporary psychology that originated in both philosophy and physiology. The course will also examine cross-cultural epistemological and ontological perspectives. This course will include completion of the ETS Psychology Majors Test for the purpose of program assessment.
PUBA 3000 Principles of Public Management 3 credits
3 class hours
The course introduces the student to the history and current position of public management in U.S. It covers topics such as management, human resources and financial administration in the public sector, along with the theories of organization and institutions important to the function, structure, and operation of public organizations.
PUBA 3020 Comparative Public Management 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: PUBA 3000
This course introduces the student to a global perspective of public management in modern times and includes developing an understanding of the geographical, political, cultural, and religious factors that have influenced the development of public management in other parts of the world.
PUBA 3040 Administrative Law 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: PUBA 3000
A review of safeguards in the administrative system for the rights and liberties of those in direct contact with public administrators, and for the rights and liberties of public administrators. Topics of study include rule making, adjudication, administrative discretion, regulation, and the Administrative Procedures Act.
PUBA 3060 Public Budgeting and Finance 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: PUBA 3000
The course introduces students to the theory and practice related to managing financial capital in the public sector. Topics include budgeting practices, raising capital through debt instruments, revenue policies that impact taxes, fees, fines, and other sources of financial capital that facilitate government performing their services. The course will introduce accounting and reporting practices in the public arena. Comparisons will be made with the nonprofit and commercial business sectors.
PUBA 3100 Decision Tools for Public Management 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: PUBA 3000 and MATH 2112
A survey of the research techniques and issues common to the social sciences. Topics include experiment design, survey design, observational techniques, quantitative analysis, and research ethics.
PUBA 3130 Conflict Management 3 credits
3 class hours
Pre-requisite: PUBA 3000
This course provides an examination of the nature of conflict and joint decision-making processes in the public and non-profit sectors and provides students with the theory and tools for negotiation and conflict resolution.
PUBA 3140 Conflict Management 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: PUBA 3000
This course provides an examination of the nature of conflict and joint decision making processes in the public and non-profit sectors and provides students with the theory and tools for negotiation and conflict resolution.
PUBA 3150 Policy Development, Implementation and Analysis 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: PUBA 3000 and PUBA 3100
The course introduces the student to the theory and tools used to develop public policy options, their implementation, and their evaluation. The student is introduced to the various frameworks through which policy is often viewed so that they are better able to understand the origins of different policy and program alternatives.
PUBA 3170 Public Communication 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: PUBA 3000
Introduces students to the basic forms, audiences, and practices of communication in public, institutional settings. Students learn about the interrelationships among communicative activities and organizational goals. Internal and external messages, small group communication, interpersonal communication, and basic report preparation are covered. The course incorporates a focus on the influence of technological innovation on organization life and communicative practice. It provides students with opportunities to present work in written, oral, and computer-mediated forms.
PUBA 4200 Managing State and Local Governments 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: PUBA 3000
This course concentrates the student's learning experience on the knowledge, skills, and abilities necessary to successfully managing within state and local government. This course introduces management issues involving municipalities, counties, special purpose entities, and state agencies, and the challenges of intergovernmental cooperation. It includes the influence of federal policy on state and local government administration.
PUBA 4210 Planning and Evaluation 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: PUBA 3000
This course provides an examination of the processes of planning and evaluation in the public and nonprofit sectors. Students will develop an understanding of the relationship of planning to evaluation as applied to public sector decision-making.
PUBA 4200 Resource Development and Marketing for Nonprofits 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: PUBA 3000
This course is a survey of resource strategies and marketing for nonprofit organizations. Resources are defined broadly to include effective use of resources and development of resources, as well as marketing and fund-raising. Practical exercise and experiences will enhance learning.
PUBA 4230 Grant Writing 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: None
An examination of the process of acquiring and managing grants in the public sector. Emphasis is on demonstrating knowledge of grant strategies and procedures gained through course material and completion of a case study.
PUBA 4250 Emergency Management 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: PUBA 3000
An introduction to emergency management including the study of such topics as the evolution of emergency management in the United States, managing natural hazards and disasters, and managing man-made hazards and disasters.
PUBA 4260 Administrative Ethics in Public Service 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: PUBA 3000
This course helps students by broadening their understanding of the definition and philosophy of ethics. Students will learn to recognize ethical problems and gain skills to approach them with honesty, sincerity, and confidence. Special emphasis is given to public service ethics for public administrators.
PUBA 4500 Special topics 1 3 credits
1 class hour
Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit.
Prerequisite: Permission of Department
Special topics courses represent subject matter not covered in other courses in the curriculum. These are generally presented in a classroom setting. This class may be repeated one time with different content.
PUBA 4510 Independent Study 1 3 credits
1 class hour
Repeatable for maximum 6 hours credit.
Prerequisite: Permission of Department
This is a customized course, conducted independently, which allows the student to participate in study that represents research, reading, and/or projects that is under the direction of a faculty member of the School of Business and Public Management. (Student must have a minimum of 45 contact hours for the course.) This class may be repeated one time with different content.
PUBA 4910 Senior Seminar in Public Management 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: Senior Standing
Taken during the student’s final year in the Public Management major, this course provides a look at Public Management in the context of the larger society, as students explore the field of study through an internship, accompanied by record-keeping and analysis of their experiences through directed journaling. As a capstone project, students draw on their practical experiences and coursework to develop a personal philosophy of public management. The internship is supervised by both intern host and a faculty member.
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RADT 1001 Patient Care & Ethics 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Radiologic Science Program
Course Description:
This course is primarily concentrated on patient care and professionalism in the field of Radiologic Science. Emphasis is placed on communication skills, infection control, patient assessment, preparation for diagnostic imaging examinations, acute situations, and bedside radiography. Topics will be presented within the context of medico legal issues, medical terminology, basic pharmacology, record keeping, basic radiation protection, interpersonal relationships, and methods of patient care. This is a required course for the Radiologic Science cohort.
RADT 1002 Radiographic Procedures I 4 credits
3 class hours, 2 laboratory hours
Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Radiologic Science Program
Course Description:
A study of radiographic positioning procedures covering general anatomy and radiographic positioning terminology, the upper and lower extremities, thoracic cavity, abdomen, and biliary system. Concepts include radiographic anatomy, positioning, and image analysis. Radiographic protection is stressed. This is a required course for the Radiologic Science cohort.
RADT 1003 Radiographic Procedures II 4 credits
3 class hours, 2 laboratory hours
Prerequisites: RADT 1001, RADT 1002, RADT 1007
Course Description:
A study of radiographic positioning procedures covering the pelvic girdle, upper femora, shoulder girdle, bony thorax, gastrointestinal system, and genitourinary system. This is a required course for the Radiologic Science cohort.
RADT 1004 Film-Screen Image Acquisition 3 credits
2 class hours, 2 laboratory hours
Prerequisites: RADT 1001, RADT 1002, RADT 1007
Course Description:
A course designed to build a basic understanding of the theory and practical application of radiographic techniques. The course provides the learner with concepts related to radiographic film, processing, intensifying screens, quality factors, and exposure conversion techniques. This is a required course for the Radiologic Science cohort.
RADT 1005 Radiobiology/Radiation Safety 2 credits
4.5 class hours
Prerequisite: RADT 1001, RADT 1002, RADT 1007
Course Description:
A lecture course designed to provide a basic understanding of the manner in which radiation interacts with the biological system. Emphasis is given to concepts that increase one's awareness of the responsibility to protect the patient, public, and self from unnecessary radiation exposure. This is a required course for the Radiologic Science cohort.
RADT 1006 Radiographic Procedures III 4 credits
3 class hours, 2 laboratory hours
Prerequisites: RADT 1003, RADT 1004, RADT 1005, RADT 1112
Course Description: A study of radiographic positioning and procedures for the vertebral column, cranium, and additional studies. Concepts include radiographic anatomy, positioning, and image analysis. Radiation protection is stressed as each component of the course is covered. This is a required course for the Radiologic Science cohort.
RADT 1007 Introduction and Ethics in Radiologic Sciences 2 credits
2 class hours
Prerequisites: Acceptance into the Radiologic Science Program
Course Description: Content is designed to provide an overview of the foundations in radiography and the practitioner's role in the health care delivery system. Principles of diagnostic imaging and its modalities will be determined. The practices and policies of radiologic science and health care organization(s) are examined and discussed in addition to the professional responsibilities of the radiographer. Content is designed to provide a fundamental background in the professional role of a radiologic technologist. This is a required course for the Radiologic Science cohort.
RADT 1009 Digital Image Acquisition 2 credits
2 class hours
Prerequisites: RADT 1003, RADT 1004, RADT 1005, RADT 1112
Course Description: Content is designed to impart an understanding of the components, principles and operation of digital imaging systems found in diagnostic radiology. Factors that impact image acquisition, display, archiving and retrieval are discussed. Guidelines for selecting exposure factors and evaluating images within a digital system assist students to bridge between film-based and digital imaging systems. This is a required course for the Radiologic Science cohort.
RADT 1112 Introduction to Clinical Procedures and Techniques 3 credits
33 laboratory hours
Prerequisite: RADT 1001, RADT 1002, RADT 1007
Course Description: The student is introduced to work experience in clinical sites with supervision by the college Radiologic Science clinical instructor and designated members of the staff of the facility. Students will observe the clinical radiology environment and begin performing basic procedures which involve radiography of the chest, upper and lower extremities, and abdominal cavity under direct supervision as well as observe digital image processing and PACS utilization. This is a required course for the Radiologic Science cohort.
RADT 1113 Clinical Procedures and Techniques I 3 credits
33 laboratory hours
Prerequisites: RADT 1003, RADT 1004, RADT 1005, RADT 1112
Course Description: A continuation of RADT 1112, the student observes and performs radiographic procedures and techniques previously learned. Additionally, the student will begin performing radiography of the spinal column and cranium under direct supervision. An introduction/observation to surgical radiographic procedures will also be completed. An in-depth study of the components of a radiographic panel/room is included. This is a required course for the Radiologic Science cohort.
RADT 2001 Radiologic Science 4 credits
4 class hours
Prerequisites: RADT 2004, RADT 2005, RADT 2221
Course Description: Introduces the concepts of basic physics and emphasizes the fundamentals of x-ray generating equipment. Topics include units of measurement, atomic structure, structure of matter, electrostatics, magnetism and electromagnetism, electrodynamics, control of high voltage, rectification, x-ray circuitry, radiographic equipment, image intensified fluoroscopy, recording media and techniques, and computer literacy. This is a required course for the Radiologic Science cohort.
RADT 2002 Pathophysiology 2 credits
2 class hours
Prerequisite: RADT 2004, RADT 2005, RADT 2221
Course Description: This course will provide the student with an introduction to the concept of disease. Pathology and disease, as it relates to various radiographic procedures, will be discussed. Special procedures to demonstrate pathology will also be a focus of this course. This is a required course for the Radiologic Science cohort.
RADT 2003 Certification Fundamentals 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: All other didactic Radiologic Science courses
Course Description: A final, comprehensive course that provides connection and review of the concepts previously covered in the curriculum. It provides the student with a meaningful approach to evaluate previous learning and to investigate areas of needed preparation for employment and credentialing. The course also includes employment interview skills and related concepts such as resume preparation. This is a required course for the Radiologic Science cohort.
RADT 2004 Introduction to Computed Tomography 1 credit
1 class hour
Prerequisites: RADT 1003, RADT 1004, RADT 1005, RADT 1112
Course Description:
Content is designed to impart an understanding of the components, principles, and operation of computed tomography (CT) imaging systems found in diagnostic radiology. Factors that impact image acquisition, display, archiving and retrieval are discussed. Guidelines for performing basic chest, abdomen, head, neck, and pelvis CT examinations will be covered. Methods to reduce patient exposure to ionizing radiation will be discussed. This is a required course for the Radiologic Science cohort.
RADT 2005 Radiographic Pharmacology and Venipuncture 1 credit
1 class hour
Prerequisites: RADT 1003, RADT 1004, RADT 1005, RADT 1112
Content provides the basic concepts of pharmacology, venipuncture and administration of diagnostic contrast agents and intravenous medications. The appropriate delivery of patient care during these procedures is emphasized. This is a required course for the Radiologic Science cohort.
RADT 2006 Quality Assurance in Radiography 1 credit
1 class hour
Prerequisites: RADT 1003, RADT 1004, RADT 1005, RADT 1112
Content provides the basic concepts of quality assurance and maintenance issues in digital and radiographic imaging systems. This course will also address modality exploration. This is a required course for the Radiologic Science cohort.
RADT 2221 Clinical Procedures and Techniques II 2 credits
22 laboratory hours
Prerequisites: RADT 1006, RADT 2004, RADT 2005, RADT 1113
Course Description: This course involves the assignment of students to clinical sites for training and performance of procedures previously learned. In addition, radiographic surgical procedures and tomography will be incorporated in the unit. This is a required course for the Radiologic Science cohort.
RADT 2231 Clinical Procedures and Techniques III 3 credits
33 laboratory hours
Prerequisites: RADT 1009, RADT 2221
Course Description: A continuation of RADT 2221, the student continues to work in all areas and perform previously learned procedures. Major and minor special procedures will be incorporated. This is a required course for the Radiologic Science cohort.
RADT 2241 Advanced Clinical Procedures and Techniques 3 credits
33 laboratory hours
Prerequisites: RADT 2001, RADT 2002, RADT 2006, RADT 2231
Course Description: Continuation of clinical training and performance of procedures from previous clinical courses. An in-depth study of Quality Control/Quality Assurance practices for the general radiology department will be included as well as a processing/image analysis unit. Spot evaluations, written and practicum, will also be performed periodically throughout the course to prepare students for the National Registry upon program completion. This is a required course for the Radiologic Science cohort.
RDNG 3410 Teaching Reading in Grades K-2 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: SPED 3110 and Admission to Teacher Education cohort
This course provides teacher candidates an opportunity to learn and practice developmentally appropriate reading instructional strategies with an emphasis on phonemic awareness, phonics, and fluency as well as appropriate uses of visual literacy to enhance instruction.
RDNG 3420 Teaching Reading 3-5 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: RDNG 3410 and Admission to Teacher Education cohort
This course provides teacher candidates an opportunity to learn and practice developmentally appropriate reading programs with an emphasis on fluency, vocabulary study, and comprehension including appropriate uses of visual literacy to enhance instruction.
RDNG 4020 Reading, Writing and Literature in the Middle Schools 2 credits
2 class hours
Prerequisites: MGED 3010 and Admission to Teacher Education cohort
This course introduces teacher candidates to reading to learn, writing to learn, writing across the curriculum, and an introduction to adolescent literature appropriate for middle school instruction and learning as well as opportunities for integration of appropriate technologies across these areas.
RDNG 4021 Reading and Writing Issues in the Secondary School 2 credits
2 class hours
Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program (co-listed with RDNG 4020)
This course introduces teacher candidates to reading to learn, writing to learn, writing across the curriculum, and issues associated with reading and writing in the secondary school. This course includes a field experience in the schools.
RDNG 4410 Writing, Language Arts, and Children's Literature 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: RDNG 3410, RDNG 3420, Admission to Teacher Education cohort
Emergence of reading/writing processes in the P-5 years and the methods of teaching language arts and integrating children's literature in the curriculum as well as aspects of visual literacy that positively impact instruction.
RDNG 4420 Prescriptive Literacy Instruction 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: RDNG 4020 (GED majors)
Corequisite: ECSP 4191 (ECSP majors), MGED 4091 (MGED majors)
This course provides teacher candidates an opportunity to collect and analyze student data and then prescribe the principles underlying assessment and correction of learning difficulties related to reading during the completion of their capstone professional internship.
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SCED 3000 Secondary Curriculum, Instruction and Assessment 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher Education Program
This course provides teacher candidates with best practice research on effective instructional techniques for secondary school learners, application and integration of technology, how to connect instruction to assessment, background regarding informal and formal assessment techniques and instruments appropriate for use in assessing secondary students, how to use and interpret data, and the principles of secondary school curriculum as they relate to state and national standards.
SCED 3020 Methods of Teaching Secondary Science 2 credits
2 class hours
Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program (co-listed with MGED 4030)
This course explores both the teacher's and the learners' role in secondary science classrooms. Teacher candidates will learn how to create positive learning environments that foster inquiry and promote meaningful learning. Numerous aspects of the science classrooms will be discussed including but not limited to: alternative forms of assessing instruction, designing a 5E curriculum, planning inquiry and constructivist based lessons and units, determining and adapting appropriate teaching methods, promoting inquiry, fostering dialogue, meeting district and national science standards, using technology and kinesthetic activities to promote learning, student and teacher preconceptions on the nature of science and the appropriate use of the laboratory.
SCED 3022 Mathematics Method in Secondary Education 2 credits
2 class hours
Prerequisites: Admission to the Teacher Education Program.
The purpose of this course is to familiarize secondary education teacher candidates with effective methods of instruction for teaching mathematics to secondary education students. The emphasis is on teaching techniques and in the understanding, reasoning, connections, applications, representations and problem solving. A wide variety of problem solving techniques will be studied in different areas in mathematics including Precalculus, trigonometry, calculus, linear algebra and finite mathematics.
SCED 4010 Classroom Management in the Secondary School 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program (co-listed with MGED 4010)
This course focuses on dealing effectively with secondary students' behavior and management of secondary classrooms, dealing effectively with adolescent behaviors from a psychological basis, and learning to reflect on teacher actions and environmental conditions that often induce behavior that negates engaged learning and productive social interaction. This course includes a field experience in the schools.
SCED 4030 Professional Roles, Ethics, and Collaboration in the Secondary School 2 credits
2 class hours
Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program (co-listed with MGED 3030)
This course addresses the professional roles, ethical expectations, and collaborative relationships expected of professional educators at the secondary school level. Attention to pertinent school law and current cases are included.
SCED 4040 Internship in the Secondary School 5 credits
3 class hours
Teaching Hours in the Schools - TBD
Prerequisites: SCED 3000, SCED 3020, and SCED 4010
This course provides teacher candidates an opportunity for full-time, semester-long classroom teaching experience under the direction of an experienced mentor teacher and a college faculty supervisor in a secondary school.
SOCI 1101 Introduction to Sociology 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: None
This course is an introduction to the study of organized social life in America and the world community. Emphasis is placed upon the nature and study of sociology as a science: including the biological, psychological, and hereditary characteristics of the individual as they relate to the students' social nature, physical environment, groups and culture as instruments of socialization, and the more important social relationships such as marriage and family life and race relations.
SOCI 1160 Introduction to Social Problems 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: None
This course is an introduction to the study of the major problems of individuals, families, and communities which emphasizes the social forces tending to disorganize basic groups in American society and the adaptive efforts undertaken to restore effective social order.
SOCI 3700 Sociology of Gender 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: SOCI 1101 or SOCI 1160
Over the past fifty years, feminist scholars have created a rich discussion about the possible sources of gender inequality, detailing, for example, the extent to which the family, the workplace, or heterosexual relations inhibit women from becoming socially empowered and equal to men. In this course, we will review classical and contemporary theories about gender inequality and develop a critical perspective on the ways in which men and women both reproduce and subvert gender inequality globally and within American culture in particular.
SOCI 3900 Sociology of Deviance 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: SOCI 1101 or SOCI 1160
In this course, we will consider what is normal and what is deviant. Both are social inventions, and as such they are relative and forever changing. We will explore the social reality of deviance within contemporary society, investigating the complex ways in which power, inequality and oppression, as well as various legal and moral systems, maintain and reproduce current conceptions of normalcy and deviance in American culture.
SOCI 4100 Social Stratification 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: SOCI 1101 or SOCI 1160
Social stratification is not just a sociological concept; it is the reality that shapes everyone's life. This course will explore the processes of stratification in the United States and other affluent countries. We will focus on the various sources and structures that create and maintain the unequal distributions of wealth, power, and prestige. How are people positioned within these systems of stratification? In answering this primary question, we will also study the effects of education, intelligence, family background, gender, race, industry of employment, and other factors on people's life chances.
SOCI 4200 The Self and Social Existence 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: SOCI 1101 or SOCI 1160
In this course, we will conduct a theoretical evaluation of self and social structure, reviewing the major theories in micro-sociological theory: psychoanalysis, existentialism, symbolic interaction, social construction, and postmodern thought with slight references to behaviorism and cognitive development. The perpetual goal in this course is to provide students with a wide array of analytic tools that will enable them to comprehend the creation of self within the boundaries of history and circumstance.
SPAN 1001 Elementary Spanish I 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: None
Develops your 4 communicative skills--speaking, listening, reading and writing---so as to give the student a basic proficiency in the language (cf. ACTFL Novice Guidelines). Additionally, the class is designed to increase your knowledge of Hispanic culture through the materials presented for reading and conversation.
SPAN 1002 Elementary Spanish II 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: SPAN 1001 or at least one year of Spanish in high school
This course is a continuation of SPAN 1001.
SPAN 2001 Intermediate Spanish I 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: SPAN 1002 or at least two years of Spanish in high school
Develops your 4 communicative skills--speaking, listening, reading and writing---so as to give the student a basic proficiency in the language (cf. ACTFL Intermediate Guidelines). Additionally, the class is designed to increase your knowledge of Hispanic culture through the materials presented for reading and conversation.
SPAN 2002 Intermediate Spanish II 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: SPAN 2001 or at least three years of Spanish in high school
This course is a continuation of SPAN 2001. Continued emphasis on the study of Hispanic culture.
SPAN 3000 Intermediate Grammar 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: SPAN 2002
A study of selected lexical items and grammatical structures and concepts of the Spanish language. The course serves as an introduction to the major in Spanish.
SPAN 3010 Conversation and Composition 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: SPAN 2001 or Instructor approval
Thematic approach to the study of speaking and writing, focusing on the development of the student’s proficiency in spoken and written Spanish. Conversations will be based on communicative situations which the student would encounter in the Spanish-speaking world. Written activities will enable the student to react to typical exchanges which require written responses.
SPAN 3012 Applied Spanish Conversation for Professionals 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: SPAN 2002 or Instructor approval
Practice in both formal and informal discourse for communication in professional settings such as social services, law enforcement, business and health care. Designed for the intermediate-level student, this course focuses on refining fluency through discussions and practical experiences.
SPAN 3014 Language, Culture, and Advanced Composition 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: SPAN 3012 or Instructor approval
Advanced practice in both formal and informal discourse for communication in professional settings such as social services, law enforcement, business, and health care. Conversational practice will focus upon discussing and debating how the historic contemporary cultural realities of the Spanish-speaking world affect language and oral communication.
SPAN 3150 Civilization and Culture of Spain 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: SPAN 2002 or Instructor Approval
Study of the religious, philosophical, geographical, historical, sociopolitical and economic beliefs that form the identity of Spain. Emphasis will be placed on the development of the modern nation, the significance of the Golden Age in Spain’s history, and the major events of the twentieth-century. The works of representative artists, composers, and writers from the various historical periods will be studied.
SPAN 3160 Civilization and Culture of Latin America 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: SPAN 2002 or Instructor approval
Study of the religious, philosophical, geographical, historical, sociopolitical and economic beliefs that form the identity of Latin America. Emphasis will be placed on pre-Columbian societies, Discovery and Conquest, Revolutions and Dictatorships, and Contemporary Latin America.
SPAN 3200 Introduction to Literary Studies in Spanish 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: SPAN 2002 or Instructor approval
Introduction to major representative literary works and some non-canonical texts of Spain and Latin America. The acquisition of critical and organizational skills in reading and their application to Hispanic texts will be emphasized.
SPAN 3250 Survey of Peninsular Literature 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: SPAN 2002 or Instructor approval
Study of representative literary texts from the Middle Ages to the present within their historical context. The development of poetry, drama, and narrative prose will be emphasized.
SPAN 3260 Survey of Latin American Literature I 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: SPAN 2002 or Instructor approval
Survey of selected essays, poems, short stories, and other literary works from the pre-Columbian Latin American societies, the Colonial Period, the Independence Period, and the Latin American Romantic period.
SPAN 3270 Survey of Latin American Literature II 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: SPAN 2002 or Instructor approval
Survey of selected essays, poems, short stories, and other literary works from Modernismo to the end of the twentieth century.
SPAN 4010 Advanced Grammar 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: SPAN 2010 or Instructor approval
Advanced study of the structure of the Spanish language, with emphasis on practical composition and refinement of written expression.
SPAN 4020 Advanced Conversation 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: SPAN 2010 or Instructor approval
Intensive approach to spoken Spanish at the advanced level, with emphasis on increasing the speaking performance level of students and preparing them to take the exit assessment interview, the Oral Proficiency Interview, at the end of their program of study.
SPAN 4110 Spanish Phonetics and Phonology 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: SPAN 2010 or Instructor approval
Introduction to the phonetics and phonemics of the Spanish sound system, including but not limited to phonological analysis and transcription. Emphasis is placed on the study of those sounds found in the dialects of what has been traditionally labeled American Spanish (Mexico, Central America, and the South American highlands); however, important dialectal variations, such as those found in Caribbean and peninsular Spanish, will also be presented.
SPAN 4220 Hispanics Women Writers 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: None
Exploration of the way in which Hispanic women writers have created voices and identities through a variety of textual strategies. A study of the development of feminist discourse through these works will also be covered. Readings may include works from So Juana Ines de la Cruz, Isabel Allende, Julia de Burgos, Luisa Valenzuela, Angeles Maestretta, Rosario Castellanos, Merce Rodoreda, Ester Tusquets, Santa Teresa de Avila, Ana Maria Matute, Carmen Martin Gaite, and Rosa Montero.
SPAN 4240 Golden Age Spanish Literature 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: None
Study of selected texts, literary movements, and the cultural background of Spanish literature of the Golden age (Renaissance and Baroque), including selections of poetry, prose, and drama.
SPAN 4250 Contemporary Spanish Literature 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: None
Study of selected texts, literary movements and the cultural background of contemporary Spanish literature, including selections of poetry, prose and drama.
SPAN 4260 Latin American Prose: The Novel 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: None
Study of selected Latin American novels which reflect the major trends in the development of the genre.
SPAN 4270 Latin American Prose: The Short Story 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: None
Study of selected Latin American short stories which reflect the major trends in the development of the genre.
SPAN 4500 Profession Related Practicum or Study Abroad 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: SPAN 3014 or Instructor approval
Supervised service learning in a Spanish-speaking community or study abroad in a Spanish-speaking country. Appropriate courses in the student’s major field may be substituted.
SPAN 4501 Research Project in Spanish for Professionals 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: SPAN 4500 or Instructor approval
Professional and practical use of oral and written Spanish through the development of a community-based project for improving successful communication with Spanish-speaking clients. An appropriate course in the student’s major field may be substituted.
SPAN 4900 Special Topics 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: None
Special topics in Spanish language or Hispanic literature, civilization, culture. May be repeated up to a maximum of 6 hours if topics are different.
SPAN 4950 Directed Study 1 3 credits
1-3 class hours
Prerequisite: None
Study in an area or topic of Spanish language or Hispanic literature, civilization, or culture not normally found in established courses offered by the department. Students may also study more extensively an area or topic covered by the departmental curriculum. May be repeated up to a maximum of 6 hours if topics are different.
SPAN 4970 Study Abroad Practicum 1 credit hour
1 class hour
Prerequisite: None
Orientation to the study abroad experience. Pre-departure sessions will focus on preparing the student to achieve the maximum learning potential from his/her stay in the selected site. Assigned readings and videos and regular discussion with the supervising instructor will familiarize the student with significant cultural practices that may differ from those of U.S. society and with geographical and historical features of the region as well as prepare him/her to function 443 in the daily life of the community. A series of activities will be designed for the student to complete during the study abroad stay, and upon his/her return, the student will make at least three presentations related to the study abroad experience to university Spanish classes, elementary, middle or high school classes, or community organizations. The course is a requirement for all Spanish majors and minors who participate in a study abroad program. Credit for the course is in addition to other credit earned through the study abroad program. May be repeated up to 3 hours.
SPAN 4980 Community Practicum 1 credit hour
1 class hour Graded as Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory
Prerequisite: None
Supervised volunteer interpreting or translating activities in community schools, service or law enforcement agencies, or business firms. Students will learn basic interpreting and translating skills before beginning their Practicum activities and will develop specialized vocabulary appropriate to their areas of work. Weekly reports and conferences with the supervising instructor are required. Course will be repeated for credit. Field visits comprise 70% of final grade. May be repeated up to three hours.
SPAN 4993 Senior Seminar for eMajor 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: Senior Standing
Capstone course, focused on selected special topics, designed to help students synthesize their knowledge and reinforce the skills they have acquired as Spanish majors. Required of all Spanish eMajors only.
SPED 3110 Survey of Children with Exceptionalities 2 credits
2 class hours
Prerequisite: EDUC 2110 or EDUC 2120 or EDUC 2130
The course provides the teacher candidates an opportunity to survey the specific disabilities and the impact they have on learning for students in grades PK-8. Strategies for academic refinement and modification, social skill development, assistive technologies, and behavior management as well as federal and state legislation will be presented. This course meets the certification requirements for H.B. 671. Guided field experiences are required in inclusionary classrooms.
SPED 3210 Ethics, Policies, and Procedures in Special Education 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: SPED 3110 and Admission to Teacher Education cohort
This course includes the study of policies and procedures, ethical guidelines pertinent to teachers providing special education services, including current laws, ethical standards, federal and state regulations, and individualized education programs.
SPED 3220 Curriculum and Methods for Children with Mild Disabilities 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: RDNG 3410, SPED 3210, Admission to Teacher Education cohort
This course is designed to provide teacher candidates with practical applications of research-based curriculum and methodology utilized in the teaching of students from diverse populations with mild to moderate disabilities in the inclusionary classroom. Appropriate planning, lesson implementation, and monitoring of student progress in collaborative situations are addressed as well as use of assistive technologies for instruction.
SPED 3410 Inclusion of Special Populations 2 credits
2 class hours
Prerequisites: EDUC 2110 or EDUC 2120 or EDUC 2130
The course provides the teacher candidates an opportunity to survey the specific disabilities and the impact they have on learning for students at the middle school and secondary level. Strategies for academic refinement and modification, social skill development, assistive technologies, and behavior management as well as federal and state legislation will be presented. This course meets the certification requirements for H.B. 671. Guided field experiences required in interrelated and inclusionary classrooms.
SPED 3430 Instruction of Special Populations in Middle and Secondary Settings 3 credits
3 Class Hours
Prerequisite: SPED 3410
This course provides instructional and assessment strategies for students with disabilities at the secondary level. Differentiation of core content, appropriate learning and behavioral objectives, and assessment purposes and methods will be provided. Teacher candidates will describe how to differentiate lessons, provide input into Functional Behavioral Assessments, determine behavior management strategies, and adapt assessment for students with diverse learning needs. Transition needs and considerations will also be addressed.
(Middle Grades Education/Secondary Education students only; required)
SPED 4210 Collaboration and Inclusion in the Regular Classroom 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisites: SPED 3210, SPED 3220, ECSP 3120
A course designed to provide teacher candidates with knowledge about the collaborative roles required of various service providers in education, with an emphasis on team interaction, family engagement, and meeting the needs of students with special needs in inclusion settings.
STSK 0010 Study Skills 2 credits
This course emphasizes many of the techniques students need for being successful in their college careers. Topics include time management, note taking, test taking, reading and library usage. The course focus is also oriented around comprehensive critical thinking skills and strategies useful in Humanities, Social Sciences, Natural Sciences, and Mathematics. Entry into STSK 0010 is by choice or placement. Learning support, Institutional credit only.
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THEA 1100 Theatre Appreciation 3 credits
3 class hours
Prerequisite: None
This course is an introduction to various forms of theatrical expression on stage, screen, and television. The course will emphasize the role of the audience as well as the artist. It will focus on the reading of dramatic literature, along with an introduction to play writing, theatre stages, and acting.
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WELL 1001 Nutrition and Weight Control 3 credits
3 class hour
The student will be introduced to basic principles of nutrition and weight control and their application to health and wellness. This course will allow the student to understand factors that influence their dietary choices and the role of certain essential nutrients that will enhance and allow them to maintain optimal health. It is a behaviorally-based program designed to develop skills and positive eating habits as well as knowledge of proper nutrition. The students will assess their eating behaviors and learn to distinguish fact from fiction about trends in nutrition. They will identify potential risks and the role of nutrition in fighting various diseases.
WELL 1002 Healthy Decisions 3 credits
3 class hour
The student will be introduced to concepts regarding behavioral changes and help them identify areas which can be improved. The course will introduce the importance of a global perspective on health and will focus on current risk factors and how they can impact the student's current and future health. The student will learn how both internal and external factors affect their health and how stress can be a major contributor to poor health decisions. Topics covered will focus on risks from harmful habits such as violence and abuse, and addictive behaviors: drugs, alcohol and tobacco. The course will also focus on ways to improve communication skills and how to create and maintain healthy relationships.
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