Math Department News



Dr. Victor Vega with Dayton Ireland, Brad Holloway, Muh Ling Chong, and Melissa James at the annual Field of Dreams Conference.
2016
March 31 - CCGA professor, students develop high-tech programming with new Oculus Rift
February 6 - Math Tutoring Offered at CCGA
2015
May 4 - The textbook dilemma: Georgia's University System looking for cheaper books to help offset the rising cost of tuition
March 20 - Coastal Georgia Math Faculty Awarded Grant to Transform Textbooks
March 20 - CCGA receives grant to teach math through gastronomic methods
February 28 - Area Students Excited for Learning at Math and Science Expo
2014
April 9 - What Can Lego Teach Us About Math
January 21 - Faculty to Present Interactive Programs at Math & Science Expo
2013
November 1 - CCGA's Brightwork Magazine
October 10 - College and County Collaborate to Motivate Young Women
October 9 - Dr. German Vargas, to Chair USG Steering Committee
October 8 - Students Attend Mathematical Field of Dreams Conference
August 14 - College of Coastal Georgia Campus Connection. Issue: August 2013
August 12 - College Welcomes New Teaching Faculty for 2013-2014
July 2 - Mathematics Faculty Claim Bragging Rights
May 1 - Math Student Accepted for Summer Research Program
2012
November 26 - Students Attend 6th Annual Mathematical Field of Dreams Conference
October 15 - College to Host Math and Science Expo Sponsored by Pinova
May 1 -Three Students Accepted for Summer Research Programs
2011
September 27 - CCGA Students to Attend Fifth Annual Mathematical Field of Dreams Conference
August 25 - College of Coastal Georgia Welcomes New Faculty for 2011-12 Academic Year
March 9 - Board of Regents Approves Two New Baccalaureate Degree Programs at the College of Coastal Georgia



Release Date: 03/31/2016

CCGA professor, students develop high-tech programming with new Oculus Rift

Original Source: http://www.thebrunswicknews.com/


German Vargas barely had time to make introductions. He was too excited to begin outlining an advanced, high-tech project he and three students at College of Coastal Georgia have been working on for more than three months.

"I'm sorry to just jump into this, but this is huge. The project we've taken on is very advanced," said Vargas, assistant vice president for academic student engagement and associate professor of mathematics at the college.

In January, Vargas began leading three of his math students through a multi-tiered, highly detailed and technologically progressive project tagged the MATLAB and C# Seminar. Enrolled in the independent study course are college junior Jaki Bonds, and seniors Austin Benton and Jedidah Lindborg.

What exactly is a MATLAB and C# Seminar?

It's a bit complicated, Vargas admits.

Centered on the new tech toy, the Oculus Rift, which only became available to the public Monday, the goal of the course is to create a truly 3D graphing calculator contained in a virtual reality setting.

While 3D calculators have been used for educational endeavors for years, none produce what would be considered a truly 3D graph, Lindborg said.

"When you look at what we've called a 3D image in a textbook or on a page, our brains pull that image out as a 3D representation when it is really still 2D," Lindborg said. "What we wanted to do was create a truly 3D graphic."

And now, the trio of math wizards have done just that.

Through the Oculus Rift virtual reality head-mounted display, students first created a platform for the graphing goals, developing a unique technological programming language and system of checks and balances to work cohesively to create a model that can be duplicated by other Oculus Rift users.

After only several weeks of development, the three students had the foundation they needed to plug in equations and graphing options to begin using the head-mounted monitor, which is paired with infrared and LED cameras, a Unity 3D platform, Leap Motion sensor, pinpoint positioning systems and other elements of advanced technology.

All those elements will be used to create what they describe in their abstract of the project as a "user friendly environment that allows you to control and create new and unique graphs, or gain a deeper understanding of classic ones. The graphs can be manipulated by the user not just by inputting changes in the UI (user interface), but by simply reaching out one's hand and moving the graphs. The end result is a harmony of technology and creativity to bring an old concept into the 21st century. Now we can experience truly three-dimensional graphs in an immersive environment that compels our understanding to a new depth."

Slipping into the head-mounted display, a virtual world appears where the user can pick from one of six equations, which then creates the 3D graph. Users can touch the graph, so to speak, and can even toss around the blocks which make up the waves of graphs that float in a gravity-free world.

"When we showed off the project last week (at the college's SOURCE presentation), that was everyone's favorite thing, destroying the models the equations make," Bonds said.

The three students also get a kick out of roughing up their own virtual graphs, Lindborg said.

"It's great stress relief," he said.

While the MATLAB project plugs in six equations users can select in the current system, they hope to further those options in coming months. Eventually, the students want to develop a pad of mathematical options that users can select from to create their own graphs and develop a variety of equations and other models, Benton said.

For now, the Oculus Rift program they have created will be ideal for advanced calculus, graphing and other math-based academic courses, but further down the road, it can also be used in a multitude of fields, such as in architectural renderings and for medical purposes, as well as in general virtual world gaming systems, they said.

Vargas noted that he was able to obtain an Oculus Rift before it was available to the public because gaming programmers are often allowed early access to such devices to develop programming before the tools hit the shelves.

"This is high-level technology and high-level work, and it is all right here at the College of Coastal Georgia. This is cutting-edge technology and we had it even before it was available to the public," Vargas said.

In coming weeks, Vargas plans to upload his students' model for using the Oculus Rift to the program's social media outlets to share what his students have created. Hopefully, it will receive high praise and become an example for what other academic and technology experts can do.

Watching as his trio of math mechanics showed off their new tool and program, Vargas couldn't wipe the smile off his face as he beamed with pride. Clearly, he was amazed by the hard work, dedication and creative design implemented by his pupils.

"These students are brilliant, just amazing," Vargas said. "And what our students created, this is a model for what others can do with this awesome new technology. What they have created is genius."


Release Date: 02/06/2016

Math Tutoring Offered at CCGA

Original Source: http://www.thebrunswicknews.com/


Even Laura Lynch will admit math is not the easiest subject to master and that means a lot coming from the department chair and assistant professor of mathematics at College of Coastal Georgia.

“It is a hard topic for a lot of people, I know that,” Lynch said.

But have no fear — Lynch and her team of tutors are here to help.

Lynch, along with four paid tutors and several volunteers from the college, will be offering math tutoring courses this semester. Stretching from February to May, the courses will be open to the entire community and held on the first and third Saturday mornings of the month.

“We’re here for everyone — high schoolers, middle schoolers, elementary schoolers and even for college students,” Lynch said.

Whether a student is studying to take the ACT or SAT exams to enter college or is currently a college student needing extra help or a young pupil wanting advanced lessons on certain math subjects, all are welcome, she said.

“We never turn anyone away,” Lynch said.

The tutoring course is based on a pilot project launched last October that was the brainchild of Lynch and the president of the college math and engineering club, Erina Bista.

With the goal of beginning a service learning project, the duo reached out to the two area high schools, Glynn Academy and Brunswick High, to recruit students who needed extra assistance.

Lynch discovered that algebra was the subject students struggle with the most, she said.

“We use math every day, even if we don’t realize it,” Lynch said.

“We really don’t know who or how many people will come out to get help, but the more the merrier.”

Students being tutored are asked to enter the campus from the Altama Avenue access point across from Brunswick High School.

The sessions will be held on the second floor of the Correll Teacher Education Building.


Release Date: 05/04/2015

The textbook dilemma: Georgia's University System looking for cheaper books to help offset the rising cost of tuition

Original Source: http://jacksonville.com/news/georgia/2015-05-04/story/textbook-dilemma-georgias-university-system-looking-cheaper-books-help

ATLANTA | The Board of Regents may be boosting tuition by 9 percent this year at the state’s major universities while the overall economy’s inflation rate is essentially zero, but the University System of Georgia is trying to find less expensive textbooks.

Book prices have also outpaced inflation, rising 82 percent in the last decade, according to U.S. PIRG Education Fund.

By its own reckoning, the system will save students and their parents $9 million this year through various initiatives.

In addition to the savings, the innovations have the potential to also improve what students are learning.

“What we’re after is trying to keep students and make them be successful,” said Merryll Penson, executive director of library services.

Textbook publishers say the reason their materials are so pricey is the same one college administrators use to explain the continuous tuition increases: quality.

“Books cost what they cost because they are expensive to produce,” said David Anderson, executive director for higher education at the Association of American Publishers.

Between accommodating multiple authors, editors, precision-graphics designers and extensive peer reviews, a typical textbook takes about 17,000 person hours and from $500,000 to $3 million to produce, not counting the cost of printing and shipping. Typically, the publisher only has three semesters to recover those costs in a very limited market.

Within Georgia, the University System started by discovering what textbooks are assigned the most often and seeking discounts for bulk purchases. It has also nudged faculty departments across the state to consider adopting more of the same books for the core courses like English composition and history.

A $200 algebra book can become much more affordable when publishers see a larger order.

“What we learned in talking with faculty: not that they’re insensitive, but they’re not the ones buying the books,” Penson said.

So the system’s librarians are leading the effort to make professors more sensitive. They are also making them more aware of the free materials the libraries already offer, including hundreds of free textbooks online through the 20-year-old GALILEO (Georgia Library Learning Online) network as well as through other university systems.

Use of the free, online texts at Savannah State University, for instance, will save students $100,000 just in its first-year-experience course, a required class of all entering freshmen.

“At the beginning of each semester, librarians were struck by the number of students who wanted to borrow — even outdated copies — textbooks rather than buy their own,” according to one of the school’s internal memos.

“To assist students, the library began to purchase copies of textbooks and placed them on two-hour reserves. While offering some help to students who were unable to purchase their text, librarians agreed that this was just a bandage (and not a very big one) in providing students with the resources needed to progress successfully and graduate on time.”

The librarians began a campaign to convince professors to assign free, online textbooks instead. They didn’t want to do anything to restrict academic freedom, just try to get more cooperation.

At the College of Coastal Georgia, they got some help from the chairman of the mathematics department, German Vargas. He jokes that going door-to-door talking to colleagues in other disciplines made him feel like he was in a different profession.

“By the third time that I did this, I was beginning to sound like a salesman. … I’m getting 15 percent [commission] on $0, which is what it will cost our students,” he quipped.

Although it took some convincing, some faculty came around.

Throughout the University System, professors are being encouraged to assemble their own texts if they don’t like what’s already available free and online. That’s what Vargas and his team have done with four of the most popular math courses.

But there are drawbacks to that approach.

One is the prohibition against including material copyrighted by someone else. Georgia State University is in the eighth year of a lawsuit over its faculty’s alleged copyright violations.

That means professors must either write their own material or sift through the millions of scholarly documents available that aren’t copyrighted. It can be a big job, according to American Publishers’ Anderson.

The industry isn’t deaf to the complaints about costs. It’s developed creative solutions of its own.

It’s tackling the issue of affordability by developing “digital learning platforms.”

Instead of merely putting the contents of a textbook online, they are creating a package of interactive applications and materials. Using a smartphone, laptop or tablet computer, the students can read chapters, watch animated illustrations, take quizzes and communicate with their professors.

Faculty can alter the material, reorder the chapters and monitor students’ progress to determine what classroom instruction should focus on.

The digital texts are easier to keep current and ultimately cheaper to produce, Anderson said, because they are assembled from expertly done components rather than the costly, start-to-finish peer reviews for conventional textbooks. Plus, the interactivity boosts student performance, he said.

“It’s ever so much more engaging, and you’re taking in so much more information,” he said.



Release Date: 03/20/2015

Coastal Georgia Math Faculty Awarded Grant to Transform Textbook

Brunswick, GA – Coastal Georgia math faculty have been awarded a grant to transform expensive textbooks into easily accessible and readily affordable online resources, saving students hundreds of dollars. The team tackling the task includes Dr. Jose Lugo, Dr. Laura Lynch, Dr. Jamil Mortada, Professor Treg Thompson, Dr. Victor Vega-Vasquez, and Dr. German Vargas, Department Chair. The math textbooks are the most commonly required for college degrees - algebra, trigonometry, precalculus, and probability and statistics – currently costing from $168 to $342 each.

Their proposal would reduce the cost to less than $33 per textbook by hosting the course materials on the D2L learning platform accessed online: e-textbooks. “Our goal is to promote access and affordability of higher education by adopting low-cost alternatives of textbooks and other educational resources. We want to transform four of the top-50 University System of Georgia’s lower-division core curriculum courses, all in mathematics, without compromising the content standards,” Dr. Vargas explained. “The broad focus of this initiative will target almost every student at CCGA and we expect not only to make college more affordable for those that we already serve but also to help bridge that gap that deters many potential students from considering college as an opportunity for upward mobility.”

Team members will develop PowerPoint presentations to be used for classroom instruction, link via webpage to additional free content resources, align course content to master syllabi, obtain qualitative feedback from students and faculty, compare test results and assessments – all through an online resource already commonly used by Coastal Georgia students. Their timeline calls for a preliminary introduction of the e-textbooks during fall semester 2015, followed by assessment and large-scale implementation in spring 2016.

“Based on student survey results, changes in the content and organization of the course will be implemented as need,” Dr. Vargas noted. “The program faculty will review the materials and results annually, adjusting as appropriate. We don’t expect additional expenses, as all materials will be free and openly available. We will just need to fine-tune the resources as we progress in implementation.”

As many as 2,000 students in almost 60 sections of courses each academic year will benefit from the transformation to more affordable material, according to estimates by Dr. Lance Carluccio, Interim Vice President for Academic Affairs. “The faculty of the mathematics department are demonstrating the type of impact that faculty can have in significantly making college more affordable and reducing students debt,” he said.

Dr. Keith Belcher, Dean of the School of Arts and Sciences, agreed. “As an open access institution many of our students take more than one mathematics course in their chosen program of study. This coupled with the fact that textbook costs are consistently increasing often presents financial stress to students with limited means.”

The Textbook Transformation Grant was awarded by the University System of Georgia through their Affordable Learning Georgia Initiative. The Coastal Georgia proposal was one of 78 submitted by 25 institutions and one of 18 selected in the category of “Transformations at Scale” according to the notification received by the team members.
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Release Date: 3/20/2015
Source: College of Coastal Georgia

Media Contact:
John Cornell
O: 912.279.5703
C: 912.223.9997
jcornell@ccga.edu



Release Date: 03/20/2015

CCGA receives grant to teach math through gastronomic methods

Original Source: http://www.thebrunswicknews.com/news/local_news/ccga-receives-grant-to-teach-math-through-gastronomic-methods/article_5a20490a-e986-50ad-ba48-57a0e16f929f.html

Not all students love math, but odds are, most of them enjoy food.

Which is why the College of Coastal Georgia’s School of Education and Teacher Preparation has tapped into gastronomic methods to help current and future teachers create a love for learning in students.

It was announced this week the school of education has been awarded a state Improving Teacher Quality grant. The funds will be used to launch an innovative outreach proposal, one that will assist teachers in providing practical math lessons in the classroom through cooking and food science.

The multi-discipline approach combines teaching methods from the college’s education, arts and sciences, culinary arts and business and public affairs programs.

“The overarching goal of this project is to provide quality professional learning experiences targeted for grades four to eight teachers that expand the scope of their mathematics content knowledge through the culinary arts,” said Sharon Sellers-Clark, assistant professor of education. “The strategies should integrate students’ perception of mathematics with their everyday lives, deepen their conceptual knowledge of mathematical and scientific processes, develop students’ problem solving and critical thinking skills, and improve students’ interest through real-world application.”

Courtenay Miller, assistant professor of mathematics education, and Laura Lynch, assistant professor of mathematics, will serve as project co-directors.

Math curriculum for students in 4th and 5th grade, as well as in middle school, focuses on integral skills that are prominent in cooking and the food service industry. By applying real-world situations to the math theories learned in the classroom, students will be able to more thoroughly grasp concepts, Sellers-Clark said.

“In grades four and five, the combination of math and cooking includes multiplication, division, fractions, decimals, scaling/resizing, measurement, conversion and word problems ranging from time intervals to money, cost and portion sizes,” Sellers-Clark said. “In grades six through eight, math education includes concepts such as ratios, percentages, proportions and equations, all of which can be illustrated through cooking.”

Twelve teachers in the Glynn County, Dooley County and Camden County public school systems will be invited to participate in the two-week summer workshop centered on using food as a math motivator.

United Way of Coastal Georgia will serve as a community partner, recruiting up to 24 students in grades four to eight through sponsored summer enrichment programs that provide children with hands-on experiences.

“We are combining intensive teacher training with appropriately aged children to test the effectiveness of this approach,” Sellers-Clark said. “The culinary arts consultants are developing six recipes that can be used in the classroom and will train the instructors in food preparation. The co-directors will provide guidance in tying together the recipes and the state standards for lesson plans. They will also visit the participating teachers’ classrooms during the fall to provide support and ensure successful implementation.”

From buying groceries to making bread, cobblers and lasagna, math is part of the cooking process, Sellers-Clark said.

“This is using a practical application to develop lesson plans that instructors will then test with real students during the workshop,” she said.



Release Date: 02/28/2015

Area Students Excited for Learning at Math and Science Expo

Original Source: http://www.thebrunswicknews.com/news/local_news/area-students-excited-for-learning-at-math-and-science-expo/article_28db5b52-0245-5ca3-ae8f-40e90aadf7a1.html

Lucy Zheng was on a roll, correctly answering question after question, each with the distinct ring of her buzzer.

“Negative 8. Fourteen,” Zheng answered to the various math problems posted before the group of students from Glynn Academy.

Beside her, teammate Blake Jones was clearly stunned by his peer’s quick problem solving skills and her ongoing spell of correct answers.

“Geez, Lucy, give us a chance,” Jones laughed.

Zheng, Jones and their Glynn Academy teammates were one of 33 teams to participate Friday in the annual Math and Science Expo held at College of Coastal Georgia.

Three years ago, the college replaced its annual science fair with the expo, which is a project of the School of Arts and Sciences.

This year, the academic affair saw a huge jump in participation. Last year, only 13 teams registered for the expo, but this go round, 33 teams signed on.

Most likely the shift can be linked to the day of the games, as well as the enthusiasm growing around the event in schools in the area, said Laura Lynch, an organizer of the expo and an associate math professor at the college.

“In the past, we’ve held the expo on a Saturday,” she said. “This year, with it being on a Friday, we’re able to use school transportation to bus students in, which makes it a lot easier for students to get here. Plus, it also means a day out of school, even though they are still learning. It’s a win-win.”

Students in the 2015 expo came from Glynn Academy, Brunswick High School, Frederica Academy and Wayne County High School, as well as from a handful of area middle schools, Lynch said.

Aside from the fast-paced competition bowl portion of the expo, which featured a timed team test and a “Jeopardy!” style buzz-in answer quiz, the event featured science and math-based learning activities, such as a rat dissection, a pinhole camera project and a creative computing and game development class.

Though the expo has only been at College of Coastal Georgia for three years, the event itself has been around for decades, sending winners to state competitions in Savannah, and national competitions in Washington, D.C.

Frederica Academy science teacher Tom Willis has taken his students to science and math expos for more than 20 years. This year, he saw the educational event come full circle when a former student and expo participant of his brought his own students from Brunswick High School to the expo.

“It’s great to see how much of an impact this event has on our students,” Willis said. “This is a day that energizes them and helps them see how learning can really be fun. We spend the whole year getting our teams ready and it’s a great day when it finally comes. Any time we can get our kids excited about learning, that’s a great thing.”



Release Date: 04/09/2014

What Can Lego Robots Teach Us About Math

Original Source: https://www.leapmotion.com/blog/what-can-lego-robots-teach-us-about-math/

Who says Lego is just for kids? With the Lego Mindstorm series, people around the globe are able to easily build and program their own customizable robots. Recently, Dr. German Vargas, mathematics chair at the College of Coastal Georgia, decided to combine his Mindstorm EV3 set with another hackable toy – the Leap Motion Controller.

When the integration was ready, Dr. Vargas decided to have a little fun with it – concealing a laptop under his jacket and looping the Controller’s USB cord through his sleeve. “It was fun to drive the robot around campus while hiding the laptop running the program under my jacket, but the best part was to respond to the question “where did you get that?” with “I built it and I programmed it!”

Getting started with Lego Mindstorms

While Dr. Vargas originally considered using an Arduino, he discovered that the MonoBrick Communication Libraries let him integrate everything into a single project – receiving data from the Leap Motion SDK and sending it immediately to the EV3 motors, all within C#. By downloading this compressed folder on his website, you can find his Visual Studio 2013 project, which in turn contains the full source code and linked libraries. You can also download the integration source code here.

Right now, the program works by feeding information to two motors. However, it’s also easily extendible to access all the functionalities with the MonoBrick communication libraries. By playing with certain sections of code, you can modify the integration to make your robot respond to other inputs, like the number of fingers.

After posting his original video, Dr. Vargas took his work with EV3 to the next level. In the next video, you can see how he controls the robot remotely by watching video feedback from a mounted camera via AirServer. He uses pitch to move forward and backward, yaw to turn left and right, and his hand’s position in the Y axis to control a small robotic arm.

Science rules

When people understand how to program simple machines, they get a whole new understanding of the world. By showing how concepts from the classroom can bring robots to life, Dr. Vargas hopes to inspire his students to explore other applications.

The Mindstorm programming interface allows educators to target a broad audience, and gives you the opportunity to make the programming experience both accessible and challenging for groups of all ages. It doesn’t matter how young or old you are, once you start seeing that robot react to your commands, your attention is completely captured and your level of interest naturally rises.

In general it provides a great opportunity to engage the public in the STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) disciplines. Connecting what we see in the classroom to fun, real-world applications makes mathematics much more enticing. I’m just starting to develop things with the Leap Motion Controller, but I can just imagine teaching concepts like coordinate systems and vectors.


Building simple robots also teaches logic, the foundation of all programming, says Dr. Vargas. Students are challenged to disassemble tasks into small instructions that the robot can understand. Instead of saying “move there and grab the box,” they learn to break ideas into sequences. Other important math concepts – sets, representations, coordinate systems, functions, normalization of values, vectors, radius of curvature, array manipulation – start to emerge. Concepts start to make intuitive sense. Magic happens.

Has building a robot, designing an app, or just playing with your Lego bricks ever changed how you see the world? How would you like to see motion-controlled robotics used in the classroom?




Release Date: 01/21/2014

Faculty to Present Interactive Programs at Math & Science Expo

Competition and Fun for Area Students

Brunswick, GA – The College of Coastal Georgia is hosting a Math & Science Expo, sponsored by Pinova, on Saturday, February 22. Middle and high school students, parents and teachers from Brantley, Camden, Charlton, Glynn, McIntosh and Wayne counties are invited to participate in activities offered by the School of Arts and Sciences. The program includes lunch at the Southeast Georgia Conference Center on campus.

Students can choose to participate in an activity or compete in one of the Academic Bowls. The activities run concurrently between 9:30-11:45 a.m., including teachers’ and parents’ programs. Awards will be presented following lunch at noon.

For the Academic Bowls, teams of up to six students can compete for school trophies and individual medals in either the middle school level or the high school level tournaments. In the tournament matches, teams challenge each other to determine who knows more about mathematics and the sciences.

The interactive actives for students include several faculty-led workshops:

  • Building a working pinhole camera and developing the photographs, hosted by Jeff LeMieux, Associate Professor of Art;
  • Designing, constructing and programming robots with the Lego NXT robotics system, hosted by Dr. German Vargas, Assistant Professor of Mathematics and chair of the Department of Mathematics;
  • Listening to the human body using a simulation mannequin, hosted by Lee Eades, Simulation Specialist and Assistant Professor of Nursing, and Joyce Tate, Clinical Assistant Professor of Nursing;
  • Estimating distance through the ages, from right triangles as used by early Egyptians to the contemporary iOS app, hosted by Treg Thompson, Assistant Professor of Mathematics;
  • Understanding the properties of lenses, light and seeing, hosted by Dr. Ntungwa Maasha, Professor of Physics and Geology;
  • Synthesizing aspirin, hosted by Dr. Andrea Wallace, Professor of Chemistry and chair of the Department of Natural Sciences;
  • Excavating fossils from coastal sites, hosted by Camden Center instructor Sibille Chalkley and lab coordinator Kelly Clark;
  • Exploring the structure and function of the human eye, hosted by James Carpenter, Assistant Profeesor of Biology;
  • Dissecting a rat, hosted by Dr. Ann McGlaughlin.
  • Using concepts from immunohematology for forensic investigation of a crime, hosted by Robin Bradshaw, Lecturer of Clinical Laboratory Technology, and Dr. Keith Belcher, Profeesor of Biology and Dean of the School of Arts and Sciences.

Teachers can choose one of three programs:

  • The Importance of Incorporating Primates in the K-12 Curriculum, hosted by Dr. Karen Hambright, Professor of Psychology;
  • Scientific Methodology in the Social Sciences, hosted by Dr. Kimberly Mannahan, Assistant Professor of Psychology;
  • Influence of Ecological Research on the American Environmental Movement, Dr. Christopher Wilhelm, Assistant Professor of History.

Parents will be offered the opportunity to meet College faculty, staff and students, learn more about the College undergraduate degrees and ACCEL (dual high school/college enrollment) programs, hear about the admissions and financial aid processes, and tour the campus.

For more information about Expo participation, contact Joan Rozmarynoski at jrozmarynoski@ccga.edu or 912.279.5880. Registration is available online: http://www2.ccga.edu/Academics/SchoolMNS/MathScienceExpo.asp

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Release Date: 1/21/2014
Source: College of Coastal Georgia

Media Contact:
John Cornell
O: 912.279.5703
C: 912.223.9997
jcornell@ccga.edu



Release Date: 11/01/2013

CCGA's Brightwork Magazine

Math club members Michael Johnston ’14 and Melissa James ’14 have spent Tuesdays during the fall semester tutoring teens in math through robotics at the Correll Teen Center in Brunswick.

· See pages 10-11 for information on Dr. Lynch’s Service-Learning initiatives and Dr. Vargas’ robotics program with help from math majors Melissa James and Michael Johnston

· See page 30 for an introduction to Dr. Jose Lugo

· See page 31 for Dr. Vargas’ work with a statewide steering committee




Release Date: 10/10/2013

College and County Collaborate to Motivate Young Women

Corporate Sponsorship for the Program Is Provided by Pinova

Brunswick, GA - Eleven College faculty members will present fun and fascinating workshops to girls in grades 5-8 to encourage them to take science and math classes and consider careers in related fields. Community volunteers developed six additional workshops on topics ranging from veterinary medicine and watersheds to GPS and marine debris. The girls and their parents will be participating in Expanding Your Horizons Day, sponsored by Pinova, on campus Saturday, November 2, beginning at 9 a.m. in the Southeast Georgia Conference Center.

The program opens with words of welcome from Dr. Gregory Aloia, College President, and Sung Hui Lewis, Assistant Superintendent of Glynn County Schools. Susan Shipman, Chair of the St. Simons Land Trust Board of Directors, will be the keynote speaker. Shipman is former director of the Coastal Resources Division of the Georgia Department of Natural Resources.

Faculty members presenting workshop programs for Expanding Your Horizons include:

  • “Bubbly Bakers” with Dr. Jennifer Hatchell, Assistant Professor of Biology
  • “Fun with Acids and Bases” with Dr. Andrea Wallace, Professor of Chemistry
  • “Geometry Jumble” with Dr. Laura Lynch, Assistant Professor of Mathematics
  • “Looking into Radiologic Science” with Bonnie M. Tobias, Assistant Professor of Radiologic Science
  • “Nursing, Sciences and Simulation” with Diane Denton, Associate Professor of Nursing
  • “Papermaking” with Mike Huber, Part-time Instructor of Chemistry
  • “Physics and Fun Everywhere!” with Dr. Ntungwa Maasha, Professor of Physics and Geology
  • “Polymers Are Slimy” with Dr. Leon Gardner, Assistant Professor of Chemistry
  • “Science and Math Can Be Fun!” with Dr. Sarah Hartman, Assistant Professor of Education
  • “The Eyes Have It” with James Carpenter, Assistant Professor of Biology
  • “What Is an Anemone and Why Are They Awesome?” with Dr. David Stasek, Assistant Professor of Biology

Approximately 250 girls participated in the campus program last November. Dr. Joan Boorman, Director of Testing and Grants, Glynn County Schools, serves as the coordinator of the event for the school system.

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Release Date: 10/10/2013
Source: College of Coastal Georgia

Media Contact:
John Cornell
O: 912.279.5703
C: 912.223.9997
jcornell@ccga.edu



Release Date: 10/09/2013

Dr. German Vargas, to Chair USG Steering Committee

Brunswick, GA – Dr. German Vargas, Chair of the Department of Mathematics, has been appointed chair of the University System of Georgia’s ad hoc steering committee to implement the recommendations of the special report published in July on improving success rates in gateway mathematics courses across the state system.

During the past two years, Coastal Georgia’s Department of Mathematics has been actively involved in redesigning learning support curriculum and innovative instruction for mathematics to increase retention, progression and graduation without compromising the integrity of the mathematical content. “The tenacity of our faculty combined with the progressiveness of our institution has allowed our department to be one of the pioneers of these initiatives within the USG,” Dr. Vargas said. “The initiatives are part of the College’s commitment to support the Complete College Georgia vision and strategy for developing a workforce that will ensure a bright future for the state’s residents through a markedly increased percentage of post-secondary degrees and more graduates in science, technology, engineering and mathematics – the STEM fields that translate into superior economic development.”

As a result of these efforts at Coastal Georgia, Dr. Vargas was appointed in January to serve as a member of USG’s Task Force on the Role of Mathematics in College Completion. The task force was comprised of eight mathematics leaders from some of the most influential schools in Georgia, such as Georgia Tech and UGA, and was led by senior administrators from USG and nationally-renowned consultants, including Dr. P. Uri Treisman, Professor of Mathematics and Professor of Public Affairs at The University of Texas at Austin and Director of the Charles A. Dana Center.

The six-month projected culminated this summer in a report, University System of Georgia: Transforming College Mathematics. According to Dr. Vargas, the report calls for innovation and statewide implementation of eight recommendations to increase the success rate in gateway mathematics courses and improve retention, progression and graduation of students.

To direct the implementation of the report’s recommendations, the USG tasked the Academic Advisory Committee of Mathematical Subjects (ACMS) to form the ad hoc steering committee. Dr. Vargas, current chair-elect of the ACMS, was appointed to chair the task force. “I’m looking forward to the new challenge,” Dr. Vargas concluded.

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Release Date: 10/9/2013
Source: College of Coastal Georgia

Media Contact:
John Cornell
O: 912.279.5703
C: 912.223.9997
jcornell@ccga.edu



Release Date: 10/08/2013

Students Attend Mathematical Field of Dreams Conference

Brunswick, GA –Five College of Coastal Georgia math students were selected from more than 300 students nationally to participate in the Seventh Annual Mathematical Field of Dreams Conference sponsored by the National Alliance for Doctoral Studies in the Mathematical Sciences in Mesa, Arizona, during November 1-3. Student attendance is by invitation only and includes payment of all travel, hotel and conference expenses. The students were nominated by Dr. Victor Vega-Vazquez, an Alliance member, student mentor, and Associate Professor of Mathematics in the School of Arts and Sciences. The students who attended were:
  • Erina Bista ’16 of Darien
  • Muh Ling Chong ‘14 of Jekyll Island, attending for her second year
  • Bradley Holloway ‘14 of Brunswick, attending for his second year
  • Wallace Ireland ’14 of Brunswick, attending for his third consecutive year
  • Melissa James ‘14 of Woodbine, attending for her second year

Holloway already holds a BS in mathematics and is completing his BBA.

“It is phenomenal that our young program is getting such attention from national programs like the Alliance. We are preparing our students for a bright future in the mathematical sciences and people are noticing,” Dr. Vega-Vazquez said. “I am pleased and extremely happy for this recognition of our program. Of course, our students are the ones that deserve the credit for their outstanding work. The director of the Alliance has scheduled a visit to our campus later in November to meet and talk to our students and faculty, as well as to President Aloia, so we must be doing something right.”

During the conference, the students will learn about different degree opportunities in the mathematical sciences, paths to earn a doctorate, tips for graduate school selection and application, and career opportunities once the Ph.D. is achieved. Networking is also an important component, according to Dr. Vega-Vazquez. “Coastal Georgia is assuredly a College of Choice for students who are interested in the STEM disciplines. The future has never looked brighter for mathematics.”

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Release Date: 10/8/2013
Source: College of Coastal Georgia

Media Contact:
John Cornell
O: 912.279.5703
C: 912.223.9997
jcornell@ccga.edu



Release Date: 08/14/2013

College of Coastal Georgia Campus Connection. Issue: August 2013

At the end of spring term, robotics enthusiasts from the Department of Mathematics visitied the Southeast Georgia Health System (SGHS) to interact with the DaVinci Surgical System, pictured below. The DaVinci system, which is valued at just under $2 million, enables surgeons to operate remotely from a console to facilitate complex operations while minimizing patient invasion - reducing physical constraints such as the size of the surgeon's hands and the size of the incision. The students and faculty were able to see practical application of classroom material, such as the programming classes offered by the department. Dr. Darrin Strickland from Southeastern OB/GYN in Brunswick hosted the visit.

Math Dept in OR

Dr. German Vargas (right), Chair of the Department of Mathematics, with Math & Engineering Club members at the SGHS.

This fall, the math department is starting a Kinect Development Group, which uses the Kinect for Windows Sensor from Microsoft as a tool to engage students in the creative processes connected with STEM disciplines. Kinect facilitates natural interaction with computers through voice and gestures. For more information about an interdisciplinary program, contact Dr. Vargas at

gvargas@ccga.edu.


Release Date: 08/12/2013

College Welcomes New Teaching Faculty for 2013-2014

Brunswick, GA – Nine new faculty members have joined the full-time teaching staff of the College of Coastal Georgia for the new academic year.

Stephanie Conner, Lecturer of English and Academic Advisor Conner has worked as a part-time English instructor at the College since 2009 as well as tutoring privately in composition, reading comprehension and study skills for over a decade. Prior teaching experience includes six years at the secondary school level. She earned her MA and BA in English from Valdosta State University.

Dr. C. Tate Holbrook, Assistant Professor of Biology Prior to joining the faculty of Coastal Georgia, Dr. Holbrook served as Visiting Assistant Professor of Biology at Lynchburg College in Virginia for two years. He received his PhD in Biology from Arizona State University and graduated summa cum laude from the University of North Carolina at Asheville with a BS in Biology, concentration in ecology and evolution. For eight years he has served as a consultant and writer for Ask a Biologist (http://askabiologist.asu.edu), an educational resource for preK-12 students and their parents and teachers.

Dr. Jose L. Lugo, Assistant Professor of Mathematics Dr. Lugo received his PhD in Mathematics from Purdue University, where he studied functional analysis with a focus on the theory of C*-algebras. He received a 2011 Researcher Visit Award from the Centre de Recerca in Barcelona, Spain, for a one-month research visit funded by a grant from the National Science Foundation and the Dr. Francisco Garriga Medal, the highest honor for a graduating student majoring in Mathematics awarded by the School of Natural Sciences, University of Puerto Rico.

Nicole Masano, Assistant Professor of Nursing A registered nurse with 20 years of experience and a certified nurse midwife, Masano served as adjunct faculty in the maternal child nursing track of the Coastal Georgia BSN program earlier this year. Since 2011, she has served as adjunct faculty in the nursing informatics track of Kaplan University’s graduate program. From 2006-2009, she was the clinical educator of labor and delivery at Edward Hospital, Naperville, Illinois, and prior to that, the clinical educator, charge nurse and staff nurse at Swedish Covenant Hospital and clinical instructor at Loyola University in Chicago. She earned her certificate in Health Informatics, MSN in Nurse Midwifery and BSN from the University of Illinois at Chicago.

Dorothy M. Miller, Assistant Professor of Nursing Prior to joining Coastal Georgia faculty, Miller was an assistant professor for four years at Albany State University with previous experience as a clinical adjunct instructor at the University of South Carolina and Midlands Technical College, as a staff nurse, and as an insurance quality review coordinator, utilization review coordinator and medical claims reviewer. She earned her MSN in Nursing Education from Regis University in Denver and BSN from Landers University in Greenville, South Carolina.

Dr. Michael P. Morris, Assistant Professor of History Prior to joining Coastal Georgia faculty, Dr. Miller served as history instructor at Augusta Technical College and Assistant Professor of History at Dalton State College for five years and at Jacksonville State University for three years. He received his PhD in History from Auburn University, his master’s from Georgia Southern University, and graduated summa cum laude from Augusta State University with a BA in History.

Dr. David Mulry, Chair, Department of Arts and Humanities, and Professor of English
Dr. Mulry studied in England and has taught in England, France, Greece and the U.S. He received his PhD in English from the University of Kent in Canterbury and his BA in Humanities with honors from Middlesex Polytechnic University in London. Prior to joining the faculty of Coastal Georgia, Dr. Mulry was Professor of English at Schreiner University in Texas for six years, where he received the Schreiner Award for Excellence in Research, Scholarship and Creative Activity in 2009 and had served as chair of the English and Foreign Languages Department for four years.

Matthew L. Raiford, Visiting Assistant Professor of Culinary Arts and Program Coordinator
Chef Raiford was the Executive Chef of The Lodge at Little St. Simons Island prior to joining Coastal Georgia faculty with responsibilities for coordination and public presentation of the culinary arts program related to the development and operation of the new student-managed restaurant on Jekyll Island. He has 20 years of professional culinary experience. The Brunswick native is a graduate of The Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, New York, with post-graduate work at the University of California Santa Cruz Center for Agroecology and Sustainable Food Systems.

Dr. Ronald S. Reigner, Associate Professor of Reading/Language Arts Prior to joining Coastal Georgia faculty, Dr. Reigner was with the University of West Georgia for 13 years as Assistant, then Associate, Professor and Director of the Reading Clinic. He has extensive experience as a reading specialist and instructor. Dr. Reigner received his PhD and Med from the University of Illinois at Chicago and his BA from Emory University.

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Release Date: 8/12/2013
Source: College of Coastal Georgia

Media Contact:
John Cornell
O: 912.279.5703
C: 912.223.9997
jcornell@ccga.edu



Release Date: 07/02/2013

Mathematics Faculty Claim Bragging Rights

Dr. German Vargas, chair of the Department of Mathematics, was delighted to share some excellent new about the results of the Educational Testing Service (ETS) Major Field Test in Mathematics in June. The department's first two graduates, Robert Chastain and Stuart Pierson, achieved scores resulting in an institutional mean of 172 - placing the College in the top 4% among 339 domestic institutions which have participated in the test since 2004. "We are thrilled to receive these results - clear indication of the effort all the faculty are putting into their classes to ensure our students are receiving top quality mathematics education," Dr. Vargas said. Chastain will continue his math studies in the graduate program of The University of Nevada at Reno.

Junior Matthew Cullens is participating in a research program at Brigham Young University in Utah. The math major from Soperton, Georgia is doing research in condensed matter physics. The summer program is funded by the National Science Foundation. Read what some other math students are suggesting.




Release Date: 05/01/2013

Math Student Accepted for Summer Research Program

Brunswick, GA – Junior Matthew Cullens will be out of town this summer, participating in a research program at Brigham Young University in Utah.

From June 8 through August 17, the math major from Soperton, Georgia will be doing research in condensed matter physics. The summer program is funded by the National Science Foundation.

“Some of our math students have expressed interest in doing undergraduate research as independent study during the summer months, remaining here rather than traveling,” Dr. Victor Vega, Associate Professor of Mathematics, noted. “Having students who want to work in higher order mathematics is highly motivating, particularly as their only reward is the challenge of doing good mathematics. As a faculty member, such enthusiasm is very exciting.”

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Release Date: 5/1/2013
Source: College of Coastal Georgia

Media Contact:
John Cornell
O: 912.279.5703
C: 912.223.9997
jcornell@ccga.edu



Release Date: 11/26/2012

Students Attend 6th Annual Mathematical Field of Dreams Conference

Brunswick, GA –Four College of Coastal Georgia students were tapped to attend the Sixth Annual Mathematical Field of Dreams Conference sponsored by the National Alliance for Doctoral Studies in the Mathematical Sciences in Mesa, Arizona, earlier this month. Student attendance is by invitation only and includes payment of travel, hotel and conference expenses. The students were nominated by Dr. Victor Vega-Vazquez, an Alliance member, student mentor, and Associate Professor of Mathematics in the School of Arts and Sciences. The students who attended were:
  • Melissa James of Woodbine, a junior mathematics major;
  • Wallace Ireland of Brunswick, a junior mathematics major who also attended last year;
  • Muh Lin Chong of Brunswick, a junior mathematics major; and
  • Bradley Holloway of Brunswick, who already holds a BS in mathematics and is pursuing a BBA.

“Last year we introduced our new baccalaureate degree in mathematics and we were excited to have three of our students invited to attend. This year we have an additional participant, which speaks well of our program, and our students are not only receiving a great math education, but they also enjoy additional opportunities outside the campus,” Dr. Vega-Vazquez said.

In a series of conference panel discussions, the students learned about different degree opportunities in the mathematical sciences, paths to earn a doctorate, graduate school selection and application, tips for graduate school success, and career opportunities once the Ph.D. is achieved. Dr. Vega-Vazquez was a featured panelist this year, discussing his own experiences as a graduate student and as a mathematics professor.

“This year, the Field of Dreams Conference focused on graduate and recent graduate experiences and all the opportunities available to future students in the mathematical sciences, as well the other science, technology and engineering (STEM) disciplines. Our students had the opportunity to directly interact with graduate students and faculty from around the country, learning about their experiences in graduate school as well as all the different ways to succeed” he explained.

According to Dr. Vega-Vazquez, that interaction encouraged James, who will graduate in May 2014, to pursue her graduate degree in mathematics with the goal of becoming a college professor. She will also be attending a competitive summer research experience for undergraduates in 2013. “This is precisely what this program is about – opening new doors to our students into mathematics and the STEM disciplines,” he pointed out.

Dr. Vega-Vazquez is looking forward to a geographical expansion of the program. “We are considering the possibility of establishing a similar alliance in the southeast, with Coastal Georgia as one of the main campuses in this region. We are planning to include Georgia, Florida, Tennessee, and South Carolina within the new alliance region. This will definitely bring lots of opportunities to our students and faculty. I will continue to work to make Coastal Georgia a choice destination for students planning to major in any of the STEM disciplines. Certainly the future looks bright for our department and for the College.”

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Release Date: 11/26/2012
Source: College of Coastal Georgia

Media Contact:
John Cornell
O: 912.279.5703
C: 912.223.9997
jcornell@ccga.edu



Release Date: 10/15/2012

College to Host Math and Science Expo Sponsored by Pinova

Brunswick, GA – The College of Coastal Georgia will be hosting a new program on Saturday, February 9, 2013, for middle and high school students in Brantley, Camden, Glynn, McIntosh, Ware and Wayne counties – the inaugural Math and Science Expo with corporate sponsorship by Pinova, a community partner with the College. The Expo will include activities and competitions, academic bowl competitions, and programs for parents and for teachers.

The College will also provide a limited Coastal Georgia Regional Science and Engineering Fair for middle and high school students from Glynn, McIntosh and Wayne counties interested in competing for an opportunity to exhibit at the 2013 state competition held March 21-23 at the Athens Classic Center. The two-day Science and Engineering Fair will begin on Friday, February 8.

Both programs will be held on the Brunswick campus. For preliminary information, contact Dr. Andrea Wallace at 912.279.5931 or awallace@ccga.edu or Joan Rozmarynoski at 912.279.5876 or jrozmarynoski@ccga.edu.

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Release Date: 10/15/2012
Source: College of Coastal Georgia

Media Contact:
John Cornell
O: 912.279.5703
C: 912.223.9997
jcornell@ccga.edu



Release Date: 05/01/2012

Three Students Accepted for Summer Research Programs

Brunswick, GA – Robert Chastain of Woodbine, Brandon Dunlap of Kennesaw, and Dayton Ireland of Brunswick will be out of town this summer, attending research programs at other universities.

Ireland, a math major, has been accepted for the summer research program in mathematics at the University of Arizona, Tucson.

Dunlap, a biology major, will be participating in the Marine Biology Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) at Savannah State University.

Chastain, also a math major, will be traveling to Morgantown for the summer research program at West Virginia University.

“This is a significant achievement and will certainly open new venues for them and for all of our students,” Dr. Victor Vega, Associate Professor of Mathematics, enthusiastically noted. Vega, who is a member of the National Alliance for Doctoral Studies in the Mathematical Sciences, serves as a mentor and adviser to undergraduates participating in the Alliance.

“REUs are very competitive,” Dr. Kimberly Pause Tucker, Assistant Professor of Biology, added. “It is great that we have three students in the School of Mathematics and Natural Sciences that have been accepted for this type of activity.”

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Release Date: 5/1/2012
Source: College of Coastal Georgia

Media Contact:
John Cornell
O: 912.279.5703
C: 912.223.9997
jcornell@ccga.edu



Release Date: 09/27/2011

CCGA Students to Attend Fifth Annual Mathematical Field of Dreams Conference

Brunswick, GA –Three College of Coastal Georgia students have been tapped to attend the Fifth Annual Mathematical Field of Dreams Conference October 14-16 at Arizona State University in Tempe, sponsored by the National Alliance for Doctoral Studies in the Mathematical Sciences. The students were nominated by Dr. Victor Vega, Associate Professor of Mathematics in the School of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, an Alliance member and mentor.

  • Robert Chastain of Woodbine, a junior majoring in mathematics;
  • Wallace Ireland of Brunswick, a junior mathematics major in the secondary education track; and
  • Robert Hampton of Brunswick, a junior mathematics major who already holds a M.S. in Information Systems and serves as Assistant Professor of Computer Science and Computer Technology in the School of Business and Public Affairs.

“With our new baccalaureate degree in mathematics, I believe the time is right to introduce our students to an opportunity to experience firsthand the infinite possibilities available to them in the discipline of mathematics. From scholarships and job opportunities to networking with fellow students and graduate faculty from across the nation, this conference encompasses so much that is beneficial to their futures,” explained Dr. Vega. “Networking is most important for broadening students’ horizons. But it is equally important to institutions and faculty, as colleagues explore opportunities for collaboration.”

One of the conference purposes is to bring together faculty in the mathematical sciences and talented undergraduate students who are underrepresented in those fields to encourage their participation in graduate programs. In a series of panel discussions, students will learn about different degree opportunities in the mathematical sciences, paths to earn a doctorate, graduate school selection and application, tips for graduate school success, and career opportunities once the Ph.D. is achieved.

Student attendance is by invitation only and includes payment of travel, hotel and conference expenses.

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Release Date: 9/27/2011
Source: College of Coastal Georgia

Media Contact:
John Cornell
O: 912.279.5703
C: 912.223.9997
jcornell@ccga.edu



Release Date: 08/25/2011

College of Coastal Georgia Welcomes New Faculty for 2011-12 Academic Year

From the Advancement Office

Brunswick, GA –Eleven new faculty members have joined the full-time teaching staff of the College of Coastal Georgia for the new academic year.

Robert R. Bleil, Assistant Professor of English
Prior to joining the College faculty, Dr. Bleil was a lecturer in English with Salisbury University in Maryland and served as a lecturer and as Assistant Director for the Institute for the Arts and Humanities for The Pennsylvania State University. He received his Ph.D. and M.A. in English from The Pennsylvanie State University, his M.L.S. from the University of Pittsburgh, and his B.A. in English and Philosophy, cum laude, from the University of Notre Dame.

Marci R. Culley, Visiting Assistant Professor of Psychology
Dr. Culley served as Assistant Professor in the Community Psychology Ph.D. Program of Georgia State University for seven years. She earned a Ph.D. in Community Psychology from the University of Missouri-Kansas City, an M.A. in Community Psychology and Social Change from The Pennsylvania State University at Harrisburg, and B.S. in Psychology from Michigan State University.

Jim Fullerton, Assistant Professor of Management and Leadership Development
Dr. Fullerton served as Leadership Program Director at Idaho State University from 1997 until his move this summer to St. Simons Island. He received his Ph.D. in Human Sciences and his B.A. in Journalism from University of Nebraska-Lincoln and his M.P.A. from the University of Nebraska at Omaha.

Jennifer Pooler Gray, Assistant Professor of English and Writing Center Director
As Director of the College’s new Writing Center, Dr. Gray will be securing funding, hiring tutors, and providing in-class workshops and campus-wide professional development sessions. She served a similar role at the University of Texas at Tyler and was Assistant Director of the Writing Resources Center and Associate Director of the National Writing Project at UNC Charlotte. Dr. Gray received her Ph.D. in Curriculum and Instruction with specialization in Composition and Rhetoric from UNC Charlotte and her M.A. in English Literature from Virginia Polytechnic Institute in Blacksburg.

Laura Lynch, Assistant Professor of Mathematics
Dr. Lynch received her Ph.D. in May from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln for her work on Annihilators of Local Cohomology Modules. She worked as a graduate teaching assistant at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln for six years while completing her M.S. in Mathematics and her Ph.D. dissertation. She is a cum laude graduate of the Harriet L. Wilkes Honors College of Florida Atlantic University, earning her B.A. in Liberal Arts and Sciences with concentrations in Math and Physics.

Kimberly Kinsey Mannahan, Assistant Professor of Psychology
For three years, Dr. Kinsey served as Visiting Assistant Professor of Psychology at Agnes Scott College in Decatur. Prior to that, she was a full time instructor at Augusta State University. She has also served as an adjunct and online instructor for Georgia Perimeter College, University of Phoenix, and Aiken Technical College. Dr. Kinsey received her Ph.D. in Experimental Psychology (Social) from the University of Arkansas, her M.S. in Applied Psychology (Clinical/Counseling) from Augusta State University, and her B.A. in Psychology from UGA.

Jamil W. Mortada, Assistant Professor of Mathematics
Dr. Mortada received his Ph.D. in Pure Mathematics from Florida State University in April with his dissertation, Artin and Dehn Twist Subgroups of the Mapping Class Group. His M.S. in Pure Mathematics is also from Florida State; his B.S. in Mathematics if from the University of Arizona. He has served as a mathematics instructor at both universities.

Charlsie A. Myers, Visiting Assistant Professor of Psychology
Professor Myers is completing her doctoral studies in Health Psychology at the University of North Carolina Charlotte, where she has also served as an instructor, graduate teaching assistant, and guest lecturer. She received her M.A. in Experimental Psychology with a concentration in Biopsychology and her B.S. in Biology from the University of Alabama in Huntsville.

David J. Stasek, Assistant Professor of Biology
Dr. Stasek has served as an adjunct faculty member of Cuyahoga Community College as well as Visiting Assistant Professor of Biology at The College of Wooster, both in Ohio. He received his Ph.D. and M.S. in Zoology/Ecology from Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, where he was also a teaching associate. He earned his B.S. in Biology from Baldwin-Wallace College in Berea, Ohio.

Sandra C. Taylor, Visiting Assistant Professor of Business and Management
Dr. Taylor enjoys teaching graduate and undergraduate courses in organizational studies, including corporate social responsibility, business ethics, human resources management, organizational behavior, and strategic management. She has taught numerous online course sections as Online College Professor and Curriculum Lead for Kaplan College Online, including serving as MBA Department Chair for Kaplan University Graduate School of Management. She received her Ph.D. in Human Resources Management from UGA, her M.S. in Counseling Psychology and her MBA from Georgia State University, and her B.A. in Philosophy from UGA.

Gerard J. White, Assistant Professor of Biology
Dr. White is experienced as a laboratory technician, research assistant, and teaching assistant. He earned his Ph.D. in Plant Pathology and Microbiology from the University of Arizona, his M.Sc. and B.Sc. with honors) in Plant Sciences from the University of Western Ontario, and a Diploma of Medical Laboratory Technology from College of the North Atlantic.

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Release Date: 8/25/2011
Source: Advancement Office

By Peggy L. Golden



Release Date: 03/09/2011

Board of Regents Approves Two New Baccalaureate Degree Programs at the College of Coastal Georgia

Brunswick, GA- The Board of Regents of the University System of Georgia (USG) approved, at its March 8 meeting in Atlanta, two new baccalaureate degree programs for the College of Coastal Georgia. The two new degree programs are:
  • Bachelor of Science in Psychology
  • Bachelor of Science in Mathematics

"The new degrees in Psychology and Mathematics bring us to eight bachelor's programs and add to the already impressive offerings designed to prepare students for meaningful careers and graduate school," College President Valerie Hepburn, Ph.D., said. "We expect both programs to attract highly qualified students and to produce outstanding thinkers and future leaders."

The Psychology degree is designed for students who want to make a difference in the lives of others, with three areas of concentration:

  1. Psychology of Human Services, an emerging field at the intersection of psychology, health, and business;
  2. Organizational and Community Leadership, an applied field based in organizational and community psychology and business;
  3. General Psychology, a traditional baccalaureate program of study in preparation for graduate work.

Psychology is the scientific study of behavior and mental processes. Contemporary psychology is an interdisciplinary field with pathways to careers involving service to improve the well-being of individuals and the social health of communities. The psychology program will provide students with a rigorous program of study in the science of psychology, including the theory, research, and quantitative methods of both basic and applied psychology. The innovative curriculum will encourage students to integrate their own interests with course work and community service, culminating in a capstone project. The program will roll out over the next three years, beginning with an anticipated cohort of 30 students in fall semester 2011.

Dr. Carla Bluhm, Assistant Professor of Psychology and faculty advisor to the Psychology Club, a new student organization on campus, said she was thrilled with the approval of the Board of Regents. "The timing of the approval converges with students becoming interested in the discipline. We have a small but eager group of engaged students who have been anticipating this opportunity. Collectively they will adopt, nurture and support this new program."

The Mathematics degree is designed for students who enjoy the intellectual challenge and satisfaction of studying math and are interested in pursuing graduate studies in mathematics or engineering or careers such as secondary school math instruction or industry and government positions in finance, mathematical modeling, statistics, computer science, operations research, hydrology, epidemiology, cryptology and similar fields. The degree offers two tracks, beginning fall semester 2011:

  1. Secondary Education in Mathematics;
  2. Mathematics, with options in pure and applied math.

Highly-qualified science and math teachers are important regionally and to Georgia because of implications for long-term economic growth and stability. As influencers, they impact the number of high school graduates who pursue advanced degrees in science, technology, engineering and math. The economic welfare of a state is often linked to the number of graduates in those disciplines.

According to Dr. German Vargas, Assistant Professor of Mathematics, "This proposed BS degree in Mathematics will be a synergistic program of study that will simultaneously draw on and strengthen our existing programs while building an attractive degree option that responds to state and regional workforce needs."


About the College

The mission of the College of Coastal Georgia is to foster academic excellence and individual development; investigate, capture and disseminate 21st century knowledge and skills; provide accessible and affordable higher education to a wide spectrum of learners; and engage actively with the community and region.

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Release Date: 3/9/2011
Source: College of Coastal Georgia

Media Contact:
John Cornell
O: 912.279.5703
C: 912.223.9997
jcornell@ccga.edu

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