Learning Communities

You’ll belong to a community of learners.

Freshman Learning CommunitiesLearning communities are groups of students who connect what they are learning in each individual class with a common theme or major. Students in a learning community take some or all of their courses together. Through the learning community structure, intentional efforts are made to create a supportive and inclusive network among students, mentors, staff, and faculty to assist students. Some learning communities are living-learning communities where the students may live in adjacent suites in one of our residence halls; however, learning communities are open to students living on and off-campus.

Learning Communities are a High Impact Practice and research shows students who participate in a Learning Community:

  • Are more likely to persist in college,
  • Have higher grade point averages,
  • Are more engaged with faculty members and fellow students, and
  • Have greater satisfaction with their overall college experience

WHY PARTICIPATE IN A LEARNING COMMUNITY? (FOR STUDENTS)

As part of a learning community, you’ll learn and succeed with fellow students to:

  • Get hands-on experience, applying classroom learning to real-world situations
  • Develop leadership and team-building skills through interactions with your classmates
  • Take part in social activities with others in the community, including faculty and mentors
  • Get involved and help the community through service learning projects
  • Form new friendships, which will give you an instant support system
  • Have contact with others who have similar academic and career goals
  • Have more frequent and meaningful engagement with faculty

WHY TEACH IN A LEARNING COMMUNITY? (FOR FACULTY)

Faculty who participate in Learning Communities:

  • Achieve personal and professional growth through collaborative teaching with other faculty members
  • Foster a stronger relationship with your students which allows for more engaged and interested students
  • Implement active, innovative, and collaborative teaching and learning strategies
  • Share their scholarly and personal interests with their students
  • Make connections between curricular and co-curricular experiences
  • Gain a better understanding of their students and their development
  • Increase their knowledge of university resources
  • Have opportunities for professional development, including additional funding


Want to learn more?

Kennesaw State University has created a six-week online faculty development course focused on the high-impact practice of student learning communities. In the Learning Communities Faculty Scholars course, participants are encouraged to dive deeper into scholarly teaching and the scholarship of teaching and learning as they apply to learning communities. Course participants learn about integrative assignments, theories of student learning, research methods and more, while engaging in discourse and idea exchange with learning communities faculty at other institutions. For more information, visit this page.

WHAT LEARNING COMMUNITY IS A SPECIFIC COURSE PART OF?

For Fall 2017, the following courses are part of a learning community (LC):

CRN

Subject

Course

Title

Learning Community (LC)

80438

ARTS

1100

Art Appreciation

First-Year LC - Liberal Arts - Afternoon

80439

ARTS

1100

Art Appreciation

First-Year LC - STEM

80026

BIOL

1107

Principles of Biology I

First-Year LC - Biology

80750

BIOL

1107L

Prin. of Biology I Lab

First-Year LC - Biology

80050

BUSA

1105

Introduction to Business

First-Year LC - Business

80170

CHEM

1151

Survey of Chemistry I

First-Year LC - Health Science

80174

CHEM

1211

Principles of Chemistry I

First-Year LC - Biology

80178

CHEM

1211

Principles of Chemistry I

First-Year LC - STEM

80172

CHEM

1151L

Survey of Chemistry I Lab

First-Year LC - Health Science

80183

CHEM

1211L

Principles of Chemistry I Lab

First-Year LC - Biology

80184

CHEM

1211L

Principles of Chemistry I Lab

First-Year LC - STEM

80462

ENGL

1101

English Composition I

First-Year LC - Liberal Arts - Morning

80467

ENGL

1101

English Composition I

First-Year LC - Health Science

80472

ENGL

1101

English Composition I

First-Year LC - Biology

80474

ENGL

1101

English Composition I

First-Year LC - Liberal Arts - Afternoon

80479

ENGL

1101

English Composition I

First-Year LC - Business

80565

ENGL

1101

English Composition I

First-Year LC - STEM

80323

GEOG

1101

Intro to Human Geography

First-Year LC - Liberal Arts - Morning

80326

HIST

2111

U.S. History I

First-Year LC - Health Science

80329

HIST

2111

U.S. History I

First-Year LC - Liberal Arts - Morning

80227

MATH

997

Support for Quant Reasoning

First-Year LC - Liberal Arts - Morning

80233

MATH

999

Support for College Algebra

First-Year LC - Liberal Arts - Afternoon

80246

MATH

1001

Quantitative Reasoning

Culinary Arts LC

80243

MATH

1001

Quantitative Reasoning

First-Year LC - Liberal Arts - Morning

80248

MATH

1001

Quantitative Reasoning

First-Year LC - Health Science

80256

MATH

1111

College Algebra

First-Year LC - Biology /STEM

80262

MATH

1111

College Algebra

First-Year LC - Liberal Arts - Afternoon

80272

MATH

1113

Precalculus

First-Year LC - Biology /STEM

80345

POLS

1101

American Government

First-Year LC - Biology

80346

POLS

1101

American Government

First-Year LC - Business

80347

POLS

1101

American Government

First-Year LC - STEM

80355

PSYC

1101

Intro to General Psychology

First-Year LC - Business

80356

PSYC

1101

Intro to General Psychology

First-Year LC - Liberal Arts - Afternoon

80373

SOCI

1101

Introduction to Sociology

First-Year LC - Liberal Arts - Morning & Afternoon

80430

SOCI

1101

Introduction to Sociology

First-Year LC - Health Science

80504

THEA

1100

Theatre Appreciation

First-Year LC - Business

WHAT LEARNING COMMUNITIES ARE AVAILABLE?

First-Year Learning Communities

The Office of Academic Affairs, in conjunction with Schools, Departments, and Student Support Services on campus have created a series of first-year learning communities for incoming first-time full-time freshmen, based on their major. We have developed a separate webpage for information specifically on our First-Year Learning Communities.

Critical Thinking Learning Community

The Departments of Mathematics and Arts & Humanities have joined to create a Critical Thinking Learning Community each spring semester. This LC has students jointly enroll in PHIL 2010 Critical Thinking & Reasoning and MATH 2110 Logic (which satisfy Area C and Area D, respectively, of the core curriculum). For more information, contact Dr. Catherine Culver (cculver@ccga.edu) or Mr. Thomas Hippchen (thippchen@ccga.edu).

Culinary Arts Learning Communities

The School of Business and Public Management has worked with the Department of Mathematics and the Department of Natural Sciences to create special sections of math and sciences courses specifically for culinary arts students.

Each fall, the Department of Mathematics runs a special section of MATH 1001 Quantitative Reasoning that infuses culinary mathematics throughout the curriculum. For more information, contact Mr. James Holt (jholt@ccga.edu).

Each summer, the Department of Natural Sciences runs a special section of CHEM 1000/CHEM 1000L Introductory Chemistry that infuses culinary science in the curriculum. For more information, contact Dr. Andrea Wallace (awallace@ccga.edu).

Honors Program Learning Communities

The College of Coastal Georgia has an Honors Program with a number of courses specifically for honors program students. Each semester, we offer a learning community of some of these courses for the honors program students to take. Be on the lookout for the “H” at the end of the course number on Honors Program courses.

  • CHEM 1100H Honors Introduction to the Chemistry of the Oceans
  • ENGL 1101H Honors English Composition I
  • ENGL 1102H Honors English Composition II
  • ENGL 2130H Honors American Literature
  • GLOB 1001H Honors Global Issues
  • HIST 2111H Honors US History I
  • HONS 1101 Honors Seminar
  • HONS 3001 Advanced Honors Seminar
  • MATH 2112H Honors Probability and Statistics
  • POLS 1101H Honors American Government

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

How is being in a learning community different from regular college life?

Being a part of a Learning Community provides a greater chance for connection for your academic success. You’ll be attending classes and possibly Learning Community events with like-minded students and faculty—you’ll be studying with them and participating in events with them. Learning Communities provide support—both academically and personally—study sessions, tutoring, peer mentors, and making new friends are all a part of the Learning Community experience.

Is there an extra cost associated with a learning community?

No, there are no extra fees or costs to belong to a Learning Community—we have worked hard to provide support to manage these programs—all to help you succeed.

Can I participate in more than one learning community?

We don’t recommend participating in more than one within a specific semester; to be truly active in a Learning Community, you need to have dedication and commitment. Adjusting to life in college can be difficult for some students, and being a part of a Learning Community can help with that; however, we wouldn’t want you to over extend yourself in the first year by trying to do too much within multiple communities.

Can I participate in a learning community if I have Learning Support courses?

Yes, in fact, several of our learning communities have learning support courses included for a subset of the learning community students.

Can I also be in the Honors Program?

Yes, in fact, the Honors Program has Learning Communities of their own.

What benefits will a learning community provide to my son or daughter?

Learning Community students have the benefit of immediately being a part of a group of like-minded students, faculty and staff. Students in a Learning Community have a group of student to go to classes and events with; they will study together, play together, volunteer together, and in some cases even live together. A Learning Community is a support system, coordinated to help your child succeed at college life. With tools learned from this community, your student will be better prepared for the future—adapting to college and life beyond.

What are the academic benefits to being in a learning community?

Members of a Learning Community experience learning at a deeper level. Data shows that grades go up and students do better at their studies. Learning Community students persist; they are more likely to stay in school and complete their course of study. Data show that Learning Community students experience less of a decline in self-esteem and have a greater sense of connection to the college community.

I have an idea for a new learning community. Who do I talk to?

We are always looking for new and innovative ideas for our academic curriculum. Please share any ideas you may have for learning communities with Dr. Laura Lynch, Assistant Vice President for Faculty Affairs (llynch@ccga.edu).

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